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I have an open source iOS application that uses custom OpenGL ES 2.0 shaders to display 3-D representations of molecular structures. It does this by using procedurally generated sphere and cylinder impostors drawn over rectangles, instead of these same shapes built using lots of vertices. The downside to this approach is that the depth values for each fragment of these impostor objects needs to be calculated in a fragment shader, to be used when objects overlap.

Unfortunately, OpenGL ES 2.0 does not let you write to gl_FragDepth, so I've needed to output these values to a custom depth texture. I do a pass over my scene using a framebuffer object (FBO), only rendering out a color that corresponds to a depth value, with the results being stored into a texture. This texture is then loaded into the second half of my rendering process, where the actual screen image is generated. If a fragment at that stage is at the depth level stored in the depth texture for that point on the screen, it is displayed. If not, it is tossed. More about the process, including diagrams, can be found in my post here.

The generation of this depth texture is a bottleneck in my rendering process and I'm looking for a way to make it faster. It seems slower than it should be, but I can't figure out why. In order to achieve the proper generation of this depth texture, GL_DEPTH_TEST is disabled, GL_BLEND is enabled with glBlendFunc(GL_ONE, GL_ONE), and glBlendEquation() is set to GL_MIN_EXT. I know that a scene output in this manner isn't the fastest on a tile-based deferred renderer like the PowerVR series in iOS devices, but I can't think of a better way to do this.

My depth fragment shader for spheres (the most common display element) looks to be at the heart of this bottleneck (Renderer Utilization in Instruments is pegged at 99%, indicating that I'm limited by fragment processing). It currently looks like the following:

precision mediump float;

varying mediump vec2 impostorSpaceCoordinate;
varying mediump float normalizedDepth;
varying mediump float adjustedSphereRadius;

const vec3 stepValues = vec3(2.0, 1.0, 0.0);
const float scaleDownFactor = 1.0 / 255.0;

void main()
{
    float distanceFromCenter = length(impostorSpaceCoordinate);
    if (distanceFromCenter > 1.0)
    {
        gl_FragColor = vec4(1.0);
    }
    else
    {
        float calculatedDepth = sqrt(1.0 - distanceFromCenter * distanceFromCenter);
        mediump float currentDepthValue = normalizedDepth - adjustedSphereRadius * calculatedDepth;

        // Inlined color encoding for the depth values
        float ceiledValue = ceil(currentDepthValue * 765.0);

        vec3 intDepthValue = (vec3(ceiledValue) * scaleDownFactor) - stepValues;

        gl_FragColor = vec4(intDepthValue, 1.0);
    }
}

On an iPad 1, this takes 35 - 68 ms to render a frame of a DNA spacefilling model using a passthrough shader for display (18 to 35 ms on iPhone 4). According to the PowerVR PVRUniSCo compiler (part of their SDK), this shader uses 11 GPU cycles at best, 16 cycles at worst. I'm aware that you're advised not to use branching in a shader, but in this case that led to better performance than otherwise.

When I simplify it to

precision mediump float;

varying mediump vec2 impostorSpaceCoordinate;
varying mediump float normalizedDepth;
varying mediump float adjustedSphereRadius;

void main()
{
    gl_FragColor = vec4(adjustedSphereRadius * normalizedDepth * (impostorSpaceCoordinate + 1.0) / 2.0, normalizedDepth, 1.0);
}

it takes 18 - 35 ms on iPad 1, but only 1.7 - 2.4 ms on iPhone 4. The estimated GPU cycle count for this shader is 8 cycles. The change in render time based on cycle count doesn't seem linear.

Finally, if I just output a constant color:

precision mediump float;

void main()
{
    gl_FragColor = vec4(0.5, 0.5, 0.5, 1.0);
}

the rendering time drops to 1.1 - 2.3 ms on iPad 1 (1.3 ms on iPhone 4).

The nonlinear scaling in rendering time and sudden change between iPad and iPhone 4 for the second shader makes me think that there's something I'm missing here. A full source project containing these three shader variants (look in the SphereDepth.fsh file and comment out the appropriate sections) and a test model can be downloaded from here, if you wish to try this out yourself.

If you've read this far, my question is: based on this profiling information, how can I improve the rendering performance of my custom depth shader on iOS devices?

