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I am making some benchmarks with CUDA, C++, C#, and Java, and using MATLAB for verification and matrix generation. But when I multiply with MATLAB, 2048x2048 and even bigger matrices are almost instantly multiplied.

             1024x1024   2048x2048   4096x4096
             ---------   ---------   ---------
CUDA C (ms)      43.11      391.05     3407.99
C++ (ms)       6137.10    64369.29   551390.93
C# (ms)       10509.00   300684.00  2527250.00
Java (ms)      9149.90    92562.28   838357.94
MATLAB (ms)      75.01      423.10     3133.90

Only CUDA is competitive, but I thought that at least C++ will be somewhat close and not 60x slower.

So my question is - How is MATLAB doing it that fast?

C++ Code:

float temp = 0;
timer.start();
for(int j = 0; j < rozmer; j++)
{
    for (int k = 0; k < rozmer; k++)
    {
        temp = 0;
        for (int m = 0; m < rozmer; m++)
        {
            temp = temp + matice1[j][m] * matice2[m][k];
        }
        matice3[j][k] = temp;
    }
}
timer.stop();

Edit: I also dont know what to think about the C# results. The algorithm is just the same as C++ and Java, but there's a giant jump 2048 from 1024?

Edit2: Updated MATLAB and 4096x4096 results

share|improve this question
11  
Probably its a question of which algorithm you use. – Robert J. May 19 '11 at 11:49
17  
Make sure Matlab isn't caching you result, it's a tricky beast. First ensure the calculation is actually being performed, and then compare. – rubenvb May 19 '11 at 11:49
18  
LAPACK and vectorisation. mathworks.com/company/newsletters/news_notes/clevescorner/… – James May 19 '11 at 11:52
    
Algorithm classic matrix multiplication through 3 for loops, matlab results looks fine, not exact (but very close) when using floats but I think thats because number rounding in languages. – Wolf May 19 '11 at 11:56
6  
I actually do think that this post is really interesting but I would really like to see more appropriate benchmarks. For example, I think that Matlab R2011a is using multithreading automatically and matrix multiplications are implemented using Intel's mkl/blas library. Thus, I would guess that c++ is faster if one used an mkl call to do the matrix multiplication. The question would then be what Matlab's overhead is. I know that this depends on additional details of the matrix multiplication but the above numbers are pretty meaningless right now. – Lucas Jul 14 '11 at 7:03

16 Answers 16

up vote 53 down vote accepted

Here's my results using MATLAB R2011a + Parallel Computing Toolbox on a machine with a Tesla C2070:

>> A = rand(1024); gA = gpuArray(A);
% warm up by executing the operations a couple of times, and then:
>> tic, C = A * A; toc
Elapsed time is 0.075396 seconds.
>> tic, gC = gA * gA; toc
Elapsed time is 0.008621 seconds.

MATLAB uses highly optimized libraries for matrix multiplication which is why the plain MATLAB matrix multiplication is so fast. The gpuArray version uses MAGMA.

Update using R2014a on a machine with a Tesla K20c, and the new timeit and gputimeit functions:

>> A = rand(1024); gA = gpuArray(A);
>> timeit(@()A*A)
ans =
    0.0324
>> gputimeit(@()gA*gA)
ans =
    0.0022
share|improve this answer

This kind of question is recurring and should be answered more clearly than "Matlab uses highly optimized libraries" or "Matlab uses the MKL" for once on Stackoverflow.

History:

Matrix multiplication (together with Matrix-vector, vector-vector multiplication and many of the matrix decompositions) is (are) the most important problems in linear algrebra. Engineers have been solving these problems with computers since the early days.

I'm not an expert on the history, but apparently back then, everybody just rewrote his Fortran version with simple loops. Some standardization then came along, with the identification of "kernels" (basic routines) that most linear algebra problems needed in order to be solved. These basic operations were then standardized in a specification called: Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS). Engineers could then call these standard, well-tested BLAS routines in their code, making their work much easier.

