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Possible Duplicate:
variable scope in statement blocks

I have following code snippet in c#,but is's not working

 static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            if (true)
            {
                string name = "test";
            }
            else
            {
                string name = "hello";
            }
            string name = "world";
        }

It gives me an error saying that 'name' is already declared in the last line, but if I change it for 'name = "some string" says that the variable name is not declared.

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marked as duplicate by Anthony Pegram, Gabe, jball, Neil Knight, CodesInChaos May 18 '11 at 18:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This scenario looks familiar... (and no, it's not a bug, it's in the spec) – BoltClock May 18 '11 at 18:47
    
@BoltClock and Anthony:Close my question – Santosh May 18 '11 at 18:50
    
This question has been asked a million times. Please search before asking, people! – dlev May 18 '11 at 18:50
1  
@geek, I think you'll also find this relevant. blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/04/25/… – Anthony Pegram May 18 '11 at 19:04
1  
A better link is this one, as it actually answers the question that was asked: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/11/02/… – Eric Lippert May 19 '11 at 6:45

Scoping rules in C# are not the same as C - if a variable name is declared in an outer scope it doesn't matter if it is declared after the inner scope.

The fact that you have declared a string name variable outside of the if statement means it is available within the blocks of the if/else.

The compiler is complaining because you are declaring additional variables with the same name within the if/else.

If you remove the type from the last line, then the variables are only declared in the inner scopes of the if/else but it is not known outside of them, hence the "variable name is not declared" error.

The following will compile just fine:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string name = "world";
        if (true)
        {
            name = "test";
        }
        else
        {
            name = "hello";
        }
    }

Here, the variable is declared in the outer scope and therefore visible in the inner scope. You are not re-declaring it in the inner scope, so no error.

Whether this is what you want is not clear from your question.

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@Oded:Thank you very much for the answer... – Santosh May 18 '11 at 18:55
    
Are you sure that compiles? I thought you couldn't use name before declaration, even though it is in scope. – dlev May 18 '11 at 18:56
    
@Oded, won't compile. You will get an error about using a local before it is declared. – Anthony Pegram May 18 '11 at 18:57
    
No it won't compile since name isn't in scope in the inner blocks. – CodesInChaos May 18 '11 at 18:57
1  
I think the OP knows how to work around the error and was just surprised that variables with not overlapping scopes can still cause a variable redeclared error. – CodesInChaos May 18 '11 at 19:15

You need to declare the name variable before your IF.

   static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string name;  
            if (true)  
            {  
                name = "test";  
            }  
            else  
            {  
                name = "hello";  
            }  
            //name = "world";  
        }  

The last statement is commented out because it will discard any changes you made to the variable name in the if-statement.

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But that isn't the same thing as what he has, above he has two variables local to their respective if blocks and that has one that is local to the function. – zellio May 18 '11 at 18:49
    
This isn't c - and is not a reflection of his code. – Oded May 18 '11 at 18:49
    
Without more context, this could be what the OP wants, or not... – Mr47 May 18 '11 at 18:50

This is correct like this. The part of the code where a variable blocks variables of the same name(Called declaration space) is different from the region in which it is accessible(the scope).

In particular the declaration space contains the whole block in which the variable is declared. So your name in the outer block prevents any other name variable in this block or a nested block. i.e. in your example the declaration spaces of the inner names and the outer name overlap causing the compiler error because any identifier must by unique inside its declaration spaces. The scopes of the inner and outer names don't overlap. And you can't use a variable outside its scope.

This is by design and correct according to the specification.

Check out Eric Lippert's blog on the difference between declaration space and scope: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/08/03/what-s-the-difference-part-two-scope-vs-declaration-space-vs-lifetime.aspx

The scope of a named entity is the region of program text in which it is legal to refer to that entity by its unqualified name.
A declaration space, by contrast, is a region of program text in which no two entities are allowed to have the same name.
In short, scope answers the question "where can I use this name?" and declaration space answers the question "where is this name unique?"

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