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In my NodeJS express application I have app.js that has a few common routes. Then in a wf.js file I would like to define a few more routes.

How can I get app.js to recognize other route handlers defined in wf.js file?

A simple require does not seem to work.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 194 down vote accepted

If you want to put the routes in a separate file, for example routes.js, you can create the routes.js file in this way:

module.exports = function(app){

    app.get('/login', function(req, res){
        res.render('login', {
            title: 'Express Login'
        });
    });

    //other routes..
}

And then you can require it from app.js passing the app object in this way:

require('./routes')(app);

Have also a look at these examples

https://github.com/visionmedia/express/tree/master/examples/route-separation

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2  
Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks. – rafidude May 19 '11 at 18:11
7  
Actually, the author (TJ Holowaychuck) gives a better approche: vimeo.com/56166857 – avetisk Mar 23 '13 at 9:36
2  
somehow this answer cleared up a lot of questions I had about module.exports. amazing. – ajniN Jul 9 '13 at 2:29
    
Solves the routing issue for multiple files, but functions defined in app.js are not accessible in routes. – XIMRX May 12 '14 at 12:04
4  
If you need some functions just put them into another module/file and require it from both app.js and routes.js – BFil May 12 '14 at 12:08

Building on @ShadowCloud 's example I was able to dynamically include all routes in a sub directory.

routes/index.js

var fs = require('fs');

module.exports = function(app){
    fs.readdirSync(__dirname).forEach(function(file) {
        if (file == "index.js") return;
        var name = file.substr(0, file.indexOf('.'));
        require('./' + name)(app);
    });
}

Then placing route files in the routes directory like so:

routes/test1.js

module.exports = function(app){

    app.get('/test1/', function(req, res){
        //...
    });

    //other routes..
}

Repeating that for as many times as I needed and then finally in app.js placing

require('./routes')(app);
share|improve this answer
    
i like this approach better, allows to add new routes without having to add anything specific to the main app file. – Jason Miesionczek Sep 8 '11 at 4:00
2  
Nice, I use this approach as well, with an additional check of the file extension as I have faced issues with swp files. – Geekfish Jan 26 '12 at 23:53
    
You also don't have to use readdirSync w/ this, readdir works fine. – Paul May 22 '12 at 17:09
3  
Is there any overhead in using this method to read the files in the directory vs. just requiring the routes in your app.js file? – Abadaba Nov 29 '12 at 3:08
    
I'd also like to know the same as @Abadaba. When does this get evaluated, when you launch the server or on every request? – bababa Mar 7 '13 at 0:02

And build yet more on the previous answer, this version of routes/index.js will ignore any files not ending in .js (and itself)

var fs = require('fs');

module.exports = function(app) {
    fs.readdirSync(__dirname).forEach(function(file) {
        if (file === "index.js" || file.substr(file.lastIndexOf('.') + 1) !== 'js')
            return;
        var name = file.substr(0, file.indexOf('.'));
        require('./' + name)(app);
    });
}
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Thanks for this. I had someone on a Mac adding .DS_Store files and it was messing everything up. – Trevor Senior Nov 23 '12 at 21:04

Full recursive routing of all .js files inside /routes folder, put this in app.js.

// Initialize ALL routes including subfolders
var fs = require('fs');
var path = require('path');

function recursiveRoutes(folderName) {
    fs.readdirSync(folderName).forEach(function(file) {

        var fullName = path.join(folderName, file);
        var stat = fs.lstatSync(fullName);

        if (stat.isDirectory()) {
            recursiveRoutes(fullName);
        } else if (file.toLowerCase().indexOf('.js')) {
            require('./' + fullName)(app);
            console.log("require('" + fullName + "')");
        }
    });
}
recursiveRoutes('routes'); // Initialize it

in /routes you put whatevername.js and initialize your routes like this:

module.exports = function(app) {
    app.get('/', function(req, res) {
        res.render('index', { title: 'index' });
    });

    app.get('/contactus', function(req, res) {
        res.render('contactus', { title: 'contactus' });
    });
}
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One tweak to all of these answers:

var routes = fs.readdirSync('routes')
      .filter(function(v){
         return (/.js$/).test(v);
      });

Just use a regex to filter via testing each file in the array. It is not recursive, but it will filter out folders that don't end in .js

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I know this is an old question, but I was trying to figure out something like for myself and this is the place I ended up on, so I wanted to put my solution to a similar problem in case someone else has the same issues I'm having. There's a nice node module out there called consign that does a lot of the file system stuff that is seen here for you (ie - no readdirSync stuff). For example:

I have a restful API application I'm trying to build and I want to put all of the requests that go to '/api/*' to be authenticated and I want to store all of my routes that go in api into their own directory (let's just call it 'api'). In the main part of the app:

app.use('/api', [authenticationMiddlewareFunction], require('./routes/api'));

Inside of the routes directory, I have a directory called "api" and a file called api.js. In api.js, I simply have:

var express = require('express');
var router = express.Router();
var consign = require('consign');

// get all routes inside the api directory and attach them to the api router
// all of these routes should be behind authorization
consign({cwd: 'routes'})
  .include('api')
  .into(router);

module.exports = router;

Everything worked as expected. Hope this helps someone.