BLAS:

BLAS evolved from level 1 (the first version which defined scalar-vector and vector-vector operations) to level 2 (vector-matrix operations) to level 3 (matrix-matrix operations), and provided more and more "kernels" so standardized more and more of the fundamental linear algebra operations. The original Fortran 77 implementations are still available on Netlib's website.

Towards better performance:

So over the years (notably between the BLAS level 1 and level 2 releases: early 80s), hardware changed, with the advent of vector operations and cache hierarchies. These evolutions made it possible to increase the performance of the BLAS subroutines substantially. Different vendors then came along with their implementation of BLAS routines which were more and more efficient.

I don't know all the historical implementations (I was not born or a kid back then), but two of the most notable ones came out in the early 2000s: the Intel MKL and GotoBLAS. Your Matlab uses the Intel MKL, which is a very good, optimized BLAS, and that explains the great performance you see.

Technical details on Matrix multiplication:

So why is Matlab (the MKL) so fast at dgemm (double-precision general matrix-matrix multiplication)? In simple terms: because it uses vectorization and good caching of data. In more complex terms: see the article provided by Jonathan Moore.

Basically, when you perform your multiplication in the C++ code you provided, you are not at all cache-friendly. Since I suspect you created an array of pointers to row arrays, your accesses in your inner loop to the k-th column of "matice2": matice2[m][k] are very slow. Indeed, when you access matice2[0][k], you must get the k-th element of the array 0 of your matrix. Then in the next iteration, you must access matice2[1][k], which is the k-th element of another array (the array 1). Then in the next iteration you access yet another array, and so on... Since the entire matrix matice2 can't fit in the highest caches (it's 8*1024*1024 bytes large), the program must fetch the desired element from main memory, losing a lot of time.

If you just transposed the matrix, so that accesses would be in contiguous memory addresses, your code would already run much faster because now the compiler can load entire rows in the cache at the same time. Just try this modified version:

timer.start();
float temp = 0;
//transpose matice2
for (int p = 0; p < rozmer; p++)
{
    for (int q = 0; q < rozmer; q++)
    {
        tempmat[p][q] = matice2[q][p];
    }
}
for(int j = 0; j < rozmer; j++)
{
    for (int k = 0; k < rozmer; k++)
    {
        temp = 0;
        for (int m = 0; m < rozmer; m++)
        {
            temp = temp + matice1[j][m] * tempmat[k][m];
        }
        matice3[j][k] = temp;
    }
}
timer.stop();

So you can see how just cache locality increased your code's performance quite substantially. Now real dgemm implementations exploit that to a very extensive level: They perform the multiplication on blocks of the matrix defined by the size of the TLB (Translation lookaside buffer, long story short: what can effectively be cached), so that they stream to the processor exactly the amount of data it can process. The other aspect is vectorization, they use the processor's vectorized instructions for optimal instruction throughput, which you can't really do from your cross-platform C++ code.

Finally, people claiming that it's because of Strassen's or Coppersmith–Winograd algorithm are wrong, both these algorithms are not implementable in practice, because of hardware considerations mentioned above.

share|improve this answer
4  
By far the best and most extensive answer in here. I learned a lot! – Adriaan Nov 5 '15 at 22:35
1  
Thank you @reverse_engineer – zackery.fix Jan 2 at 19:15
2  
Beautiful answer. Honestly this should be the one that is accepted. It provides an answer in both a historical context as well as some nice (psuedo)code to boot. Thank you. +1. – rayryeng Feb 19 at 20:27
1  
This should be the accepted answer. – kmiklas Mar 22 at 0:40

This is why. MATLAB doesn't perform a naive matrix multiplication by looping over every single element the way you did in your C++ code.

Of course I'm assuming that you just used C=A*B instead of writing a multiplication function yourself.

share|improve this answer

Matlab incorporated LAPACK some time ago, so I assume their matrix multiplication uses something at least that fast. LAPACK source code and documentation is readily available.

