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I have come across the most curious problem ever as .Net dev. I am compiling a library which has a newly added property DeviceID in the class of UserInfo. The library internally uses the type and it's new property just fine, but when I try and reference it from another library, the compiler kicks back a compiler error stating

'library.UserInfo' does not contain a definition for 'DeviceID' and no extension 
method 'DeviceID' accepting a first argument of type 'library.UserInfo' could 
be found 

Even though my class definition looks like:

public class UserInfo
{
    public static UserInfo Current
    {
        get
        {
            if (UserInfoPrincipal.Current != null)
            {
                return UserInfoPrincipal.Current.UserData;
            }
            else
            {
                return null;
            }
        }
    }

    public string UserID { get; set; }
    public string DeviceID { get; set; }
    public string MikeLiUserID { get; set; }
    public string TransactionServer { get; set; }
    public string ApplicationKey { get; set; }
    public string IpAddress { get; set; }

}

The offending code reads as such:

    internal LogDetail BuildLogDetail(LogType entryType, string message)
    {
        return new LogDetail
        {
            ActingUserID = UserInfo.Current.UserID,
            ActingDeviceID = UserInfo.Current.DeviceID,
            ApplicationKey = UserInfo.Current.ApplicationKey,
            IpAddress = UserInfo.Current.IpAddress,
            EntryType = entryType,
            OwnerID = UserInfo.Current.UserID,
            LogData = message
        };
    }

I'd like to note that all of the other members of the UserInfo class go through the compiler correctly and it is just the DeviceID, which was added today, is causing the issue. I've tried Clean All, I've tried refreshing everything from TFS, manually deleting the obj and bin directories of both projects... nothing yet has worked.

UPDATE: This code, which is part of the library, works correctly:

public class UserInfoPrincipal : IPrincipal
{
    public static UserInfoPrincipal Current
    {
        get
        {
            if (Thread.CurrentPrincipal is UserInfoPrincipal)
                return (UserInfoPrincipal)Thread.CurrentPrincipal;
            else
                return null;
        }
    }

    ...

    internal UserInfo UserData
    {
        get { return _userInfo; }
    }

    public string DeviceID
    {
        get { return _userInfo.DeviceID; }
    }

    ...
}
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I've found that Visual Studio sometimes needs a restart... did you try that? –  Oded May 18 '11 at 21:07
    
Gone so far as to reboot the computer even –  thaBadDawg May 18 '11 at 21:10
    
@thaBadDawg - rebooting the whole computer? man, that means its a serious problem! :) Since you mentioned TFS - is there another dev machine you can get the sources from and try to build it there? Or even set up another workspace on your machine? –  Tim May 18 '11 at 21:26
    
The problem originally showed up on another dev's machine, had him check in the offending code and tried to work on it on my machine. Two machines with the same problem means that I am most likely overlooking something so incredibly simple I wouldn't even think to look at it. –  thaBadDawg May 18 '11 at 21:28
1  
@Jim - A better way would be to watch the msbuild diag output and see which reference it resolves. –  Ritch Melton May 18 '11 at 23:37
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So my hail mary pass was to remove the project reference and then add it again. Then it compiled. Have no clue why that worked, but figured I'd post it here for other who might run into the same problem.

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Are you using a VCS? Can you slap up a diff of the .csproj file here as part of your answer? –  Ritch Melton May 18 '11 at 22:30
    
Oddly enough, for the project file the only diff is the order in which the ProjectReferences are included. This library project was included at the top before, now it is at the bottom. Same Guid for the project, same name and file system location... is it possible that the compiler had a cached version of this project sitting somewhere? –  thaBadDawg May 19 '11 at 15:45
    
I dunno. The inproc compiler works different than the normal one, sometimes it/VS can hold onto things (like deleted files referenced by ItemGroup markup). shrug –  Ritch Melton May 20 '11 at 1:13
    
Most. confusing. issue. Ever. –  thaBadDawg May 20 '11 at 3:15
    
I described the problem to a co-worker saying something like, "This defies what I know about programming." –  RacerNerd Apr 9 '13 at 17:40
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Is the other library using a project reference or a binary reference? If its a binary reference, are you sure its using the latest build?

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I'm using it as the project reference, and I've cleaned out the compiled output a couple times thinking that this might be the issue. –  thaBadDawg May 18 '11 at 21:04
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Check the reference path of the project that's generating the error; make sure you're either referencing the library project (if it's part of your solution) or the most recent build of the library (if it's not.)

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I've gotten stuck in a few situations like this before. Here's what worked for me:

Are those two samples of code in separate projects? If so, I would say to try rebuilding the first project (containing the UserInfo class), then take out the line that fails the compilation out and try rebuilding the second project. Then do a rebuild all. Then add the offending line back in and do a rebuild all.

May not work for you, but worth a shot. I know that situation is frustrating.

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Saying that the situation is frustrating is an understatement. I'm ready to throw my computer through the window. –  thaBadDawg May 18 '11 at 21:24
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for me -- try to recreate the line that shows an issue. Write the name of the object period (.) and wait for VS to show you the list of available properi

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I encountered a very similar problem.

In my case I have a piece of code that I only need to run a couple times a year. When I attempted to use it there was an error accessing a Member. Nothing should have changed since the last time I used the code. Intellisense was detecting the member when using the '.' in Visual Studio. I restarted Visual Studio and the computer but the problem stayed.

In the end to fix my problem, I created a new file, copied the code from the original to the new file, and that was it. No code modifications. I used Ctrl-C, Ctrl-V so the content wasn't corrected by a manual touch. This isn't the first time copy and paste has fixed a bug so it's worth keeping the idea in the tool chest.

Sometimes a mysterious problem demands an equally mysterious solution.

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In my case, it was a problem with the web application's project properties. To fix it, I did the following:

  1. Right-click the project > click Properties.
  2. On the Build tab, change the Output path value for all configurations to: bin\

Previously, my output path had been bin\Debug or bin\Release depending on which configuration I was looking at. I don't know why this screwed with my markup page's ability to see methods in my codebehind, but it did. Once I changed this, the error disappeared.

This was in VS2012 w/ update 2.

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