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There were posts about conditions in shader. You have to avoid conditions in shader –  Yuriy Vikulov May 19 '11 at 3:01
    
@Joe - It's hard to benchmark overall, because it is way faster than the above devices, so it's rendering the test model at 60 FPS anyway. It rarely has trouble with any models I throw at it, so I'm focusing my efforts on the slower devices. –  Brad Larson May 29 '11 at 22:41
    
I learned quite a bit just reading over this Q&A. Thanks for following up and being thorough with code and diagrams. (upvoted) –  mpstx Apr 5 '13 at 12:56
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4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Based on the recommendations by Tommy, Pivot, and rotoglup, I've implemented some optimizations which have led to a doubling of the rendering speed for the both the depth texture generation and the overall rendering pipeline in the application.

First, I re-enabled the precalculated sphere depth and lighting texture that I'd used before with little effect, only now I use proper lowp precision values when handling the colors and other values from that texture. This combination, along with proper mipmapping for the texture, seems to yield a ~10% performance boost.

More importantly, I now do a pass before rendering both my depth texture and the final raytraced impostors where I lay down some opaque geometry to block pixels that would never be rendered. To do this, I enable depth testing and then draw out the squares that make up the objects in my scene, shrunken by sqrt(2) / 2, with a simple opaque shader. This will create inset squares covering area known to be opaque in a represented sphere.

I then disable depth writes using glDepthMask(GL_FALSE) and render the square sphere impostor at a location closer to the user by one radius. This allows the tile-based deferred rendering hardware in the iOS devices to efficiently strip out fragments that would never appear onscreen under any conditions, yet still give smooth intersections between the visible sphere impostors based on per-pixel depth values. This is depicted in my crude illustration below:

Layered spheres and opacity testing

In this example, the opaque blocking squares for the top two impostors do not prevent any of the fragments from those visible objects from being rendered, yet they block a chunk of the fragments from the lowest impostor. The frontmost impostors can then use per-pixel tests to generate a smooth intersection, while many of the pixels from the rear impostor don't waste GPU cycles by being rendered.

I hadn't thought to disable depth writes, yet leave on depth testing when doing the last rendering stage. This is the key to preventing the impostors from simply stacking on one another, yet still using some of the hardware optimizations within the PowerVR GPUs.

In my benchmarks, rendering the test model I used above yields times of 18 - 35 ms per frame, as compared to the 35 - 68 ms I was getting previously, a near doubling in rendering speed. Applying this same opaque geometry pre-rendering to the raytracing pass yields a doubling in overall rendering performance.

Oddly, when I tried to refine this further by using inset and circumscribed octagons, which should cover ~17% fewer pixels when drawn, and be more efficient with blocking fragments, performance was actually worse than when using simple squares for this. Tiler utilization was still less than 60% in the worst case, so maybe the larger geometry was resulting in more cache misses.

EDIT (5/31/2011):

Based on Pivot's suggestion, I created inscribed and circumscribed octagons to use instead of my rectangles, only I followed the recommendations here for optimizing triangles for rasterization. In previous testing, octagons yielded worse performance than squares, despite removing many unnecessary fragments and letting you block covered fragments more efficiently. By adjusting the triangle drawing as follows:

Rasterization optimizing octagons

I was able to reduce overall rendering time by an average of 14% on top of the above-described optimizations by switching to octagons from squares. The depth texture is now generated in 19 ms, with occasional dips to 2 ms and spikes to 35 ms.

EDIT 2 (5/31/2011):

I've revisited Tommy's idea of using the step function, now that I have fewer fragments to discard due to the octagons. This, combined with a depth lookup texture for the sphere, now leads to a 2 ms average rendering time on the iPad 1 for the depth texture generation for my test model. I consider that to be about as good as I could hope for in this rendering case, and a giant improvement from where I started. For posterity, here is the depth shader I'm now using:

precision mediump float;

varying mediump vec2 impostorSpaceCoordinate;
varying mediump float normalizedDepth;
varying mediump float adjustedSphereRadius;
varying mediump vec2 depthLookupCoordinate;

uniform lowp sampler2D sphereDepthMap;

const lowp vec3 stepValues = vec3(2.0, 1.0, 0.0);

void main()
{
    lowp vec2 precalculatedDepthAndAlpha = texture2D(sphereDepthMap, depthLookupCoordinate).ra;

    float inCircleMultiplier = step(0.5, precalculatedDepthAndAlpha.g);

    float currentDepthValue = normalizedDepth + adjustedSphereRadius - adjustedSphereRadius * precalculatedDepthAndAlpha.r;