You might also look at Goto and Van De Geijn's paper "Anatomy of High-Performance Matrix Multiplication" at http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.140.1785&rep=rep1&type=pdf

share|improve this answer
6  
MATLAB uses Intel MKL Library which provides optimized implementation of BLAS/LAPACK routines: stackoverflow.com/a/16723946/97160 – Amro Jun 17 '13 at 17:22

When doing matrix multiplying, you use naive multiplication method which takes time of O(n^3).

There exist matrix multiplication algorithm which takes O(n^2.4). Which means that at n=2000 your algorithm requires ~100 times as much computation as the best algorithm.
You should really check the wikipedia page for matrix multiplication for further information on the efficient ways to implement it.

share|improve this answer
    
and MATLAB probably use such an algorithm since the time for 1024*1024 matrix multiply is smaller than 8 times the time for 2048*2048 matrix multiplication ! Well done MATLAB guys. – Renaud Oct 16 '13 at 15:11
2  
I rather doubt they use the "efficient" multiplication algorithms, despite their theoretical advantages. Even Strassen's algorithm has implementation difficulties, and the Coppersmith–Winograd algorithm that you have probably read about just plain isn't practical (right now). Also, related SO thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/17716565/… – Ernir Jan 29 '14 at 9:06

You need to be careful about making fair comparisons with C++. Can you post the C++ code that shows the core inner loops that you're using for matrix multiplication? Mostly, I'm concerned with your memory layout and whether you're doing things wastefully.

I've written C++ matrix multiplication that is as fast as Matlab's but it took some care. (EDIT: Before Matlab was using GPUs for this.)

You can be virtually guaranteed that Matlab is wasting very few cycles on these "built-in" functions. My question is, where are you wasting cycles? (No offense)

share|improve this answer
1  
Code added... its simple, so I didnt expected great results, but not that bad either. :) – Wolf May 19 '11 at 16:04
3  
You will get a big improvement by using pointer increments instead of random memory accesses. If I get time later, I will post some code. – Chris A. May 19 '11 at 17:01
2  
@Chris A. : Could you post some code? I'd really like to see. – user807566 Aug 31 '11 at 5:19
    
@ChrisA. : Just revisited this post, I am curious about your code as well. Could you try to do it? :) – M. Mimpen Jan 31 '14 at 13:50

Depending on your version of Matlab, I believe it might be using your GPU already.

Another thing; Matlab keeps track of many properties of your matrix; wether its diagonal, hermetian, and so forth, and specializes its algorithms based thereon. Maybe its specializing based on the zero matrix you are passing it, or something like that? Maybe it is caching repeated function calls, which messes up your timings? Perhaps it optimizes out repeated unused matrix products?

To guard against such things happening, use a matrix of random numbers, and make sure you force execution by printing the result to screen or disk or somesuch.

share|improve this answer
4  
As a heavy ML user, I can tell you they aren't using GPGPU yet. New version of matlab DO use SSE1/2 (finally). But I have done tests. A MexFunction performing an element-wise multiplication runs twice as fast as A.*B does. So the OP is almost certainly goofing on something. – KitsuneYMG May 19 '11 at 12:00
5  
Matlab with Parallel Computing Toolbox can use a CUDA GPU, but it's explicit - you have to push the data to the GPU. – Edric May 19 '11 at 12:38
    
I use M1 = single(rand(1024,1024)*255); M2 = single(rand(1024,1024)*255); and M3 = M1 * M2; ... then write to binary file of floats, its all done very quickly. – Wolf May 19 '11 at 13:45

The answer is LAPACK and BLAS libraries make MATLAB blindingly fast at matrix operations, not any proprietary code by the folks at MATLAB.

Use the LAPACK and/or BLAS libraries in your C++ code for matrix operations and you should get similar performance as MATLAB. These libraries should be freely available on any modern system and parts were developed over decades in academia. Note that there are multiple implementations, including some closed source such as Intel MKL.

