Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Title is basic enough, why can't I:

Dictionary<string, string> dic = new Dictionary<string, string>();
dic.AddRange(MethodThatReturnAnotherDic());
share|improve this question
    
2  
There are a lot that don't have AddRange, which has always mystified me. Like Collection<>. Just always seemed odd that List<> had it, but not Collection<> or other IList and ICollection objects. –  Tim May 18 '11 at 20:30
11  
I'm going to pull an Eric Lippert here: "because no one ever designed, specified, implemented, tested, documented and shipped that feature." –  Gabe Moothart May 18 '11 at 20:36
2  
@ Gabe Moothart - that's exactly what I had assumed. I love using that line on other people. They hate it though. :) –  Tim May 18 '11 at 20:41
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Range doesn't really have any meaning to an associative container does it? I think Dictionary stores it's values in a sorted fashion, but that isn't unique to Hashtables.

Anyway, with C# you can write your own extension method to merge dictionaries.

share|improve this answer
add comment

My guess is lack of proper output to the user as to what happened. As you can't have repeating keys in a dictionaries, how would you handle merging two dictionary where some keys intersect? Sure you could say: "I don't care" but that's breaking the convention of returning false / throwing an exception for repeating keys.

share|improve this answer
3  
How is that different from where you have a key-clash when you call Add, apart from that it can happen more than once. It would throw the same ArgumentException that Add does, surely? –  nicodemus13 Apr 19 '12 at 16:38
    
@nicodemus13 Yes, but you would not know which key threw the Exception, only that SOME key was a repeat. –  Gal Apr 23 '12 at 10:32
add comment

You could do this

Dictionary<string, string> dic = new Dictionary<string, string>();
MethodThatReturnAnotherDic(dic);

public void MethodThatReturnAnotherDic(Dictionary<string, string> dic)
{
    dic.Add(.., ..);
}

or use a List for addrange and/or using the pattern above.

List<KeyValuePair<string, string>>
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you're dealing w/ a new Dictionary (and you don't have existing rows to lose), you can always use ToDictionary() from another list of objects.

So, in your case, you would do something like this:

Dictionary<string, string> dic = new Dictionary<string, string>();
dic = SomeList.ToDictionary(x => x.Attribute1, x => x.Attribute2);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.