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I'm just putting the finishing touches on a project I've been working on to render a scene in OpenGL - I based some of it on some old code I wrote for a Camera class (since I didn't want to have to re-figure out the maths!), however I'd included the Camera class as part of main.cpp before, and I wanted to move it to it's own seperate .h/.cpp files for the sake of reusability/clarity/general good practice.

I also replaced a basic Struct to hold the x and y position of the mouse with a Mouse class that I wrote.

I changed some code in the Windows Message Handler to have the Camera update when the Left Mouse Button is released - however I am getting a strange linking error -

1>main.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "public: void __thiscall Camera::moveCamera(int,int,int,int)" (?moveCamera@Camera@@QAEXHHHH@Z)

The code in the Windows Message Handler is -

    case WM_LBUTTONUP:
        Mouse.SetPos(lParam); 
        x_mouse_end = Mouse.GetXPos();
        y_mouse_end = Mouse.GetYPos(); 
        Camera.moveCamera(x_mouse_start, y_mouse_start, x_mouse_end, y_mouse_end);
        SetCamera(); 
        break;

The parameters I'm passing to Camera.moveCamera() are integers as they are supposed to be.

The moveCamera() function is as follows -

//Moves the camera based on a user dragging the mouse 
inline void Camera::moveCamera(int old_x, int old_y, int new_x, int new_y)
{
    //To store the differences between the old and new mouse positions 
    int x_difference, y_difference; 

    //If the mouse was dragged to the right, move the camera right
    if(new_x > old_x)
    {
        x_difference = new_x - old_x;
        x_difference = x_difference / 25;

        if(yaw > 350)
        {
            yaw = 0;
        }
        else
        {
            yaw = yaw + x_difference;
        }
    }

    //If the mouse was dragged to the left, move the camera left
    if(new_x < old_x)
    {
        x_difference = old_x - new_x;
        x_difference = x_difference / 25;

        if(yaw < 10)
        {
            yaw = 360;
        }
        else
        {
            yaw = yaw - x_difference;
        }
    }

    //If the mouse was dragged down, move the camera down
    if(new_y < old_y)
    {
        y_difference = new_y - old_y;
        y_difference = y_difference / 20;

        if(pitch < 10)
        {
            pitch = 360;
        }
        else
        {
            pitch = pitch - y_difference;
        }
    }

    //If the mouse was dragged up, move the camera up
    if(new_y > old_y)
    {
        y_difference = old_y - new_y;
        y_difference = y_difference / 20;
        if(pitch > 350)
        {
            pitch = 0;
        }
        else
        {
            pitch = pitch + y_difference;
        }
    }

    //Update the camera position based on the new Yaw, Pitch and Roll
    cameraUpdate();

}

"camera.h" is included as it should be, as is "mouse.h", and instances of both classes are set up -

Mouse Mouse;
Camera Camera;

I'm at a loss as to what could be missing.

Please let me know if you would like more information.

share|improve this question
    
Is moveCamera in a different dll or project ? –  Yochai Timmer May 19 '11 at 11:09
    
No it's in the Camera class which is in camera.h - Diego has found the issue however - thanks :) –  ShimmerGeek May 19 '11 at 11:12
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe you included that definition of moveCamera() in a .cpp file with the "inline" keyword. This may be interpreted that this method is local to the .cpp in which it is defined. Try removing the inline.

share|improve this answer
    
Bingo! Thanks! :) –  ShimmerGeek May 19 '11 at 11:09
    
You're welcome :) –  Diego Sevilla May 19 '11 at 11:09
    
I thought inline meant for the compiler to try to do something in one go? (Sorry if that's a naive perception) –  ShimmerGeek May 19 '11 at 11:10
1  
inline is usually used when you want to inline a method definition that you include in the same .h file, but outside the class definition. Otherwise usually means "static", as the compiler will try to inline as much as possible most of the time (with optimizations enabled, that is). –  Diego Sevilla May 19 '11 at 11:12
    
@ShimmerGeek - It is, but it also makes the function local to the file. And lets you have inlined copies in several files. –  Bo Persson May 19 '11 at 11:12
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