Why is BLAS/LAPACK so fast? (i) efficient algorithms and (ii) fine tuning that exploits CPU architecture. Eg. it turns out matrix multiplication can be done with an O(n^2.807) instead of O(n^3) algorithm, and this is incorporated into several BLAS implementations. Clever grouping of operations minimize the need to move numbers on or off CPU registers etc...


BTW, it's a serious pain in my experience to call LAPACK libraries directly from c (but worth it). You need to read the documentation VERY precisely.

share|improve this answer

Using doubles and one solid array instead of three separate leads my C# code to almost the same results as C++/Java (with your code: 1024 - was a little bit faster, 2048 - was about 140s and 4096 - was about 22 mins)

                1024x1024   2048x2048   4096x4096
                ---------   ---------   ---------
your C++ (ms)   6137.10     64369.29     551390.93
my C# (ms)      9730.00     90875.00    1062156.00

here is my code:

    const int rozmer = 1024;
    double[][] matice1 = new double[rozmer * 3][];
    Random rnd = new Random();

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        System.Threading.Thread thr = new System.Threading.Thread(new System.Threading.ThreadStart(() =>
        {

            string res = "";
            Stopwatch timer = new Stopwatch();
            timer.Start();

            double temp = 0;
            int r2 = rozmer * 2;

            for (int i = 0; i < rozmer*3; i++)
            {
                if (matice1[i] == null)
                {
                    matice1[i] = new double[rozmer];
                    {
                        for (int e = 0; e < rozmer; e++)
                        {
                            matice1[i][e] = rnd.NextDouble();
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            timer.Stop();
            res += timer.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString();

            int j = 0; int k = 0; int m = 0;

            timer.Reset();
            timer.Start();
            for (j = 0; j < rozmer; j++)
            {
                for (k = 0; k < rozmer; k++)
                {
                    temp = 0;
                    for (m = 0; m < rozmer; m++)
                    {
                        temp = temp + matice1[j][m] * matice1[m + rozmer][k];
                    }
                    matice1[j + r2][k] = temp;
                }
            }
            timer.Stop();
            this.Invoke((Action)delegate
            {
                this.Text = res + " : " + timer.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString();
            });
        }));
        thr.Start();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
What CPU/GPU chipsets, compilers, and versions were used to get these metrics? – zackery.fix Jan 2 at 22:51
    
as you can see the code does not use any GPU. It was tested on Pentium 4 Dual Core – okarpov Jan 3 at 15:22
    
That isn't very specific, which chipset? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Pentium_4_microprocessors – zackery.fix Jan 4 at 1:12
1  
Pentium Dual-Core CPU E5800 @ 3.20GHz (GenuineIntel_-_x86_Family_6_Model_23) ark.intel.com/products/42802/… – okarpov Jan 4 at 14:58

Did you check that all the implementations used multi-threading optimizations for the algorithm ? And did they use the same multiplication algorithm ?

I really doubt that.

Matlab isn't inherently fast, you probably used slow implementations.

Algorithms for efficient matrix multiplication

share|improve this answer

The general answer to "Why is matlab faster at doing xxx than other programs" is that matlab has a lot of built in, optimized functions.

The other programs that are used often do not have these functions so people apply their own creative solutions, which are suprisingly slower than professionally optimized code.

This can be interpreted in two ways:

1) The common/theoretical way: Matlab is not significantly faster, you are just doing the benchmark wrong

2) The realistic way: For this stuff Matlab is faster in practice because languages as c++ are just too easily used in ineffective ways.

share|improve this answer
3  
He's comparing MATLAB speed with the speed of a function he wrote in two minutes. I can write a faster function in 10 minutes, or a much faster function in two hours. The MATLAB guys have spent more than two hours on making their matrix multiplication fast. – gnasher729 Apr 4 '14 at 17:13

The sharp contrast is not only due to Matlab's amazing optimization (as discussed by many other answers already), but also in the way you formulated matrix as an object.

It seems like you made matrix a list of lists? A list of lists contains pointers to lists which then contain your matrix elements. The locations of the contained lists are assigned arbitrarily. As you are looping over your first index (row number?), the time of memory access is very significant. In comparison, why don't you try implement matrix as a single list/vector using the following method?

