Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am programmatically creating PDF files in Python and Reportlab Toolkit, each containing several thousand documents, each document with a variable amount of pages.

My problem is that I need to instruct the printer which media type each page should be printed on (pre-printed letterhead for the first page of a document for example). It seems that I need to generate some kind of job ticket which hold this kind of information.

I've had some success with creating JDF job tickets, but these only run on my organisation's newest printers which run Xerox Freeflow Server version 8.

Ideally, I need a solution which also works with our Freeflow server version 7 and Xerox DocuSP printers. I have tried unsuccessfully to send JDF tickets to these printers.

Is there another type of ticketing system I could use, or a way to get all of our printers recognising JDF files?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

I've run into the same problem. Eventually, I found out that I was going about it the wrong way, caused by a misunderstanding of the PDF format. We think of PDF files as WYSIWYG for printers. This is not the case. In any kind of print flow, the PDF file gets converted to some intermediate format, PostScript, TIFF images, or PCL usually.

This may happen on your local machine, which is why you need a driver, or on the printer itself. If it happens on the printer, you are just transferring your PDF file to a different computer with the appropriate conversion system set up.

This is all fine and dandy, except that PDF does not define page order which is very counterintuitive for a print ready format. This means there is no first page of your document and you won't be able to natively define it in any way shape or form.

You have two solutions:

  1. Pick a printer architecture and use its unique method of setting the media type, which is a pain, and nonportable.

  2. Convert to a format that allows for setting media type and includes the idea of page ordering, such as PostScript. Then add in your media commands and send this file along to your printer. If your printer has a driver for reading your chosen intermediate format, it should convert the commands to its version of media switching. This is more portable but still not perfect.

This is similar to the idea of converting your C program to assembly to port it to a new architecture. It mostly works, but you have to fiddle each system into operation.

A hypothetical pipeline would be:

Create your PDF file > run it through a PDF-to-PostScript conversion utility or library > run through a custom lexer to add media type commands at each new page > send to PostScript file to printer

It's a lot of work, but that's about the only thing your going to find that will solve your problem.

Sample

%{
char paper[] = 'yourPaper';
%}
%option 8bit outfile="scanner.c"
%option nounput nomain noyywrap
%option warn

%%
showpage { printf("showpage\nsetpagedevice MediaType '%s'", paper); }
%%
int main(int argc, char **argv);

int main (argc,argv)
int argc;
char **argv;
{
    yylex();
    return 0;
}

The above is a very simplistic lexer to find every showpage command obtained from stdin and output a showpage setpagedevice command set. The setpagedevice MediaType command is the printer agnostic way of setting the type of paper to use for a page.

To compile the code using flex and GCC:

flex -Cf scanner.l
gcc -O -o lineCount.exe scanner.c

It accepts input via stdin and outputs to stdout.

A more complete lexer is listed below. It uses GNU getopts for command line options, and has two rules, so that it will set the page device for the first page as well. It may not perfectly grab the pages, and it only has one variable for the paper type, so the functionality is limited. On the other hand, it is very open for however you want it to determine the page device to use.

Either new rules to recognize what type of page it is looking at, or an additional input file with one line per page are the two that come to mind immediately.

/*
 * This file is part of flex.
 *
 * Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
 * modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
 * are met:
 *
 * 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
 *    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
 * 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
 *    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
 *    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
 *
 * Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors
 * may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
 * without specific prior written permission.
 *
 * THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS'' AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR
 * IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED
 * WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
 * PURPOSE.
 */

     /**************************************************
        Start of definitions section

    ***************************************************/

%{
/* A template scanner file to build "scanner.c". */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <getopt.h>
/*#include "parser.h" */

//put your variables here
char FileName[256];
FILE *outfile;
char inputName[256];
char paper[] = 'yourPaper';

// flags for command line options
static int specificFile_flag = 0;
static int output_flag = 0;
static int help_flag = 0;

%}


%option 8bit outfile="scanner.c"
%option nounput nomain noyywrap
%option warn

%%
    /************************************************
        start of rules section

    *************************************************/


    /* These flex patterns will eat all input */
EndSetup { printf("showpage\nsetpagedevice MediaType '%s'", paper); }
showpage { printf("showpage\nsetpagedevice MediaType '%s'", paper); }


%%
    /****************************************************
        Start of code section


    *****************************************************/

int main(int argc, char **argv);

int main (argc,argv)
int argc;
char **argv;
{
    /****************************************************
        The main method drives the program. It gets the filename from the
        command line, and opens the initial files to write to. Then it calls the lexer.
        After the lexer returns, the main method finishes out the report file,
        closes all of the open files, and prints out to the command line to let the
        user know it is finished.
    ****************************************************/

    int c;

    // The GNU getopt library is used to parse the command line for flags
    // afterwards, the final option is assumed to be the input file

    while (1) {
        static struct option long_options[] = {
            /* These options set a flag. */
            {"help",   no_argument,     &help_flag, 1},
            /* These options don't set a flag. We distinguish them by their indices. */

            {"useStdOut", no_argument,       0, 'o'},
            {0, 0, 0, 0}
        };
           /* getopt_long stores the option index here. */
        int option_index = 0;
        c = getopt_long (argc, argv, "o",
            long_options, &option_index);

