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So, I have a class that does string manipulation based on metadata attached to each character in the string. Internally, I represent this with a std::vector<CharacterType> where CharacterType contains, among other things, the character in question. This internal representation is useful to me, but at the end of the manipulation(s) the class user is interested in the string itself.

In order to do this, I decided to extend std::vector<CharacterType>::iterator to include an operator*() method that returns a character rather than a CharacterType. Here's the code, it works in Visual Studio 2008 on Windows 7. But is it idiomatic C++? I haven't written much C++ since the 90s, so I'd appreciate some feedback on the style or if I'm doing something dangerous and/or evil. (In the code below I made a simplified CharacterType structure called mytype -- in reality the structure is quite a bit bigger.)

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

struct mytype {
    char c;
};

class myit : public std::vector<mytype>::iterator {
public:
    inline myit(std::vector<mytype>::iterator const &c)
        : std::vector<mytype>::iterator(c) {}
    char operator*() {
        const mytype &p =
            std::vector<mytype>::iterator::operator*();
        return p.c;
    }

    // Added these in a later edit, after thinking about a comment below
    typedef char value_type;
    typedef char *pointer;
    typedef char &reference;

private:
};

int
main()
{
    mytype test[] = { {'a'}, {'b'}, {'c'}, {'d'} };
    std::vector<mytype> vec(&test[0], &test[4]);
    myit i(vec.begin()), e(vec.end());
    std::string str(i, e);

    std::cout << str << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Assuming this is good style, is it appropriate to use C++ type-aware method overloading to have several operator*() methods in myit so that I can use the same iterator class to get another member of a different type? Or would it be better to use a template? For example, one piece of metadata is the character's language, and I would like to be able to extract a std::vector<LanguageType> in exactly the same way. Thoughts?

Also, since the methods that return these data don't affect the object's internal representation, in the interest of const correctness I would like to be able to define the accessors const. This probably means that I'd need to modify the above to use a const_iterator instead, but I haven't gotten to that yet.

Thanks for your style critiques in advance!

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5 Answers

You are not supposed to derive std::vector (nor other STL containers), because its destructor is not virtual and you can run into situations the vector's destructor is not called and you get memory leaks.

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hey, he is subclassing std::vector::iterator... –  sergio May 19 '11 at 11:51
    
and also there is nothing wrong with destruction here –  Alexandre C. May 19 '11 at 12:02
    
Hm, as Sergio pointed out, I'm actually deriving an iterator. But, more generally, can I derive if I don't declare a destructor, or will that still block the base class's destructor from triggering? What about calling the base class's destructor explicitly? I don't see the need at the moment to derive an STL container, but it's always good to know this stuff. –  808140 May 19 '11 at 12:03
    
right, sorry for the mistake, seems that I didn't pay enough attention. –  Marius Bancila May 19 '11 at 12:06
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first of all, I would also like to be able to write so good C++ after such a long break, if it should ever happen to me!

said that, what are the reasons for ruling out a simple conversion operator from your CharacterType to char? something like: CharacterType::operator char();

of course, we all know the problems with operator overloading (but that would not change in the two cases)...

about other things you ask, you cannot overload based on the return type, so you could not possibly have different operator()s for different return types, if that's what you mean.

but you could use templates for that, as you mention.

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Thanks for your kind words. It honestly didn't occur to me that I could use a conversion operator, I forgot those existed. I'll investigate them. Also, you're right about return type polymorphism, too. I may need to duplicate some boilerplate here. –  808140 May 19 '11 at 12:00
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I don't believe that you can have "several operator*() overloads" in the same class; presumably you would want to disambiguate based on return-type, but C++ does not do this.

Also, directly deriving from an unrelated iterator type may not be a great idea. In order to operate correctly as an STL iterator, an iterator class needs to define a number of typedefs, etc. None of yours will be meaningful if you directly inherit them like this. For more information, see e.g. this article on Custom Containers & Iterators for STL-Friendly Code.

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Yes, you're right of course (about the return type polymorphism), my mistake. Still getting back into the C++ swing of things. I'll take a look at your link, thanks. –  808140 May 19 '11 at 12:03
    
Oli, after thinking about your comment I decided to go ahead and define value_type, pointer, and reference appropriately, which I think should make the class more consistent. What do you think? Thanks again btw. –  808140 May 19 '11 at 13:14
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You're breaking several iterator contracts by returning a type other than CharacterType from operator*(). Honestly- just give CharacterType an operator char() if you're desperate for them to be convertible.

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Do the typedefs I added to my iterator instance change your mind at all, or do they not help? –  808140 May 19 '11 at 13:27
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

A few different people suggested that I look into conversion operators, which I must admit I totally forgot about. A conversion operator based solution is considerably cleaner:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

struct mytype {
    char c;
    inline operator char () { return c; }
};

int
main()
{
    mytype test[] = { {'a'}, {'b'}, {'c'}, {'d'} };
    std::vector<mytype> vec(&test[0], &test[4]);
    std::string str(vec.begin(), vec.end());

    std::cout << str << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

... and it doesn't involve me worrying about ominous sounding things like violating STL iterator contracts. Plus, it seems (although I haven't tried it yet) that if I want to be able to easily copy something other than the string (the std::vector<LanguageType> idea in my original question) I can extend this easily by just adding a different cast operator, whereas the iterator derivation technique would have required much more boilerplate, since there is no return type polymorphism in C++, as several people pointed out to me.

Thanks a lot for your responses, once I get the rep to do it I will upvote you all, in case you're wondering why I haven't yet.

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You could also look into using std::basic_string<mytype> instead of std::vector<mytype>. std::basic_string is a template class for string types (std::string is just a typedef for std::basic_string<char>). This would allow your mystring type more string-like (instead of having to use a std::vector, making it vector-like). You'll need to take a comprehensive look at std::char_traits and specialize that for mytype, but all in all I think that would make your code easier than trying to use std::vector to store what appears to be a string. –  Chris Lutz May 20 '11 at 10:30
    
@ChrisLutz thanks for the tip. Actually though vector is a better model for what I'm trying to do than basic_string; I did look at it briefly. Ultimately the problem of having to "throw out" the metadata is the same, and vector is a tad more convenient for some of the stuff I'm doing. –  808140 May 23 '11 at 14:12
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