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How do I print the time (in ms) in a Windows batch file?

I want to measure the time that passes between lines in my batch file, but Windows's "time /T" does not print milliseconds.

echo %time% won't help because it's evaluated just once and thus prints the same time every time.

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5 Answers

up vote 39 down vote accepted

%time% should work, provided enough time has elapsed between calls:

@echo OFF

@echo %time%
ping -n 1 -w 1 127.0.0.1 1>nul
@echo %time%

On my system I get the following output:

6:46:13.50
6:46:13.60

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1  
On my machine it shows the same time even if I sleep between calls. –  Assaf Lavie Mar 3 '09 at 13:19
    
Can you post the code for the batch file that you're trying to profile? –  Patrick Cuff Mar 3 '09 at 14:58
    
nm, I'm an idiot. :) –  Assaf Lavie Mar 3 '09 at 16:12
9  
I doubt that :) What was the issue? Would sharing it here help others who run into the same thing? –  Patrick Cuff Mar 3 '09 at 18:08
2  
I have the same problem that the time is always the same during the whole execution, even if the script runs for hours, it always display the time when the script started. –  MaxiWheat Dec 20 '11 at 14:13
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If you're doing something like

for /l %%i in (1,1,500) do @echo %time%

or

if foo (
    echo %time%
    do_something
    echo %time%
)

then you could simply put a setlocal enabledelayedexpansion at the beginning of your batch file and use !time! instead of %time% which gets evaluated on execution, not on parsing the line (which includes complete blocks enclosed in parentheses).

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Below batch "program" should do what you want. Please note that it outputs the data in centiseconds instead of milliseconds. The precision of the used commands is only centiseconds.

Here is an example output:

STARTTIME: 13:42:52,25
ENDTIME: 13:42:56,51
STARTTIME: 4937225 centiseconds
ENDTIME: 4937651 centiseconds
DURATION: 426 in centiseconds
00:00:04,26

Here is the batch script:

@echo off
setlocal

rem The format of %TIME% is HH:MM:SS,CS for example 23:59:59,99
set STARTTIME=%TIME%

rem here begins the command you want to measure
dir /s > nul
rem here ends the command you want to measure

set ENDTIME=%TIME%

rem output as time
echo STARTTIME: %STARTTIME%
echo ENDTIME: %ENDTIME%

rem convert STARTTIME and ENDTIME to centiseconds
set /A STARTTIME=(1%STARTTIME:~0,2%-100)*360000 + (1%STARTTIME:~3,2%-100)*6000 + (1%STARTTIME:~6,2%-100)*100 + (1%STARTTIME:~9,2%-100)
set /A ENDTIME=(1%ENDTIME:~0,2%-100)*360000 + (1%ENDTIME:~3,2%-100)*6000 + (1%ENDTIME:~6,2%-100)*100 + (1%ENDTIME:~9,2%-100)

rem calculating the duratyion is easy
set /A DURATION=%ENDTIME%-%STARTTIME%

rem we might have measured the time inbetween days
if %ENDTIME% LSS %STARTTIME% set set /A DURATION=%STARTTIME%-%ENDTIME%

rem now break the centiseconds down to hors, minutes, seconds and the remaining centiseconds
set /A DURATIONH=%DURATION% / 360000
set /A DURATIONM=(%DURATION% - %DURATIONH%*360000) / 6000
set /A DURATIONS=(%DURATION% - %DURATIONH%*360000 - %DURATIONM%*6000) / 100
set /A DURATIONHS=(%DURATION% - %DURATIONH%*360000 - %DURATIONM%*6000 - %DURATIONS%*100)

rem some formatting
if %DURATIONH% LSS 10 set DURATIONH=0%DURATIONH%
if %DURATIONM% LSS 10 set DURATIONM=0%DURATIONM%
if %DURATIONS% LSS 10 set DURATIONS=0%DURATIONS%
if %DURATIONHS% LSS 10 set DURATIONHS=0%DURATIONHS%

rem outputing
echo STARTTIME: %STARTTIME% centiseconds
echo ENDTIME: %ENDTIME% centiseconds
echo DURATION: %DURATION% in centiseconds
echo %DURATIONH%:%DURATIONM%:%DURATIONS%,%DURATIONHS%

endlocal
goto :EOF
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%TIME% is in the format H:MM:SS,CS after midnight and hence conversion to centiseconds doesn't work. Seeing Patrick Cuff's post with 6:46am it seems that it is not only me. –  Jaroslaw Pawlak Apr 1 '13 at 23:18
    
the (1%STARTTIME:~6,2%-100)*100 should be (1%STARTTIME:~6,2%-100)*1000 etc. –  Kvant Jun 8 at 13:31
    
the (1%STARTTIME:~9,2%-100) should be (1%STARTTIME:~9,2%-100) * 10 etc. –  Kvant Jun 8 at 13:33
    
Nice approach - liked it very much! :) –  Kvant Jun 8 at 13:36
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Maybe this tool could help? It doesn't return the time, but it is a good tool to measure the time a command takes.

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Thanks, +1 helpful. But still interesting why there's no simple time print in batch... –  Assaf Lavie Mar 3 '09 at 8:36
3  
I like this suggestion. Unfortunately without the name of the tool, when the link breaks (e.g. now) I can't see what you're talking about. –  Stephen Feb 14 '13 at 5:16
2  
I think it might've been timethis.exe (which, at the time of writing, seems to be available via this link. –  Henning Mar 6 '13 at 2:41
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%TIME% is in the format H:MM:SS,CS after midnight and hence conversion to centiseconds >doesn't work. Seeing Patrick Cuff's post with 6:46am it seems that it is not only me.

But with this lines bevor you should will fix that problem easy:

if " "=="%StartZeit:~0,1%" set StartZeit=0%StartZeit:~-10%
if " "=="%EndZeit:~0,1%" set EndZeit=0%EndZeit:~-10%

Thanks for your nice inspiration! I like to use it in my mplayer, ffmpeg, sox Scripts to pimp my mediafiles for old PocketPlayers just for fun.

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