        /* Detect the end of the options. */
        if (c == -1)
            break;

        switch (c) {
            case 0:
               /* If this option set a flag, do nothing else now. */
               if (long_options[option_index].flag != 0)
                 break;
               printf ("option %s", long_options[option_index].name);
               if (optarg)
                 printf (" with arg %s", optarg);
               printf ("\n");
               break;

            case 'o':
               output_flag = 1;
               break;


            case '?':
               /* getopt_long already printed an error message. */
               break;

            default:
               abort ();
            }
    }

    if (help_flag == 1) {
        printf("proper syntax is: traySwitch.exe [OPTIONS]... INFILE OUTFILE\n");
        printf("adds tray switching information to postscript file\n\n");
        printf("Option list: \n");
        printf("-o                        sets output to stdout\n");
        printf("--help                   print help to screen\n");
        printf("\n");
        printf("inputfile example: traySwitch.exe test.ps\n");
        printf("If infile is left out, then stdin is used for input.\n");
        printf("If outfile is a filename, then that file is used.\n");
        printf("If there is no outfile, then infile-EDIT.ps is used.\n");
        printf("There cannot be an outfile without an infile.\n");
        return 0;
    }

    //Get the filename off the command line and redirect it to input
    //if there is no filename or it is a - then use stdin.


    if (optind < argc) {
        FILE *file;

        file = fopen(argv[optind], "rb");
        if (!file) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Flex could not open %s\n",argv[optind]);
            exit(1);
        }
        yyin = file;
        strcpy(inputName, argv[optind]);
    }
    else {
        printf("no input file set, using stdin. Press ctrl-c to quit");
        yyin = stdin;
        strcpy(inputName, "\b\b\b\b\bagainst stdin");
    }

    //Increment current place in argument list
    optind++;


    /********************************************
        If no input name, then output set to stdout.
        If no output name then copy input name and add -EDIT.csv.
        If input name is '-' then output set to stdout,
        otherwise use output name.

    *********************************************/
    if (optind > argc) {
        yyout = stdout;
    }
    else if (output_flag == 1) {
        yyout = stdout;
    }
    else if (optind < argc){
        outfile = fopen(argv[optind], "wb");
        if (!outfile) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Flex could not open %s\n",FileName);
            exit(1);
        }
        yyout = outfile;
    }
    else {
        strncpy(FileName, argv[optind-1], strlen(argv[optind-1])-4);
        FileName[strlen(argv[optind-1])-4] = '\0';
        strcat(FileName, "-EDIT.ps");
        outfile = fopen(FileName, "wb");
        if (!outfile) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Flex could not open %s\n",FileName);
            exit(1);
        }
        yyout = outfile;
    }

    yylex();
    if (output_flag == 0) {
        fclose(yyout);
    }
    printf("Flex program finished running file %s\n", inputName);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I hadn't thought of adding the setpagedevice intruction after converting to PS. That may be an option, and I should be able to automate that. Reportlab can add these postscript instructions directly to the PDF file but they are only retained if you print or export from Acrobat version 4. Not exactly something that works for a long running automated job. I'll let the bounty stand for a while longer and see what turns up, but this is very helpful. –  nakedfanatic May 23 '11 at 21:25
add comment

You should ask your printer vendor (Xerox) for their specifications regarding the scope of JDF support for their DocuSp printers.

You may be lucky and get the info.

There is no other standardized way of job ticketing than JDF. There are several other vendor-specific ways, and Xerox may well have their own. Ask them.

share|improve this answer
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I received this response from "RogerK-Xerox" on the Xerox support forum.

Xerox uses an XML based ticketing system called Xerox Printing Instruction Format (XPIF). You can get an idea of how this format works by opening your Xerox custom print driver, programming some printing attributes, and then exporting the Xerox Job Ticket. This is accomplished by selecting the Advanced tab on the print driver, selecting the '+' next the Xerox Job Ticket and choosing 'Export Xerox Job Ticket...' and then pressing the 'Export...' button.

In order to get full access the the XPIF programming guide I believe that you have to register on http://www.xerox-solutions.net/Partners

I tried the above, and it did produce an XML file with job ticket instructions, which could presumably be re-loaded in the print driver. Now I'm looking for a way to use these files with printer hot folders, which is more in line with our current work-flow. The printer would need to know somehow which XPIF ticket belonged with which PDF file.

It seems that the XPIF file can be added to the beginning of a PDF file by simply concatenating the two files. The file can then be dragged into a hotfolder and the Xerox printer knows how to separate a job ticket from PDF.

I have tested this method, and it works as expected :-). Appending some arbitrary XML data to the beginning of a PDF file renders it un-openable in Adobe Acrobat. Surprisingly though, such files open just fine in Evince Document Viewer.

share|improve this answer
    
Telling the printer which 'set' of files goes together has its own headaches. I'd suggest you avoid it, especially because it will only work on these specific printers. If your company wants to use something else later because of price or performance, your whole solution and workflow goes right out the window. –  Spencer Rathbun May 24 '11 at 14:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.