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I have a class A with nested class Inner_vector,

class A: 
{
public: 
  class Inner_vector:public Vector
    {
      bool append(const class Element& element);
    };
};
bool A::Inner_vector::append(const class Element& element)
{
   add(element);
}

Now I want to derive a child class from A and also customize the "append" and "delete" methods of the inner class "Inner_vector" (mainly to add one new operation), so that the customized operations will be called instead. How could I do it? should I also derive a new nested class inside Child_A from A::Inner_vector as the following code

class Child_A: public A
{
public: 
  class Inner_Child_vector : public A::Inner_vector
    {
      bool append(const class Element& element);
    };
};
bool Child_A::Inner_Child_vector::append(const class Element& element)
{
   A::Inner_vector::append();
   my_new_operation();
}

Or I do not need to derive from A::Inner_vector and directly rewrite it?

I really appreciate any help and comments.

share|improve this question
    
I hope you're not inheriting from std::vector? Cause that is a BAD idea! –  Tony The Lion May 19 '11 at 11:39
    
How is Inner_vector being used? –  Oliver Charlesworth May 19 '11 at 11:41
    
no, the Vector is some customized base class, which actually uses std::vector. But I cannot change this and probably I could not change class A either. –  pepero May 19 '11 at 11:43
    
How is Inner_vector used? I think it will be mainly called via object A, and append/delete element. –  pepero May 19 '11 at 11:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In C++, inner classes are unrelated to the classes containing them except for scoping. So you have to derive the base's inner class in the derived class.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, Jan, thank you for your answer. Do you mean that it would be like the code example I provide? –  pepero May 19 '11 at 11:52

You could always not create another class for inner_vector and have it a protected member in your outer class 'A', class 'A' can then define two virtual functions append and delete.

Which means when you inherit and create 'Child_A' you just define a new behaviour for append and delete. This will require you to extend your inner vector class to give you enough access to its internals that you can create the append and delete behaviours you want from the classes that contain it.

class A 
{
 public: 
  virtual bool append( const class Element& element )
  {
    //  your specific A behaviour
  }     

 protected:
  // std::vector or your own implementation
  std::vector _innerVector;

};

class Derived : public A
{
 public:
  virtual bool append( const class Element& element )
  {
    // derived implementation
  }
};

If this is not possible then you have to derive both classes as they are unrelated.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you Sergio, unfortunately, A is already there, and I could not change anything with it, e.g., the append method is not virtual. –  pepero May 19 '11 at 11:51
    
This wont work then I am afraid, the classes nested or not are unrelated and need to be implemented separately, this seems like a very good situation where the inner vector functionality should be changed to provide a great more deal of access to its functionality so that you can use the outer class to wrap it nicely. –  Sergio Franco May 19 '11 at 11:54
    
you mean, I have to derive both and also maintaining the scope(inner_derived inside derived), like the code example I provide? –  pepero May 19 '11 at 12:01
    
Yes that is correct –  Sergio Franco May 19 '11 at 12:02

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