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I have a question about a particular query I'd like to execute against a PostgreSQL table. Although I welcome criticism of the table scheme I've used I'm going to be more appreciative of answers to my actual question!

I'm using the uuid-ossp postgresql-contrib module and have the following table structure:

       Column        |            Type             | Modifiers | Storage  | Description
---------------------+-----------------------------+-----------+----------+-------------
 revision_id         | uuid                        | not null  | plain    |
 document_id         | uuid                        | not null  | plain    |
 user_id             | uuid                        | not null  | plain    |
 datetime_edited     | timestamp without time zone | not null  | plain    |
 contents            | text                        | not null  | extended |
Indexes:
    "document_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (revision_id)

The idea is that:

  • A document may have one or more revisions. Revisions are not deleted. In order to update a document a new row is inserted with a new revision_id but an identical document_id.
  • revision_id is unique across all revisions for all documents.
  • contents is a blob of data that represents the document, and user_id identifies who updated the document.

I'm struggling to come up with a query that returns all the latest revisions for all documents created by a particular user. I know I can do, for example:

select * from document where user_id = '6a2aabc417b34ef99b14b10eaa8e9313';

but this returns all the documents. How do I drill down and ask for a grouping by document_id, and also LIMIT 1 and return the newest revision_id based on datetime_edited?

EDIT: Since a document can have one or more revisions I've been far to vague in saying "all documents created by a user". By created I mean that the user has contributed one or more revisions to the documents, i.e. there is at least one revision where the user edited the document.

Is something like this even achievable in one query, or do I need to hit the database several times to achieve this?

EDIT: revision_id is not monotonically increasing. It's a random UUID. Hence, max(revision_id) != max(datetime_edited).

share|improve this question
    
A better approach might be to put the old revisions in a separate table with a (doc_id, revision) compound PK and keep only the current revision in your document table. Then your query is pretty straight forward at the expense of more complicated updates. –  mu is too short May 18 '11 at 21:11
    
This is definitely an option. If queries for old revisions of documents is rare and there are many revisions per document then it will not only make the query simpler but faster in the long run. The downside is that the data isn't fully normalised but simplicity, for me, always wins. –  Asim Ihsan May 19 '11 at 7:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
Select ...
From document As D
    Join    (
            Select D1.document_id, Max( datetime_edited ) As datetime_edited
            From document As D1
            Group By D1.document_id
            ) As LastRevision
        On LastRevision.document_id = D.document_id
            And LastRevision.datetime_edited = D.datetime_edited
Where Exists    (
                Select 1
                From document As D2
                Where D2.document_id = D.document_id
                    And D2.user_id = '6a2aabc417b34ef99b14b10eaa8e9313'
                )

An alternate form:

Select ...
From document As D
    Join    (
            Select D1.document_id, Max( datetime_edited ) As datetime_edited
            From document As D1
            Group By D1.document_id
            ) As LastRevision
        On LastRevision.document_id = D.document_id
            And LastRevision.datetime_edited = D.datetime_edited
    Join    (
            Select D2.document_id
            From document As D2
            Where D2.user_id = '6a2aabc417b34ef99b14b10eaa8e9313'
            Group By D2.document_id
            ) As UserDocs
        On UserDocs.document_id = D.document_id
share|improve this answer
    
How did you figure that out? What can I read to write queries like this? This is seriously boggling my mind, but I just copy-pasted the first query into my psql prompt and it works so...I am unworthy. –  Asim Ihsan May 18 '11 at 21:14
1  
@Asymptote - I broke down the problem into constituent pieces. The first piece is determining "last revision". The next piece is filtering for a document on which the user had a revision which can be done with an Exists clause, Join or an In clause (which I didn't show). Then put them all together. –  Thomas May 18 '11 at 21:17
    
Ah I see...I'm copy-pasting the individual statements within each JOIN and I'm catching on. Thanks! –  Asim Ihsan May 18 '11 at 21:22
1  
@Asymptote - I do not see how the the 2nd query could return all document rows unless the user in question had a revision for every document. If in the 2nd query, you comment out the first join, you should only get documents on which the given user has a revision. If you comment the second join, you'll get every document's last revision (including those where the given user has no revision). –  Thomas May 18 '11 at 21:34
1  
@Asymptote - Btw, I am assuming that you cannot have a situation where you have two revisions for the same document_id with identical datetime_edited values. That scenario would require we find a way of determining which one was latest. Thus, a unique constraint on document_id, datetime_edited would be a good idea. –  Thomas May 18 '11 at 21:36

Get the highest revision id for each document, then select those documents:

select *
from document
where revision_id in (
  select max(revision_id)
  from document
  where user_id = '6a2aabc417b34ef99b14b10eaa8e9313'
  group by document_id
)

Update:

As the version id is not incremental, you will have to select the document_id and it's latest datetime_edited, and join against the document table:

select d.*
from document d
inner join (
  select document_id, max(datetime_edited) as datetime_edited
  from document
  where user_id = '6a2aabc417b34ef99b14b10eaa8e9313'
  group by document_id
) x on x.document_id = d.document_id and x.datetime_edited = d.datetime_edited
share|improve this answer
    
revision_id is not monotonically increasing. It's a random UUID. Hence, max(revision_id) != max(datetime_edited). –  Asim Ihsan May 18 '11 at 20:57
    
@Asymptote: I see. Then you would have to get the latest date for each document, and join against the document table. I added an update above. –  Guffa May 18 '11 at 21:46
    
I think the second version here (JOIN to subquery) is likely to have the best performance of the answers here. –  Andrew Lazarus May 18 '11 at 23:46

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