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//get the current member count
$sql = ("SELECT count(member_id) as total_members from exp_members");
$result = mysql_query($sql) or die(mysql_error());
$num_rows = mysql_num_rows($result);
if ($num_rows != 0) {
    while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)) {
        $total_members = $row['total_members'];
    }
}

//get list of products
$sql = ("SELECT m_field_id, m_field_label from exp_member_fields where m_field_name like 'cf_member_ap_%' order by m_field_id asc");
$result = mysql_query($sql) or die(mysql_error());
$num_rows = mysql_num_rows($result);

if ($num_rows != 0) {

    while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)) {

        $m_field_id             = $row['m_field_id'];
        $m_field_label          = $row['m_field_label'];

        $sql2 = ("SELECT count(m_field_id_".$m_field_id.") as count from exp_member_data where m_field_id_".$m_field_id." = 'y'");
        $result2 = mysql_query($sql2) or die(mysql_error());
        $num_rows2 = mysql_num_rows($result2);

        if ($num_rows2 != 0) {
            while($row2 = mysql_fetch_array($result2)) {
                $p = ($row2['count']/$total_members)*100;
                $n = $row2['count'];
                $out .= '<tr><td>'.$m_field_label.'</td><td>'.number_format($p,1).'%</td><td>'.$n.'</td></tr>';
            }
        }

    }


}
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What are your table definitions (including indexes)? –  Ted Hopp May 19 '11 at 0:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

count query would always return 1 row, so you don't need the loop

$sql = ("SELECT count(member_id) as total_members from exp_members");
$result = mysql_query($sql) or die(mysql_error());
$row = mysql_fetch_array($result);
$total_members = $row['total_members'];

Other than that i am not sure how you can make it better. You can do the same for both of your count queries.

As these are straight forward queries, any bottleneck i guess now would be on the MySQL end

share|improve this answer

It's easier to help if you can describe in non-code terms what you're trying to accomplish. But one indicator of a problem is seeing a php loop on rows from one query with another query executing for each row.

There are ways to query for subtotals. But it would be easier to explain if you can explain the goal a bit.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess the part I would like to try to make better is getting the product list and then running a query for each product to get the count of users who have 'y' in that product's column. It's not running slow, per se, its fine, and we're caching the results. I was just wondering if I can make it less intensive on the system. –  Chad Crowell May 19 '11 at 0:56
    
Essentially in the exp_member_data table we have rows with member_id and obviously 1 row for each member. There are about 300,000 members. In the same table is a column for each product. The cells either say 'n' or 'y' if they don't or do use the product. –  Chad Crowell May 19 '11 at 0:59
    
The product names are in a table called exp_member_fields. Each row in this table represents a custom member field. So, I want to grab the unique ID's (X) along with the product label from this table for all the rows that represent a product and then get the count of rows with 'y' from the exp_member_data table where the column (m_field_id_X) is related to the row id from exp_member_fields table. –  Chad Crowell May 19 '11 at 1:03

The first COUNT query ("get the current member count") should execute almost instantaneously.

The second query ("get list of products") may be slow depending on your indexes. You are querying on m_field_name and then ordering on m_field_id so you may need a combined index of the two.

The third query, which is executed repeatedly (once for each product), is querying on m_field_id_* (i.e. any of a number of possible fields), so you should probably make sure they are indexed.

In summary, you need to a) figure out which query is running slow, b) index things that need to be indexed, and c) combine queries if possible.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no m_field_id_* in any query –  Chad Crowell May 19 '11 at 1:03
    
The asterisk (*) is common shorthand for "wildcard" or "match anything". You have this in your query: m_field_id_".$m_field_id –  dkamins May 19 '11 at 1:15

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