    // Inlined color encoding for the depth values
    currentDepthValue = currentDepthValue * 3.0;

    lowp vec3 intDepthValue = vec3(currentDepthValue) - stepValues;

    gl_FragColor = vec4(1.0 - inCircleMultiplier) + vec4(intDepthValue, inCircleMultiplier);
}

I've updated the testing sample here, if you wish to see this new approach in action as compared to what I was doing initially.

I'm still open to other suggestions, but this is a huge step forward for this application.

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On the desktop, it was the case on many early programmable devices that while they could process 8 or 16 or whatever fragments simultaneously, they effectively had only one program counter for the lot of them (since that also implies only one fetch/decode unit and one of everything else, as long as they work in units of 8 or 16 pixels). Hence the initial prohibition on conditionals and, for a while after that, the situation where if the conditional evaluations for pixels that would be processed together returned different values, those pixels would be processed in smaller groups in some arrangement.

Although PowerVR aren't explicit, their application development recommendations have a section on flow control and make a lot of recommendations about dynamic branches usually being a good idea only where the result is reasonably predictable, which makes me think they're getting at the same sort of thing. I'd therefore suggest that the speed disparity may be because you've included a conditional.

As a first test, what happens if you try the following?

void main()
{
    float distanceFromCenter = length(impostorSpaceCoordinate);

    // the step function doesn't count as a conditional
    float inCircleMultiplier = step(distanceFromCenter, 1.0);

    float calculatedDepth = sqrt(1.0 - distanceFromCenter * distanceFromCenter * inCircleMultiplier);
    mediump float currentDepthValue = normalizedDepth - adjustedSphereRadius * calculatedDepth;

    // Inlined color encoding for the depth values
    float ceiledValue = ceil(currentDepthValue * 765.0) * inCircleMultiplier;

    vec3 intDepthValue = (vec3(ceiledValue) * scaleDownFactor) - (stepValues * inCircleMultiplier);

     // use the result of the step to combine results
    gl_FragColor = vec4(1.0 - inCircleMultiplier) + vec4(intDepthValue, inCircleMultiplier);

}
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I needed to tweak the shader code to get it to render properly (the negative square root was causing fragments to go black outside of the circle), and I slightly optimized the ordering, so I edited your shader to reflect what I ended up trying. The step was a very good idea, but unfortunately on an iPad 1 it led to 51 - 69 ms per frame (18 - 35 ms on iPhone 4), so it ended being neutral or a step backwards in performance on the actual device. According to the compiler, the above code uses an estimated 20 GPU cycles in best and worst cases. It was worth a try, though. –  Brad Larson May 18 '11 at 23:17
1  
I'm running low on ideas, but is there any way you could split your geometry into parts that are definitely opaque and bits that may or may not be opaque? You could use a conventional z-buffer to draw the former front to back (ish) and hopefully save on some fragment costs, then draw the others in any old order with the depth buffer disabled, still to get the correct colour results that you turn into another depth buffer later on. –  Tommy May 19 '11 at 11:01
1  
Do it in two passes then? Pass 1: position the definitely opaque geometry at the closest position the sphere can be, draw it with colour writes enabled, depth reads enabled but depth writes disabled. Pass 2: push the geometry back to the furthest position the sphere can be, disable colour writes (and set a uniform to move to a simplified shader path if the fragment costs accumulate nevertheless), enable depth reads and writes. –  Tommy May 19 '11 at 23:20
1  
Actually, probably smarter to do the scene in two passes. Pass 1: no colour writes, depth buffer read and writes, definitely opaque sections, each GL geometry depth being the furthest a sphere can be. Pass 2: colour writes, depth buffer reads only, all sections, each GL geometry depth being the closest a sphere can be. –  Tommy May 20 '11 at 8:15
1  
Also, after implementing Pivot's suggestions for raster-optimized octagons for this geometry, I revisited your step function shader. Combined with a depth texture lookup, the use of the step function was able to drop my rendering time down to 2.4 ms per depth texture frame from about 19 ms without. The number of fragments that benefited from the reduced overhead by removing branching must now vastly outweigh the fragments that could abort processing early. –  Brad Larson May 31 '11 at 20:37
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Many of these points have been covered by others who have posted answers, but the overarching theme here is that your rendering does a lot of work that will be thrown away:

