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I want to design a class OilPump which has 2 attribute.Id and capacity.Now there is a constraint that oilpump should have capacity <6 and >0 .
1) Is it a a good practice to design my class as show below?Throwing exception out of constructure if it doesnot satisfy the onditions.
2) If i provide a setter method what will it look like?
3) Should i develop a helper method validateCapacity that is actually called from setCapicity?

public class OilPump {
        private String ID;
        private int Capacity;
        public OilPump(String id,int c)throws MyException{
            if(id.length()==6 && (c<6 && c>0)) {Capacity=c;ID=id;}
            else{
                throw new MyException("Invalid OilpumpID or Capacity");
                //System.out.println("Invalid OilpumpID");
            }
        }
        void start()
        {
            System.out.println("Oil Pump is  started");
        }
        void stop()
        {
            System.out.println("Oil Pump is Stopped");
        }

    }
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4 Answers 4

looks fine. you have private fields and public methods, which is right. The only things I'll point out are:

1) java convention is for camelCasing, so your fields should be id and capacity.
2) Right now your class is immutable (i.e. the data in it cant be changed). If you want that, fine, but if want to be able to modify capacity you should add java-bean style setters and getters.

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1) Constructors should not throw exceptions (remember it's bad practice to allow the user to proceed in an step that would cause an exception: consider data contracts); 2) You could use a SetCapacity(Int32) for your setter; 3) Yes, creating separate methods for specific functionality is the objective of OO design;

Hope it helps, --KRG

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You should start variables/fields with lowercase.

Although what you have isn't wrong, it makes class usage simpler if you throw the unchecked exception IllegalArgumentException when the parameters are wrong instead of a custom, checked exception. Then you should just provide appropriate javadoc to define what the acceptable parameters are.

The setters/getters are not required unless you want the class to be mutable.

I would not bother with the validate method if your validation remains this trivial, but I would if it got any more complex. There certainly isn't anything wrong with doing it anyway.

It would also be typical to test and fail if necessary up front, then simply do the rest of your code outside of the if block.

if ((newId != null) || (newId.length() != 6) || (newCapacity > 6) || (newCapacity < 0))
{
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Valid values must be ...");
}
id = newId;
capacity = newCapacity;
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Perhaps a question of personal style, but I would create a factory method that encapsulates the validation and make the constructor private. That way is is easier to use the OilPump class in a hierarchy if it is required in the future. The class would be something like this:

public class OilPump {
    private String id;
    private int capacity;


    public static OilPump create(String id, int capacity) {

        if(id.length()==6 && (c<6 && c>0)) {
              return new OilPump(id,capacity;
        }
        else{
            throw new IllegalArgumentException ("Invalid OilpumpID or Capacity");
        }
    }

    private OilPump(String id,int capacity) {
        this.capacity=capacity;
        this.id=id;
    }

    void start()
    {
        System.out.println("Oil Pump is  started");
    }
    void stop()
    {
        System.out.println("Oil Pump is Stopped");
    }

}
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Can't imagine why you would want to do this. How is this supposed to work better in a hierarchy if you can no longer extend it? –  Robin May 18 '11 at 20:33

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