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This is a really, really stupid question but I am so accustomed to using linq / other methods for connecting and querying a database that I never stopped to learn how to do it from the ground up.

Question: How do I establish a manual connection to a database and pass it a string param in C#? (yes, I know.. pure ignorance).

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(databaseConnectionString))
{
    using (SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
    {
        cmd.CommandText = "StoredProcedureName";
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ID", fileID);

        conn.Open();
        using (SqlDataReader rdr =
                   cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection))
        {
            if (rdr.Read())
            {
                // process row from resultset;
            }
        }
    }
}
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One uses the SqlCommand class to execute commands (either stored procedures or sql) on SQL Server using ado.net. Tutorials abound.

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Thanks - I attempted to search for it but was getting a wide range of results, none of which seemed to be what I was looking for. the SqlCommand class certainly narrows down my search. Thanks –  Chance Mar 3 '09 at 2:22

Here's an example from http://www.csharp-station.com/Tutorials/AdoDotNet/Lesson07.aspx

public void RunStoredProcParams()
    {
    	SqlConnection conn = null;
    	SqlDataReader rdr  = null;

    	// typically obtained from user
    	// input, but we take a short cut
    	string custId = "FURIB";

    	Console.WriteLine("\nCustomer Order History:\n");

    	try
    	{
    		// create and open a connection object
    		conn = new 
    			SqlConnection("Server=(local);DataBase=Northwind;Integrated Security=SSPI");
    		conn.Open();

    		// 1.  create a command object identifying
    		//     the stored procedure
    		SqlCommand cmd  = new SqlCommand(
    			"CustOrderHist", conn);

    		// 2. set the command object so it knows
    		//    to execute a stored procedure
    		cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

    		// 3. add parameter to command, which
    		//    will be passed to the stored procedure
    		cmd.Parameters.Add(
    			new SqlParameter("@CustomerID", custId));

    		// execute the command
    		rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();

    		// iterate through results, printing each to console
    		while (rdr.Read())
    		{
    			Console.WriteLine(
    				"Product: {0,-35} Total: {1,2}",
    				rdr["ProductName"],
    				rdr["Total"]);
    		}
    	}
    	finally
    	{
    		if (conn != null)
    		{
    			conn.Close();
    		}
    		if (rdr != null)
    		{
    			rdr.Close();
    		}
    	}	
    }
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Thanks man, thats exactly what I was looking for. –  Chance Mar 3 '09 at 2:23
    
An improvement to this example is to use the "using" keyword to automatically dispose of Connection, Command and Reader instances. –  Ken Browning Mar 3 '09 at 2:23
    
Also: setting explicit data types for the query parameters. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 3 '09 at 3:06

3 things no one else has shown you yet:

  • "Stacking" using statements
  • Setting an explicit parameter type rather than letting .Net try to pick one for you
  • "var" keyword

.

string sql = "MyProcedureName";

using (var cn = new SqlConnection(databaseConnectionString))
using (var cmd = new SqlCommand(sql, cn))
{
    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    cmd.Parameters.Add("@ParameterName", SqlDbType.VarChar, 50)
        .Value = "MyParameterValue";

    conn.Open();
    using (SqlDataReader rdr =
               cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection))
    {
        if (rdr.Read())
        {
            // process row from resultset;
        }
    }
}
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