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I have several files of data that look like this:

X code year month day pp  
1 4515 1953     6   1  0  
2 4515 1953     6   2  0  
3 4515 1953     6   3  0  
4 4515 1953     6   4  0  
5 4515 1953     6   5  3.5

Sometimes there is data missing, but I don't have NAs, the rows simply don't exist. I need to create NAs when the data is missing. I though I could start by identifying when that occurs by converting it to a zoo object and check for strict regularity (I never used zoo before), I used the following code:

z.date<-paste(CET$year, CET$month, CET$day, sep="/")
z <- read.zoo(CET,  order.by= z.date )
reg<-is.regular(z, strict = TRUE)

But the answer is always true!

Can anyone tell me why is not working? Or even better, tell me a way to create NAs when the data is missing (with or without zoo package)?

thanks

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Do you mean that your data contains no row for some dates? And how does that relate to your first two columns (X and code)? –  Nick Sabbe May 19 '11 at 12:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The seq function to generate sequences has some interesting features that you can use to easily generate a complete sequence of dates. For example, the following code can be used to generate a sequence of dates starting on April 25:

Edit: This feature is documented in ?seq.Date

start = as.Date("2011/04/25")
full <- seq(start, by='1 day', length=15)
full

 [1] "2011-04-25" "2011-04-26" "2011-04-27" "2011-04-28" "2011-04-29"
 [6] "2011-04-30" "2011-05-01" "2011-05-02" "2011-05-03" "2011-05-04"
[11] "2011-05-05" "2011-05-06" "2011-05-07" "2011-05-08" "2011-05-09"

Now use the same principle to generate some data with "missing" rows, by generating the sequence for every 2nd day:

partial <- data.frame(
    date=seq(start, by='2 day', length=6),
    value=1:6
)
partial

        date value
1 2011-04-25     1
2 2011-04-27     2
3 2011-04-29     3
4 2011-05-01     4
5 2011-05-03     5
6 2011-05-05     6

To answer your qeustion, one can use vector subscripting or the match function to create a dataset with NAs:

with(partial, value[match(full, date)])
 [1]  1 NA  2 NA  3 NA  4 NA  5 NA  6 NA NA NA NA

To combine this result with the original full data:

data.frame(Date=full, value=with(partial, value[match(full, date)]))
         Date value
1  2011-04-25     1
2  2011-04-26    NA
3  2011-04-27     2
4  2011-04-28    NA
5  2011-04-29     3
6  2011-04-30    NA
7  2011-05-01     4
8  2011-05-02    NA
9  2011-05-03     5
10 2011-05-04    NA
11 2011-05-05     6
12 2011-05-06    NA
13 2011-05-07    NA
14 2011-05-08    NA
15 2011-05-09    NA
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2  
+1 for cool undocumented trick. Then again: it is documented: ?seq.Date (-: –  Nick Sabbe May 19 '11 at 13:12
    
@Nick Thank you for showing me where to find the docs. I discovered this feature five minutes ago in the R mailing lists using my favourite search engine, but couldn't find any reference to this in ?seq. –  Andrie May 19 '11 at 13:16
    
+1 Great solution. Saved me a lot of time –  ZnArK May 23 '13 at 17:11

In the zoo package "regular" means that the series is equally spaced except possibly for some missing entries. The zooreg class in the zoo package is specifically for that type of series. Note that the set of all regular series includes the set of all equally spaced series but is strictly larger.

The is.regular function checks whether a given series is regular. That is, is the series amenable to making it equally spaced if one inserted NAs for the missing entries?

Regarding your last question, its a FAQ. See FAQ #13 in the zoo FAQ available from the zoo CRAN page or from within R via:

vignette("zoo-faq") 

Also in FAQ #13 there is some illustrative code.

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The first thing to note is that z.date is character, not Date.

Here's how I would solve your problem using xts (a subclass of zoo).

# remove the third obs from sample data
CET <- CET[-3,]
# create an actual Date column in CET
CET$date <- as.Date(with(CET, paste(year, month, day, sep="-")))
# create an xts object using 'date' column
x <- xts(CET[,c("code","pp")], CET$date)
# now merge 'x' with a regular date sequence spanning the start/end of 'x'
X <- merge(x, timeBasedSeq(paste(start(x), end(x), sep="::")))
X
#            code  pp
# 1953-06-01 4515 0.0
# 1953-06-02 4515 0.0
# 1953-06-03   NA  NA
# 1953-06-04 4515 0.0
# 1953-06-05 4515 3.5
share|improve this answer
    
the timeBasedSeq functions repeats some of the days it creates! Which than causes problems with zoo because the "index entries in ‘order.by’ are not unique". for example timeBasedSeq("19860601/19861231") will create ..."1986-10-25" "1986-10-26" "1986-10-26" "1986-10-27"... how can I avoid that? –  sbg May 20 '11 at 15:07

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