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I am writing unit tests to test MVC 3 controllers. I want to ensure that that the view that comes back from the controller is the right view. In my unit test I have:

[Test]
            public void It_Should_Return_The_Right_Page()
            {
                FormController fc = this.CreateFormController();
                var view = fc.FindX();
                Assert.AreEqual("FindX", view.ViewName);
            }

In my controller, I have:

public ViewResult FindX()
        {
            return View();
        }

This fails because ViewName is null. If I change the call to say return View("FindX") and explicitly define the view to be returned, it works. However, I would like to avoid this if possible. Is there a generally accepted way to approach this?

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2  
possible duplicate of ViewResult.ViewName property empty in unit test –  Anton Gogolev May 19 '11 at 13:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you don't set a viewname, then isn't ViewName being null the correct and expected outcome, so code your test accordingly.

Assert.IsNull(view.ViewName);
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@Xhalent - It would be, but I want to make a test that says "The action that was returned is the right one.", so I need to tie to something specifically to that action. It looks like ViewBag.Title is a reasonable choice after looking into it, since that will have the right title for the page. –  skaz May 19 '11 at 13:22
    
Then set the viewname in the controller. You don't have to leave it blank. That's what I do as a matter of course, even if the view matches the action name. –  Xhalent May 19 '11 at 13:28
    
@Xhalent - sorry - I think I didn't explain myself well enough. I am aware that I can set the name in the controller, but it felt a little weird to have an explicit string literal in there, as the default with no parameter would go to the correct View anyway. I was wondering if there was a better method. –  skaz May 19 '11 at 13:58
    
@skaz. Good point, I wouldn't recommend the testing of assigned literals either. I set the action strings as constants in the controller class and then compare against those constants. Is this what you're after? –  Xhalent May 19 '11 at 14:07
    
@Xhalent - Can you elaborate in more detail? Thanks. –  skaz May 19 '11 at 14:47

It sounds like what you want to convey is: Assert that the default view for this method was returned. One way to convey this is using this line:

var view = fc.FindX();

Assert.IsNull(view.ViewName) 

But this doesn't convey your intent very well. One way to convey it more clearly is to create an extension method on ActionResult or ViewResult called AssertIsDefaultView like so:

public static class ActionResultAssertions
{
    public static void AssertIsDefaultView(this ActionResult actionResult)
    {
        var viewResult = actionResult as ViewResult;

        Assert.IsNotNull(viewResult);
        Assert.IsNull(viewResult.ViewName);
    }
}

Then in your test you can say:

var view = fc.FindX();
view.AssertIsDefaultView();

MvcContrib has a set of these assertions (I think the name of the method is AssertViewRendered), but I prefer to just write the extensions myself so I can understand MVC better.

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The line 'Assert.IsNull(viewResult.ViewName);' should read 'Assert.IsTrue(string.IsEmpty(viewResult.ViewName))'. In my case this property is never null but empty. Apart from that I like this response as it shows a way how to better express the intention of the test. –  Manfred Jan 20 '12 at 22:20
    
or even Assert.IsNullOrEmpty(viewResult.ViewName); –  Duncan Sep 17 '12 at 13:44

that worked for me

public ViewResult FindX()
    {
        return View("FindX");
    }
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