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I have two tables - `employee` and `department`. 

1. `employee` table contains column id,employee name and dept_id
2. `department` table contains column id, department name.

I need exact department name which contains 

1. maximum employee and 
2. no employee

Edited:

Apologizing for bad grammar, here is the example for above two questions what i need.
1. for eg: if two department contains same number of employees, i need to show both department not single by limit.
2. for eg: if more than one department contains 0 employees, i must show those departments particularly.
share|improve this question
    
@Harry Joy: Subject line says "I need help with a MySQL query." –  mellamokb May 19 '11 at 4:54
    
He's using MySQL (notice the tag). That said, What do you mean by "maximum employee" and "no employee"? –  Luke Sneeringer May 19 '11 at 4:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Answer to the first question:

WITH epcount(dept_id, ep_count) AS
(
    SELECT dept_id, COUNT(*) AS ep_count
        FROM employee
        GROUP BY dept_id
)
SELECT d.name FROM epcount AS ec1 JOIN department AS d ON ec1.dept_id=d.id
    WHERE NOT EXISTS
        (SELECT * FROM epcount AS ec2 WHERE ec1.ep_count < ec2.ep_count)

Answer to the second question:

SELECT name FROM department AS d
    WHERE NOT EXISTS
        (SELECT * FROM  employee AS e WHERE d.id=e.dept_id)
share|improve this answer
    
I just noticed that the asker is looking for MySQL solution. My answer to the first query used some SQL Server syntax. Any way, except the WITH clause creating epcount temporary table, the idea about how to write such a query's WHERE clause is all the same. –  Liu Yongtai May 19 '11 at 6:44
select department_name as `department name`, 
       count(*) as `number of employees`
from employee 
        inner join department 
            on employee.dept_id = department.id
group by department_name
order by count(*) desc
limit 1

i think that should do it. i've not done anything with mysql in a while.

edit: missed the second question

select department_name as `department name`, 
       count(*) as `number of employees`
from employee 
        left join department 
            on employee.dept_id = department.id
group by department_name
  HAVING count(*) = 0
share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't it having count(*) = 0 instead of where? techonthenet.com/sql/having.php –  Nikita Barsukov May 19 '11 at 5:03
    
@Nikita Barsukov: You are correct –  OMG Ponies May 19 '11 at 5:07
    
@Nikita, yep. thanks. –  nathan gonzalez May 19 '11 at 5:08
    
The first query is incorrect. It currently returns the first dept that contains the maximum number of employees. Not all the depts that contain that number. The second is incorrect too: the join ensures it'll return no rows. –  Denis May 19 '11 at 5:08
    
@Denis, to the second point i will concede. things done in haste, blah blah blah. to the first, it is a matter of opinion. he asked for the department, singular, and that is how i wrote it. –  nathan gonzalez May 19 '11 at 5:12

If I read the question right, you need:

select department_name,
       count(employee.dept_id) as num_employees
from department
left join employee on employee.dept_id = department.id
group by department_name
having count(employee.dept_id) = 0 or
       count(employee.dept_id) = (select count(dept_id)
                   from employee
                   group by employee.id
                   order by count(dept_id) desc
                   limit 1)
share|improve this answer
    
i both like and don't like this answer. it is exactly what the op asked for. –  nathan gonzalez May 19 '11 at 5:09
    
I find it ugly too. :-) –  Denis May 19 '11 at 5:12

This will get you a sorted list of departments, sorted by number of employees.

SELECT `dept`.`id`, `dept`.`name`, COUNT(`employee`.`id`) as `employee_count`
    FROM `dept` LEFT JOIN `employee`
        ON `employee`.`dept_id` = `dept`.`id`
    GROUP BY `dept`.`id`
    ORDER BY `employee_count`

To get departments with no employees, add:

AND `employee_count` = 0

...before the GROUP BY.

To get the department with the most employees, add DESC LIMIT 1 to the end.

share|improve this answer
    
Desc limit 1 to the end is incorrect. It currently returns the first dept that contains the maximum number of employees. Not all the depts that contain that number. As is the employee_count clause, since the join makes it return no rows. –  Denis May 19 '11 at 5:10
    
Edited to make it a LEFT JOIN. The question suggests that only one department contains the maximum number of rows (although that might just be the OP's poor grammar). I admit the imprecision here, and figure the OP can select based on his needs. Thanks for the correction, by the way! :) –  Luke Sneeringer May 19 '11 at 5:12

Query that shows department names with maximum employees and number of employees in it:

SELECT department.name, COUNT(employee.name) from department
 INNER JOIN employee
 ON employee.dept_id = department.id
 GROUP BY department.name
 ORDER BY COUNT(employee.name) DESC limit 1

Query that shows departments with no employees:

SELECT department.name from department
 LEFT JOIN employee
 ON employee.dept_id = department.id
 HAVING COUNT(employee.name) = 0
 GROUP BY department.name

If you need to show it in one query, paste first query, add UNION ALL and then paste second query.

share|improve this answer
    
The first query is incorrect. It currently returns the first dept that contains the maximum number of employees. Not all the depts that contain that number. –  Denis May 19 '11 at 5:10
    
@Denis - it turned out to be incorrect after OP edited his question. stackoverflow.com/revisions/… –  Nikita Barsukov May 19 '11 at 6:52

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