#include <vector>

struct matrix {
    matrix(int x, int y) : n_row(x), n_col(y), M(x * y) {}
    int n_row;
    int n_col;
    std::vector<double> M;
    double &operator()(int i, int j);
};

And

double &matrix::operator()(int i, int j) {
    return M[n_col * i + j];
}

The same multiplication algorithm should be used so that the number of flop is the same. (n^3 for square matrices of size n)

I'm asking you to time it so that the result is comparable to what you had earlier (on the same machine). With the comparison, you will show exactly how significant memory access time can be!

share|improve this answer

MATLAB uses a highly optimized implementation of LAPACK from Intel known as Intel Math Kernel Library (Intel MKL) - specifically the dgemm function. The speed This library takes advantage of processor features including SIMD instructions and multi-core processors. They don't document which specific algorithm they use. If you were to call Intel MKL from C++ you should see similar performance.

I am not sure what library MATLAB uses for GPU multiplication but probably something like nVidia CUBLAS.

share|improve this answer
1  
You are right, but have you seen this answer? However, IPP is not MKL and MKL has far superior linear algebra performance compared to IPP. Also, IPP deprecated their matrix math module in recent versions. – chappjc Sep 10 '15 at 6:32
    
Sorry I meant MKL not IPP – gregswiss Sep 10 '15 at 6:38
    
You are right the other answer covers it. It's so verbose I missed it. – gregswiss Sep 11 '15 at 5:59

It's slow in C++ because you are not using multithreading. Essentially, if A = B C, where they are all matrices, the first row of A can be computed independently from the 2nd row, etc. If A, B, and C are all n by n matrices, you can speed up the multiplication by a factor of n^2, as

a_{i,j} = sum_{k} b_{i,k} c_{k,j}

If you use, say, Eigen [ http://eigen.tuxfamily.org/dox/GettingStarted.html ], multithreading is built-in and the number of threads is adjustable.

share|improve this answer

The answer has to do with how FORTRAN can be so fast. I am pretty sure a lot of the basis of MATLAB lies in fortran code. Now what exactly with the fortran compiler is it that it makes such operations fast (and support commands likes DOT_PRODUCT() and MATMUL()) which is faster than component by component manipulations, or maybe even parrallel GPU proecessing.

share|improve this answer

The upcoming Many-core Engine for Perl (MCE) release 1.4 will help parallelize PDL using child processes or threads.

I'm very happy with the results. I'm able to perform a 2048x2048 matrix multiplication in under 3 seconds inside a CentOS 6.3 virtual machine configured to use all cores on my MacBook Pro at 2.0 GHz.

http://code.google.com/p/many-core-engine-perl/

Release 1.4 will be posted very soon ETA 2 ~ 3 weeks.

Mario

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use FindBin;
use lib "$FindBin::Bin/lib";

use Time::HiRes qw(time);
use Storable qw(freeze thaw);

use PDL;
use PDL::IO::Storable;

use MCE;

my $tam  = 2048;
my $cols = $tam;
my $rows = $tam;

my $a = sequence $tam,$tam;
my $b = sequence $tam,$tam;
my $r = zeroes   $tam,$tam;

my $max_parallel_level = 1;
my @p = ( );

my $start = time();

strassen($a, $b, $r, $tam);

my $end = time();

## print $r;

printf STDERR "\n## Compute time: %0.03f (secs)\n\n",  $end - $start;

##

sub strassen {

   my $a = $_[0]; my $b = $_[1]; my $c = $_[2]; my $tam = $_[3];
   my $level = $_[4] || 0;

   ## Perform the classic multiplication when matrix is <= 128 X 128

   if ($tam <= 128) {

    # for my $i (0 .. $tam - 1) {
    #    for my $j (0 .. $tam - 1) {
    #       $c->[$i][$j] = 0;
    #       for my $k (0 .. $tam - 1) {
    #          $c->[$i][$j] += $a->[$i][$k] * $b->[$k][$j];
    #       }
    #    }
    # }

