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Can anyone explain why Codeblocks is giving me these errors?:

error: ISO C++ forbids declaration of 'cout' with no type
error: invalid use of '::'
error: expected ';' before '<<' token
error: '<<x>>' cannot appear in a constant-expression      // <<x>> is many different variable names

my code is literally as simple as:

#include <iostream>
#include "myclass.h"

int main(){
   std::string data;
   std::string e;

   e = myclass().run(data);
   std::cout << e << std::endl;

   return 0;
}

what in the world is going on?

EDIT: and yes, i do have iostream. sorry for not putting it there earlier

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2  
When dealing with compiler errors, it is better to solve them one by one from the beginning. In many cases one error will confuse the parser and some later diagnosed errors are not so (I am referring to the <<x>> part there, that might refer or not to real errors). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 19 '11 at 7:46
    
@calccrypto - about the edit - then show us what does myclass().run(data) do –  Kiril Kirov May 19 '11 at 7:48
    
myclass().run(data) returns a string –  calccrypto May 19 '11 at 7:48
1  
@calccrypto - if you remove (comment) e = myclass().run(data); and put a hardcoded string into e, does the error still appear ? –  Kiril Kirov May 19 '11 at 7:50
1  
@calccrypto - Show us what myclass.h contains. I'm pretty sure the problem is there (you'll see, that if you remove this include, the code will work perfect) –  Kiril Kirov May 19 '11 at 7:52

5 Answers 5

Add

#include <iostream>

std::cout is inside this header


EDIT: regarding your edit - this means, that the problem is for sure inside myclass.h or there's some code, that is not shown here.

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How about #include <string>?

Without it (and the following code)

#include <iostream>

int main(){
   std::string data;
   std::string e;

   std::cout << e << std::endl;

   return 0;
}

my g++ reports :

tst.cpp: In function `int main()':
tst.cpp:4: undeclared variable `string' (first use here)
tst.cpp:4: parse error before `;'
tst.cpp:5: parse error before `;'
tst.cpp:7: `e' undeclared (first use this function)
tst.cpp:7: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
tst.cpp:7: for each function it appears in.)
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you should include <iostream>

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Did you include <iostream> somewhere?

EDIT after knowing that you have added <iostream>

Well you can check:

  • #include <string>
  • If your class definition is finished by semi-colon

If everything is OK I want to check your myclass.h :-(

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The code you post (with the EDIT) is correct. There must be something funny going on in myclass.h. (Maybe a

#define std

, so that the compiler sees ::cout.)

You might want to have a look at the pre-processor output: compiler option -E under Unix, /E for Visual Studios. It will be voluminous, but all you're interested in is the last 10 or so lines; what the pre-processor has done to your code.

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