Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been studying how to use anti-alias in OpenGL. Here is a tutorial I found.

The Example 6-5 is a small program that is supposed to demonstrate the anti-alias for polygons.

#include <GL/gl.h>
#include <GL/glu.h>
#include <GL/glut.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

GLboolean polySmooth = GL_TRUE;
static void init(void)
{
    glCullFace(GL_BACK);
    glEnable(GL_CULL_FACE);
    glBlendFunc(GL_SRC_ALPHA_SATURATE, GL_ONE);
    glClearColor(0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0);
}

#define NFACE 6
#define NVERT 8
void drawCube(GLdouble x0, GLdouble x1, GLdouble y0,
              GLdouble y1, GLdouble z0, GLdouble z1)
{
    static GLfloat v[8][3];
    static GLfloat c[8][4] = {
        {0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0}, {1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0},
        {0.0, 1.0, 0.0, 1.0}, {1.0, 1.0, 0.0, 1.0},
        {0.0, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0}, {1.0, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0},
        {0.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0}, {1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0}
    };

/*  indices of front, top, left, bottom, right, back faces  */
    static GLubyte indices[NFACE][4] = {
        {4, 5, 6, 7}, {2, 3, 7, 6}, {0, 4, 7, 3},
        {0, 1, 5, 4}, {1, 5, 6, 2}, {0, 3, 2, 1}
    };

    v[0][0] = v[3][0] = v[4][0] = v[7][0] = x0;
    v[1][0] = v[2][0] = v[5][0] = v[6][0] = x1;
    v[0][1] = v[1][1] = v[4][1] = v[5][1] = y0;
    v[2][1] = v[3][1] = v[6][1] = v[7][1] = y1;
    v[0][2] = v[1][2] = v[2][2] = v[3][2] = z0;
    v[4][2] = v[5][2] = v[6][2] = v[7][2] = z1;

#ifdef GL_VERSION_1_1
    glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
    glEnableClientState(GL_COLOR_ARRAY);
    glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, 0, v);
    glColorPointer(4, GL_FLOAT, 0, c);
    glDrawElements(GL_QUADS, NFACE * 4, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, indices);
    glDisableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
    glDisableClientState(GL_COLOR_ARRAY);
#else
    printf("If this is GL Version 1.0, ");
    printf("vertex arrays are not supported.\n");
    exit(1);
#endif
}

/*  Note:  polygons must be drawn from front to back
 *  for proper blending.
 */
void display(void)
{
    if (polySmooth)
    {
        glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);
        glEnable(GL_BLEND);
        glEnable(GL_POLYGON_SMOOTH);
        glDisable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);
    }
    else
    {
        glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);
        glDisable(GL_BLEND);
        glDisable(GL_POLYGON_SMOOTH);
        glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);
    }

    glPushMatrix();
    glTranslatef(0.0, 0.0, -8.0);
    glRotatef(30.0, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0);
    glRotatef(60.0, 0.0, 1.0, 0.0);
    drawCube(-0.5, 0.5, -0.5, 0.5, -0.5, 0.5);
    glPopMatrix();

    glFlush();
}

void reshape(int w, int h)
{
    glViewport(0, 0, (GLsizei) w, (GLsizei) h);
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity();
    gluPerspective(30.0, (GLfloat) w / (GLfloat) h, 1.0, 20.0);
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    glLoadIdentity();
}

void keyboard(unsigned char key, int x, int y)
{
    switch (key)
    {
    case 't':
    case 'T':
        polySmooth = !polySmooth;
        glutPostRedisplay();
        break;
    case 27:
        exit(0);        /*  Escape key  */
        break;
    default:
        break;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    glutInit(&argc, argv);
    glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_SINGLE | GLUT_RGB | GLUT_ALPHA | GLUT_DEPTH);
    glutInitWindowSize(200, 200);
    glutCreateWindow(argv[0]);
    init();
    glutReshapeFunc(reshape);
    glutKeyboardFunc(keyboard);
    glutDisplayFunc(display);
    glutMainLoop();
    return 0;
}

I copied the code to my computer (Ubuntu 11), compiled it and get this:

enter image description here

Reading the code, I think when press the t button, the polygons are supposed to be anti-aliased. And this picture is taken after I pressed the t button. As far as I can see, I don't think these are anti-aliased polygons, is there something wrong in what I did?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

POLYGON_SMOOTH is useless (don't trusk the red book ^^ ). Most graphic cards don't implement that.

Simply add "| GLUT_MULTISAMPLE" in glutInitDisplayMode(). This will add full-screen (well, full-window) antialiasing with the MSAA technique ( Multi Sampled AA ). If it doesn't work, try with freeglut. You can find opengl samples here : OpenGL Samples Pack , they use freeglut.

share|improve this answer
    
It works. I am using freegult. –  trVoldemort May 19 '11 at 14:42
    
this helped me too. thanks. –  iKlsR Jul 7 '12 at 17:53
    
I have searched for this problem the whole moring until I see your answer--just try freeglut.thanks man! –  Sisyphus Jul 27 at 7:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.