      $c += $a x $b;

      return;
   }

   ## Otherwise, perform multiplication using Strassen's algorithm

   my $nTam = $tam / 2;

   my $a11 = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;  my $a12 = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;
   my $a21 = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;  my $a22 = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;

   my $b11 = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;  my $b12 = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;
   my $b21 = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;  my $b22 = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;

   my $p1  = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;  my $p2  = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;
   my $p3  = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;  my $p4  = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;
   my $p5  = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;  my $p6  = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;
   my $p7  = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;

   my $t1  = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;  my $t2  = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;

   if (++$level <= $max_parallel_level) {

      ## Parallelize via MCE

      sub store_result {
         my ($n, $result) = @_;
         $p[$n] = $result;
      }

      my $mce = MCE->new(
         max_workers => 7,
         user_tasks => [{
            user_func => sub {
               my $self = $_[0];
               my $data = $self->{user_data};
               my $result = zeroes $nTam,$nTam;
               strassen($data->[0], $data->[1], $result, $data->[3], $level);
               $self->do('store_result', $data->[2], $result);
            },
            task_end => sub {
               $p1 = $p[1]; $p2 = $p[2]; $p3 = $p[3]; $p4 = $p[4];
               $p5 = $p[5]; $p6 = $p[6]; $p7 = $p[7];
               @p  = ( );
            }
         }]
      );

      $mce->spawn();

      ## Divide the matrices into 4 sub-matrices

      divide($a11, $a12, $a21, $a22, $a, $nTam);
      divide($b11, $b12, $b21, $b22, $b, $nTam);

      ## Calculate p1 to p7

      sum_m($a11, $a22, $t1, $nTam);
      sum_m($b11, $b22, $t2, $nTam);
      $mce->send([ $t1, $t2, 1, $nTam ]);

      sum_m($a21, $a22, $t1, $nTam);
      $mce->send([ $t1, $b11, 2, $nTam ]);

      subtract_m($b12, $b22, $t2, $nTam);
      $mce->send([ $a11, $t2, 3, $nTam ]);

      subtract_m($b21, $b11, $t2, $nTam);
      $mce->send([ $a22, $t2, 4, $nTam ]);

      sum_m($a11, $a12, $t1, $nTam);
      $mce->send([ $t1, $b22, 5, $nTam ]);

      subtract_m($a21, $a11, $t1, $nTam);
      sum_m($b11, $b12, $t2, $nTam);
      $mce->send([ $t1, $t2, 6, $nTam ]);

      subtract_m($a12, $a22, $t1, $nTam);
      sum_m($b21, $b22, $t2, $nTam);
      $mce->send([ $t1, $t2, 7, $nTam ]);

      $mce->run();
   }
   else {
      ## Divide the matrices into 4 sub-matrices

      divide($a11, $a12, $a21, $a22, $a, $nTam);
      divide($b11, $b12, $b21, $b22, $b, $nTam);

      ## Calculate p1 to p7

      sum_m($a11, $a22, $t1, $nTam);
      sum_m($b11, $b22, $t2, $nTam);
      strassen($t1, $t2, $p1, $nTam, $level);

      sum_m($a21, $a22, $t1, $nTam);
      strassen($t1, $b11, $p2, $nTam, $level);

      subtract_m($b12, $b22, $t2, $nTam);
      strassen($a11, $t2, $p3, $nTam, $level);

      subtract_m($b21, $b11, $t2, $nTam);
      strassen($a22, $t2, $p4, $nTam, $level);

      sum_m($a11, $a12, $t1, $nTam);
      strassen($t1, $b22, $p5, $nTam, $level);

      subtract_m($a21, $a11, $t1, $nTam);
      sum_m($b11, $b12, $t2, $nTam);
      strassen($t1, $t2, $p6, $nTam, $level);

      subtract_m($a12, $a22, $t1, $nTam);
      sum_m($b21, $b22, $t2, $nTam);
      strassen($t1, $t2, $p7, $nTam, $level);
   }

