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What is the best place (which folder, etc) to put view-specific javascript files in an ASP.NET MVC application?

To keep my project organized, I'd really love to be able to put them side-by-side with the view's .aspx files, but I haven't found a good way to reference them when doing that without exposing the ~/Views/Action/ folder structure. Is it really a bad thing to let details of that folder structure leak?

The alternative is to put them in the ~/Scripts or ~/Content folders, but is a minor irritation because now I have to worry about filename clashes. It's an irritation I can get over, though, if it is "the right thing."

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2  
I found sections useful for this. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/4311783/… –  Frison B Alexander Apr 11 '13 at 13:25
    
This sounds like a crazy question, but an extremely useful scenario is when you nest a page's javascript file under the .cshtml. (For example, with NestIn). It helps not having to bounce around solution explorer. –  David Sherret Jan 17 '14 at 0:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 64 down vote accepted

Old question, but I wanted to put my answer incase anyone else comes looking for it.

I too wanted my view specific js/css files under the views folder, and here's how I did it:

In the web.config folder in the root of /Views you need to modify two sections to enable the webserver to serve the files:

    <system.web>
        <httpHandlers>
            <add path="*.js" verb="GET,HEAD" type="System.Web.StaticFileHandler" />
            <add path="*.css" verb="GET,HEAD" type="System.Web.StaticFileHandler" />
            <add path="*" verb="*" type="System.Web.HttpNotFoundHandler"/>
        </httpHandlers>
        <!-- other content here -->
    </system.web>

    <system.webServer>
        <handlers>
            <remove name="BlockViewHandler"/>
            <add name="JavaScript" path="*.js" verb="GET,HEAD" type="System.Web.StaticFileHandler" />
            <add name="CSS" path="*.css" verb="GET,HEAD" type="System.Web.StaticFileHandler" />
            <add name="BlockViewHandler" path="*" verb="*" preCondition="integratedMode" type="System.Web.HttpNotFoundHandler" />
        </handlers>
        <!-- other content here -->
    </system.webServer>

Then from your view file you can reference the urls like you expect:

@Url.Content("~/Views/<ControllerName>/somefile.css")

This will allow serving of .js and .css files, and will forbid serving of anything else.

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Thanks, davesw. Exactly what i was looking for –  Mr Bell Jun 23 '11 at 20:10
    
When i do this i get the error that httpHandlers cannot be used in pipeline mode. It wants me to switch to classic mode on the server. What is the the correct way of doing this when one does not want the server to use classic mode? –  Bjørn Øyvind Halvorsen Jul 17 '14 at 6:21

One way of achieving this is to supply your own ActionInvoker. Using the code included below, you can add to your controller's constructor:

ActionInvoker = new JavaScriptActionInvoker();

Now, whenever you place a .js file next to your view:

enter image description here

You can access it directly:

http://yourdomain.com/YourController/Index.js

Below is the source:

namespace JavaScriptViews {
    public class JavaScriptActionDescriptor : ActionDescriptor
    {
        private string actionName;
        private ControllerDescriptor controllerDescriptor;

        public JavaScriptActionDescriptor(string actionName, ControllerDescriptor controllerDescriptor)
        {
            this.actionName = actionName;
            this.controllerDescriptor = controllerDescriptor;
        }

        public override object Execute(ControllerContext controllerContext, IDictionary<string, object> parameters)
        {
            return new ViewResult();
        }

        public override ParameterDescriptor[] GetParameters()
        {
            return new ParameterDescriptor[0];
        }

        public override string ActionName
        {
            get { return actionName; }
        }

        public override ControllerDescriptor ControllerDescriptor
        {
            get { return controllerDescriptor; }
        }
    }

    public class JavaScriptActionInvoker : ControllerActionInvoker
    {
        protected override ActionDescriptor FindAction(ControllerContext controllerContext, ControllerDescriptor controllerDescriptor, string actionName)
        {
            var action = base.FindAction(controllerContext, controllerDescriptor, actionName);
            if (action != null)
            {
                return action;
            } 

            if (actionName.EndsWith(".js"))
            {
                return new JavaScriptActionDescriptor(actionName, controllerDescriptor);
            }

            else 
                return null;
        }
    }

    public class JavaScriptView : IView
    {
        private string fileName;

        public JavaScriptView(string fileName)
        {
            this.fileName = fileName;
        }

        public void Render(ViewContext viewContext, TextWriter writer)
        {
            var file = File.ReadAllText(viewContext.HttpContext.Server.MapPath(fileName));
            writer.Write(file);
        }
    }


    public class JavaScriptViewEngine : VirtualPathProviderViewEngine
    {
        public JavaScriptViewEngine()
            : this(null)
        {
        }

        public JavaScriptViewEngine(IViewPageActivator viewPageActivator)
            : base()
        {
            AreaViewLocationFormats = new[]
            {
                "~/Areas/{2}/Views/{1}/{0}.js",
                "~/Areas/{2}/Views/Shared/{0}.js"
            };
            AreaMasterLocationFormats = new[]
            {
                "~/Areas/{2}/Views/{1}/{0}.js",
                "~/Areas/{2}/Views/Shared/{0}.js"
            };
            AreaPartialViewLocationFormats = new []
            {
                "~/Areas/{2}/Views/{1}/{0}.js",
                "~/Areas/{2}/Views/Shared/{0}.js"
            };
            ViewLocationFormats = new[]
            {
                "~/Views/{1}/{0}.js",
                "~/Views/Shared/{0}.js"
            };
            MasterLocationFormats = new[]
            {
                "~/Views/{1}/{0}.js",
                "~/Views/Shared/{0}.js"
            };
            PartialViewLocationFormats = new[]
            {
                "~/Views/{1}/{0}.js",
                "~/Views/Shared/{0}.js"
            };
            FileExtensions = new[]
            {
                "js"
            };
        }

        public override ViewEngineResult FindView(ControllerContext controllerContext, string viewName, string masterName, bool useCache)
        {
            if (viewName.EndsWith(".js"))
                viewName = viewName.ChopEnd(".js");
            return base.FindView(controllerContext, viewName, masterName, useCache);
        }


        protected override IView CreatePartialView(ControllerContext controllerContext, string partialPath)
        {
            return new JavaScriptView(partialPath);
        }

        protected override IView CreateView(ControllerContext controllerContext, string viewPath, string masterPath)
        {
            return new JavaScriptView(viewPath);
        }
    }
}
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You can invert davesw's suggestion and block only .cshtml

<httpHandlers>
    <add path="*.cshtml" verb="*" type="System.Web.HttpNotFoundHandler"/>
</httpHandlers>
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! :) A nice short solution! And it works! :) I have no idea why this is not the default setting, because it is much better to be able to keep scripts relating to views together with the actual views. Thanks, Vadym. –  BruceHill Dec 20 '12 at 7:10
6  
I would be cautious with this approach, even though it seems nice and clean. If in the future, this app includes view engines other than Razor (ex WebForms, Spark, etc), they will silently be public. Also affecting files like Site.Master. Whitelisting seems the safer approach –  arserbin3 Sep 24 '13 at 22:28

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