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I have a 'require' method working in Express 3.4.8.

If you just wanted a separate .js file to better organize your routes, just create a variable in the app.js file pointing to its location in the filesystem:

var wf = require(./routes/wf);

then,

app.get('/wf', wf.foo );

where .foo is some function declared in your wf.js file.

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+1. This is the approach shown in the official example here: github.com/strongloop/express/tree/master/examples/… – Matt Browne May 19 '15 at 19:40
    
Does this work for sharing global functions and variables under app.js? Or would you have to "pass" them into wf.foo, etc. since they're out of scope as with the other presented solutions? I'm referring to the case where normally you'd access shared variables/functions in wf.foo if it wasn't separated out of app.js. – David Mar 23 at 2:12
    
yes it does , if you declare the 'foo' function in app.js then app.get('/wf', foo); will work – NiallJG Mar 23 at 2:18

I guess you're looking for a better modular approach, such as described by TJ himself:

http://vimeo.com/56166857

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I don't see how the video answers the question of how to organize routes into multiple files. – Matt Browne May 19 '15 at 19:43
    
Never mind, I watched the video too quickly...I see now that he's actually creating a separate Express app instance for each file. – Matt Browne May 19 '15 at 19:53

This is possibly the most awesome stack overflow question/answer(s) ever. I love Sam's/Brad's solutions above. Thought I'd chime in with the async version that I implemented:

function loadRoutes(folder){
    if (!folder){
        folder = __dirname + '/routes/';
    }

    fs.readdir(folder, function(err, files){
        var l = files.length;
        for (var i = 0; i < l; i++){
            var file = files[i];
            fs.stat(file, function(err, stat){
                if (stat && stat.isDirectory()){
                    loadRoutes(folder + '/' + file + '/');
                } else {
                    var dot = file.lastIndexOf('.');
                    if (file.substr(dot + 1) === 'js'){
                        var name = file.substr(0, dot);

                        // I'm also passing argv here (from optimist)
                        // so that I can easily enable debugging for all
                        // routes.
                        require(folder + name)(app, argv);
                    }
                }
            });
        }
    });
}

My directory structure is a little different. I typically define routes in app.js (in the root directory of the project) by require-ing './routes'. Consequently, I'm skipping the check against index.js because I want to include that one as well.

EDIT: You can also put this in a function and call it recursively (I edited the example to show this) if you want to nest your routes in folders of arbitrary depth.

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2  
Why would you want an aysnc version? Presumably you want to set up all your routes before starting to serve traffic or else you could end up sending some 'false' 404s. – Joe Abrams Dec 2 '13 at 23:50
6  
Indeed. I wrote it whilst still learning node. I agree in retrospect that it doesn't make sense. – tandrewnichols Dec 3 '13 at 1:38

Even though this an older question I stumbled here looking for a solution to a similar issue. After trying some of the solutions here I ended up going a different direction and thought I would add my solution for anyone else who ends up here.

In express 4.x you can get an instance of the router object and import another file that contains more routes. You can even do this recursively so your routes import other routes allowing you to create easy to maintain url paths. For example if I have a separate route file for my '/tests' endpoint already and want to add a new set of routes for '/tests/automated' I may want to break these '/automated' routes out into a another file to keep my '/test' file small and easy to manage. It also lets you logically group routes together by URL path which can be really convenient.

Contents of ./app.js:

var express = require('express'),
    app = express();

var testRoutes = require('./routes/tests');

// Import my test routes into the path '/test'
app.use('/tests', testRoutes);

Contents of ./routes/tests.js

var express = require('express'),
    router = express.Router();

var automatedRoutes = require('./testRoutes/automated');

router
  // Add a binding to handle '/test'
  .get('/', function(){
    // render the /tests view
  })

  // Import my automated routes into the path '/tests/automated'
  // This works because we're already within the '/tests' route so we're simply appending more routes to the '/tests' endpoint
  .use('/automated', automatedRoutes);

module.exports = router;

Contents of ./routes/testRoutes/automated.js:

var express = require('express'),
    router = express.Router();

router
   // Add a binding for '/tests/automated/'
  .get('/', function(){
    // render the /tests/automated view
  })

module.exports = router;
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