   ## Calculate and group into a single matrix $c

   calc($p1, $p2, $p3, $p4, $p5, $p6, $p7, $c, $nTam);

   return;
}

sub divide {

   my $m11 = $_[0]; my $m12 = $_[1]; my $m21 = $_[2]; my $m22 = $_[3];
   my $m   = $_[4]; my $tam = $_[5];

 # for my $i (0 .. $tam - 1) {
 #    for my $j (0 .. $tam - 1) {
 #       $m11->[$i][$j] = $m->[$i][$j];
 #       $m12->[$i][$j] = $m->[$i][$j + $tam];
 #       $m21->[$i][$j] = $m->[$i + $tam][$j];
 #       $m22->[$i][$j] = $m->[$i + $tam][$j + $tam];
 #    }
 # }

   my $n1 = $tam - 1;
   my $n2 = $tam + $n1;

   ins(inplace($m11), $m->slice("0:$n1,0:$n1"));
   ins(inplace($m12), $m->slice("$tam:$n2,0:$n1"));
   ins(inplace($m21), $m->slice("0:$n1,$tam:$n2"));
   ins(inplace($m22), $m->slice("$tam:$n2,$tam:$n2"));

   return;
}

sub calc {

   my $p1  = $_[0]; my $p2  = $_[1]; my $p3  = $_[2]; my $p4  = $_[3];
   my $p5  = $_[4]; my $p6  = $_[5]; my $p7  = $_[6]; my $c   = $_[7];
   my $tam = $_[8];

   my $c11 = zeroes $tam,$tam;  my $c12 = zeroes $tam,$tam;
   my $c21 = zeroes $tam,$tam;  my $c22 = zeroes $tam,$tam;
   my $t1  = zeroes $tam,$tam;  my $t2  = zeroes $tam,$tam;

   sum_m($p1, $p4, $t1, $tam);
   sum_m($t1, $p7, $t2, $tam);
   subtract_m($t2, $p5, $c11, $tam);

   sum_m($p3, $p5, $c12, $tam);
   sum_m($p2, $p4, $c21, $tam);

   sum_m($p1, $p3, $t1, $tam);
   sum_m($t1, $p6, $t2, $tam);
   subtract_m($t2, $p2, $c22, $tam);

 # for my $i (0 .. $tam - 1) {
 #    for my $j (0 .. $tam - 1) {
 #       $c->[$i][$j] = $c11->[$i][$j];
 #       $c->[$i][$j + $tam] = $c12->[$i][$j];
 #       $c->[$i + $tam][$j] = $c21->[$i][$j];
 #       $c->[$i + $tam][$j + $tam] = $c22->[$i][$j];
 #    }
 # }

   ins(inplace($c), $c11, 0, 0);
   ins(inplace($c), $c12, $tam, 0);
   ins(inplace($c), $c21, 0, $tam);
   ins(inplace($c), $c22, $tam, $tam);

   return;
}

sub sum_m {

   my $a = $_[0]; my $b = $_[1]; my $r = $_[2]; my $tam = $_[3];

 # for my $i (0 .. $tam - 1) {
 #    for my $j (0 .. $tam - 1) {
 #       $r->[$i][$j] = $a->[$i][$j] + $b->[$i][$j];
 #    }
 # }

   ins(inplace($r), $a + $b);

   return;
}

sub subtract_m {

   my $a = $_[0]; my $b = $_[1]; my $r = $_[2]; my $tam = $_[3];

 # for my $i (0 .. $tam - 1) {
 #    for my $j (0 .. $tam - 1) {
 #       $r->[$i][$j] = $a->[$i][$j] - $b->[$i][$j];
 #    }
 # }

   ins(inplace($r), $a - $b);

   return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The results are included here metacpan.org/source/MARIOROY/MCE-1.504/examples/matmult/README – user1810910 Oct 30 '13 at 11:18
    
What does this have to do with MATLAB? – rayryeng Feb 19 at 20:23

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