Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using CSS to style my webpage. I want to apply the following CSS to every element on my form without having to set is individually for each element.

I was hoping there was some kind of wild card character that I could apply here.

Here is the CSS that I am trying to make global:

.noSelect 
    {
        -webkit-user-select: none;
        -khtml-user-select: none;
        -moz-user-select: none;
        -o-user-select: none;
        user-select: none;
        cursor: default;
        margin:0px;
        padding:0px;
    }
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

See the universal selector

share|improve this answer
    
Are you implying that I can just say { CSS HERE } with nothing (or an *) in front? let me try it real quick. –  Xander May 18 '11 at 18:25
    
No, I'm not saying you can use 'nothing'. You have to use the universal selector: * –  Quentin May 18 '11 at 18:26
1  
@DalexL, you would write * { ..css attributes here.. }. Example: I use the selector frequently, when I want to see borders around everything for debugging purposes. –  Zabba May 18 '11 at 18:26
    
Dorward... meh... –  Xander May 18 '11 at 18:27
    
in some browsers disabling ALL the select causing an issue.. like textbox- try and select something-- it becomes like a readonly text box. –  ppumkin May 18 '11 at 18:53

Yes, use the universal selector

html * { ... }
share|improve this answer

What kind of tags are you using in your form? You could try starting with this:

.noSelect, input, textarea, select, label
{
    -webkit-user-select: none;
    -khtml-user-select: none;
    -moz-user-select: none;
    -o-user-select: none;
    user-select: none;
    cursor: default;
    margin:0px;
    padding:0px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Don't you mean: .noSelect input, .noSelect textarea, .noSelect select, .noSelect label { ...? –  sholsinger May 18 '11 at 18:25
    
No. I dont know what his HTML looks like so I wasnt trying to make any assumptions about heirarchy. –  Jeff May 18 '11 at 18:29

You need to change your selector. Instead of .noSelect, you want something like:

#formID *
{
  /* your css */
}

If you're doing it dynamically through jquery or something, just add/remove a class from the root:

#formID.inactive *
share|improve this answer

How about:

.noSelect * {
  -webkit-user-select: none;
  -khtml-user-select: none;
  -moz-user-select: none;
  -o-user-select: none;
  user-select: none;
  cursor: default;
  margin:0px;
  padding:0px;
}

With the following form code:

<form class="noSelect">
  <!-- stuff here -->
</form>

Unfortunately the disabled attribute cannot be applied to a form (officially). But perhaps it's better to do something like this

<form>
  <label for="i1">Label 1</label>
  <input type="text" id="i1" disabled>
  <label for="i2">Label 2</label>
  <input type="checkbox" value="1" id="i2" disabled>
  <!-- More inputs and stuff. -->
</form>

If you're using jQuery you can apply the disabled attribute with the following in a <script> block:

// pre jQuery 1.6 (eg 1.5.x, 1.4.x, 1.3.x, ...)
$('form :input').attr('disabled', true);
// jQuery 1.6+
$('form :input').prop('disabled', true);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.