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I'm getting this error:

Declaration of PayPal::raiseError() should be compatible with that of PEAR::raiseError()

These are PEAR::raiseError() and PayPal::raiseError() respectively:

function &raiseError($message = null,
                     $code = null,
                     $mode = null,
                     $options = null,
                     $userinfo = null,
                     $error_class = null,
                     $skipmsg = false)
{


class PayPal extends PEAR
{
    function raiseError($message, $code = null)
    {
        return parent::raiseError($message, $code, null, null, null, 'PayPal_Error');
    }

Any way to make it work without modifying the definitions?

I read here about the order the class are loaded. Could that be the problem?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem has nothing to do with the order in which classes are loaded. Since PayPal extends PEAR, any function that would take a PEAR object as parameter actually might be given a PayPal object. And since the PEAR method raiseError() allows up to seven parameters, the PayPal method should also allow at least up to seven parameters.

The best solution would be to refactor raiseError() in PayPal:

function raiseError($message = null,
                    $code = null,
                    $mode = null,
                    $options = null,
                    $userinfo = null,
                    $error_class = null,
                    $skipmsg = false)
{
    return parent::raiseError($message, $code, $mode, $options,
                              $userinfo, 'PayPal_Error', $skipmsg);
}
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Thanks, it works!, the only detail you forgot is the "&" before the name of the method. Without that the error is the same. –  ziiweb May 19 '11 at 11:33

The signature (parameters) of the child class method need to be the same as the parent method. This is because PHP does not allow overloading functions with varying parameter counts or types.

You could always just rename your raiseError method to something different, like raiseErrorWrapper to sidestep this issue.

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