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Using var outside of a method

I've searched for this a bit, but am not too sure of the search terms so didn't find anything.

Why can't i do this:

class foo
{
    var bar = new Dictionary<string, string>();
}

Guessing there must be a very good reason, but i can't think of it!

I'm more interested in the reasoning, rather than the because "C# doesn't let you" answer.

EDIT: Edited Dictionary declaration, sorry (just a typo in the example)!

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marked as duplicate by Paolo Tedesco, AakashM, Brian Rasmussen, Cody Gray, leppie May 19 '11 at 9:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

2 reasons:

  1. The Dictionary requires Key and Value generic parameters
  2. You cannot write variables like this directly inside a class => you could use fields, properties or methods

So:

class foo
{
    private Dictionary<string, string> bar = new Dictionary<string, string>();
}

As to why you cannot do this:

class foo
{
    private var bar = new Dictionary<string, string>();
}

Eric Lippert has covered it in a blog post.

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You did not specify a type for the key, it should be:

class foo
{
    Dictionary<string,string> bar = new Dictionary<string,string>();
}

Edit: And it's not allowed to use "var" in case of class fields.

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No, this won't compile. –  Darin Dimitrov May 19 '11 at 9:00
    
Fixed, it was because of the "var", which is only allowed in case of member variables. –  BitKFu May 19 '11 at 9:01

A dictionary needs two parameters, a key type and a value type.

var bar = new Dictionary<string, string>();
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"Dictionary" means a collection of key/value pairs. In real-world, a dictionary of worlds is a book containing "Words" and "Definitions", here "Word" is key and "Definition" is value. So this is obvious that you can't ignore "value" when instantiating a Dictionary<TKey, TValue>.

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A dictionary is a class for mapping a set of keys to a set of values, so you need to specify a type parameter for both the key and value. For example, if you want to lookup a share price based on its stock symbol, you might use:

var stocks = new Dictionary<string, decimal>();
stocks.Add("MSFT", 25.5M);
stocks.Add("AAPL", 339.87M);
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