  1. The shader itself does some potentially redundant work. The length of a vector is likely to be calculated as sqrt(dot(vector, vector)). You don’t need the sqrt to reject fragments outside of the circle, and you’re squaring the length to calculate the depth, anyway. Additionally, have you looked at whether or not explicit quantization of the depth values is actually necessary, or can you get away with just using the hardware’s conversion from floating-point to integer for the framebuffer (potentially with an additional bias to make sure your quasi-depth tests come out right later)?

  2. Many fragments are trivially outside the circle. Only π/4 of the area of the quads you’re drawing produce useful depth values. At this point, I imagine your app is heavily skewed towards fragment processing, so you may want to consider increasing the number of vertices you draw in exchange for a reduction in the area that you have to shade. Since you’re drawing spheres through an orthographic projection, any circumscribing regular polygon will do, although you may need a little extra size depending on zoom level to make sure you rasterize enough pixels.

  3. Many fragments are trivially occluded by other fragments. As others have pointed out, you’re not using hardware depth test, and therefore not taking full advantage of a TBDR’s ability to kill shading work early. If you’ve already implemented something for 2), all you need to do is draw an inscribed regular polygon at the maximum depth that you can generate (a plane through the middle of the sphere), and draw your real polygon at the minimum depth (the front of the sphere). Both Tommy’s and rotoglup’s posts already contain the state vector specifics.

Note that 2) and 3) apply to your raytracing shaders as well.

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Thanks for the tips. I ended giving Tommy the bounty, because his explicit description of the prerendering depth write pass was exactly what I ended up doing (see my answer for more). Also, I did experiment with using inset and circumscribed octagons for my impostors, but they led to lower overall performance than the simple squares did. I'm still investigating why, as this would seem to be a clear win by eliminating ~17% of the fragments to be drawn. –  Brad Larson May 29 '11 at 22:53
1  
I haven’t had a chance to play with this on an actual device, but I see from the posted source that you’re triangulating using a fan around the center point, which is suboptimal for rasterization. I’d be interested as to whether or not a triangulation scheme like the one described in the link would work better, since this would be equivalent to starting from your inscribed square and adding 4 additional blocking pieces. –  Pivot May 30 '11 at 0:28
    
Great catch. That appears to be the exact case here, because when I changed the triangle drawing order (as shown in my updated answer) from the centered fans to a more "greedy" version, octagons went from being slower than squares to 14% faster. I had no idea that this would make such a difference on rasterization, so thanks for pointing it out. –  Brad Larson May 31 '11 at 18:16
    
@Brad Larson: That's great news. Can you shave off more area still by using a regular octagon instead of the slightly-uneven one you have now? –  Pivot May 31 '11 at 18:46
    
Unless I screwed up my calculations, I'm using a regular octagon in my code. The drawing in my answer is just a quick-and-dirty thing I threw together in OmniGraffle, so don't go by the dimensions of that. –  Brad Larson May 31 '11 at 19:36
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I'm no mobile platform expert at all, but I think that what bites you is that:

  • your depth shader is quite expensive
  • experience massive overdraw in your depth pass as you disable GL_DEPTH test

Wouldn't an additional pass, drawn before the depth test be helpful ?

This pass could do a GL_DEPTH prefill, for example by drawing each sphere represented as quad facing camera (or a cube, that may be easier to setup), and contained in the associated sphere. This pass could be drawn without color mask or fragment shader, just with GL_DEPTH_TEST and glDepthMask enabled. On desktop platforms, these kind of passes get drawn faster than color + depth passes.

Then in you depth computation pass, you could enable GL_DEPTH_TEST and disable glDepthMask, this way your shader would not be executed on pixels that are hidden by nearer geometry.

This solution would involve issuing another set of draw calls, so this may not be beneficial.

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