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double radius = 5;
double area = Math.PI * Math.pow(radius, 2);            
// System.out.println(area);

BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal(area).setScale(2, HALF_UP);
// BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal(area).setScale(2, ROUND_HALF_UP);
System.out.println(bd.toString());

The above output gets printed as 78.54, but if I perform the same operation via the calculator (windows calc interface) the output comes out as 78.57 (i.e. 22/7 * 25).

Why is there an inconsistency

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55  
This just in: pi isn't actually 22/7. –  Jon Skeet May 19 '11 at 9:31
    
If I do PI*25 in calc.exe I get 78.539..., i.e. rounded it's 78.54 –  Thomas May 19 '11 at 9:33
3  
When I was in primary school, our teacher taught us that the definition of PI was 22/7. Sadly, I believed this until I was 14 years old. Biggest trauma from my childhood. –  Philippe Leybaert May 19 '11 at 9:59
    
@Philippe Leybaert: Me too! Those were the times :( –  BoltClock May 19 '11 at 10:15
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3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Are you using 22/7 as an approximate value for PI? Because 22/7 is 3.142857142857... where PI is approximately 3.14159.... This explains your rounding inconsistencies.

The approximation of PI that is used in the JVM is documented here. According to the JavaDoc, it is:

The double value that is closer than any other to pi

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1  
so what exactly is PI, should I just assume that Math.PI gives me the right value and not 22/7 –  Joe May 19 '11 at 9:33
2  
Yes. Its value is 3.141592653589793 [truncated] ,You can try 3.141592653589793 * 25 in calc –  Jigar Joshi May 19 '11 at 9:34
2  
@Joe since PI is a constant I assume it's just stored up to some precision setting. There's no need to calculate a constant that can't change (ald calculating it would have a performance hit too, although normally not measurable). –  Thomas May 19 '11 at 9:35
3  
Pi is 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510... see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi –  Jesper May 19 '11 at 9:35
2  
Yes, you can assume that Math.PI is MUCH more closer to the actual PI than 22/7. You can see its exact value in the Java documentation download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/… –  Vivien Barousse May 19 '11 at 9:35
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22/7 is approximation to PI , Its not exact and so the result

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4  
You could use 3 as well; it's not that bad of an approximation and easier to calculate with –  flq May 19 '11 at 9:55
3  
Did you hit submit prematurely? –  BoltClock May 19 '11 at 10:03
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Almost completely off-topic (and its javascript). But its still a fun answer for actually visibly seeing PI being calculated.

This method is obviously super-super-slow at calculating PI...but is kinda fun to watch.

(function (t) {
    (function () {
        var a = 0,
            b = 1,
            d = 4,
            c = ~1e9;
        (function p() {
            if (!t) {
                return;
            }
            b -= 2;
            a -= d / b;
            d = -d;
            if (++c % 2000 === 0) {
                t.innerHTML = a;
                setTimeout(p, 13);
            } else {
                if (c) {
                    p();
                } else {
                    t.innerHTML = a;
                }
            }
        }());
    }());
}(document.getElementById("someplace-to-hold-the-calculation")))

Philippe Leybaert set up a JSBin for it.

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1  
Cool. Here's the live demo of your function: jsbin.com/awupo4 –  Philippe Leybaert May 19 '11 at 14:25
    
+1 and Thanks, I've added it to the answer. –  David Murdoch May 19 '11 at 14:45
    
I actually use this function in loading messages sometimes. Like this: Calculating PI to infinity, please wait...<span id='pi-calc'>3.14</span>. I also use "Reticulating Splines", "It's still faster than you could draw it", and "Please wait. (As if you had any other choice.)". :-D –  David Murdoch May 19 '11 at 14:50
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