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Possible Duplicate:
delegate not being called

I declared a delegate in my appdelegate class, so it looks like:

@protocol LoginDelegate

- (void) loadData:(NSObject *)viewCon;

@end

@class RootViewController;

@class DetailViewController;


@interface TestAppDelegate : NSObject <UIApplicationDelegate, LoginViewControllerDelegate, RKObjectLoaderDelegate> {
   id <LoginDelegate> delegate;
}

@property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet UIWindow *window;
@property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet UISplitViewController *splitViewController;
@property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet RootViewController *rootViewController;
@property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet DetailViewController *detailViewController;
@property (nonatomic, assign) id <LoginDelegate> delegate;

@end

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
    //some code
         [self.delegate loadData:self];
    //some code

    return YES;
}

In my other class then I implement this delegate:

- (void) loadData:(NSObject*)viewCon
{
    NSLog(@"LOADING DATA");
    [[RKObjectManager sharedManager] loadObjectsAtResourcePath:@"/groups.json" delegate: self];
}

However, why is it not getting called?

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marked as duplicate by Josh Caswell, Jeff Atwood May 20 '11 at 5:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
where do you set the delegate? –  Nick Weaver May 19 '11 at 14:00
    
what do you mean by set the delegate? –  aherlambang May 19 '11 at 14:32
    
You are sending the loadData message in the UIApplicationDelegate method didFinishLaunchingWithOptions to self.delegate. Where do you set self.delegate? In case you've created your project with a template the appDelegate class inherits directly from NSObject and doesn't have a delegate field. –  Nick Weaver May 19 '11 at 14:36
    
@Nick, yes this is a project created with a template and it inherits directly from NSObject... I am just confused as I usually set the delegate when creating it, in this case I don't know who created the app delegate –  aherlambang May 19 '11 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is not getting called, because you dont set something as delegate (I assume).

So self.delegate is nil, and as u can send any message to nil, nothings happens

Do you have ((TestAppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication]).delegate = self or ((TestAppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication]).delegate = aObject somewhere, where self or aObject conforms to your LoginDelegate?

See: Delegation and Protocols

share|improve this answer
    
yes I have actually done that.. I edited my code above –  aherlambang May 19 '11 at 14:14
    
actually yes self.delegate is nil... –  aherlambang May 19 '11 at 14:17
    
I used to declare delegates like what I have above and it usually works.. I never have that code you wrote –  aherlambang May 19 '11 at 14:19
    
hmm, maybe in-between the delegate got deallocated? –  vikingosegundo May 19 '11 at 14:20
    
not sure... I don't think so –  aherlambang May 19 '11 at 14:21

You've declared the protocol, and you've implemented it in your delegate class, but do you actually create an instance of the other class and set it as the value of the app delegate's delegate property?

In your app delegate you have the following line:

id <LoginDelegate> delegate;

This creates an empty variable that can point to a delegate object, just like when you create an integer variable like

int x;

you have created a variable that can hold an integer. But when you first create the variable, it doesn't have a value. You need to assign the variable an actual value before you use it.

int x;
y = 5 + x;  // This makes no sense, because you haven't given x a value, right?

In the code you posted, you never give your appDelegate's delegate variable a value. You need to do something like:

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
    MyDelegateObject *delegateObject = [[MyDelegateObject alloc] init];
    delegate = delegateObject;
    // now you can send the delegate a message, because the delegate exists!
    [self.delegate loadData:self];
    return YES;
}
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can you show some code on that? –  aherlambang May 19 '11 at 14:17
    
at some point you need to say: myTestAppDelegate.delegate = someDelegateObject; –  Dancreek May 19 '11 at 14:19
    
the issue is that my delegate is nil... is this because of that? –  aherlambang May 19 '11 at 14:25
    
yes. The delegate does not assign its self. At some point you need to create and assign it. –  Dancreek May 19 '11 at 14:33
    
but what is it that I need to assign it to? –  aherlambang May 19 '11 at 14:37

Ok, couple of things to sum up a lot of the discussion here.

A protocol like:

@protocol LoginDelegate

- (void) loadData:(NSObject *)viewCon;

@end

is just a set of methods that any class can implement. When you declare that protocol you are just saying, "Here is a set of methods that I want to refer to by a single name." Then any custom class can say "I implement the methods in this set (protocol)" by including this in its @interface line. Something like:

@interface SomeOtherClass : NSObject <LoginDelegate>

When you declare a property in your TestAppDelegate like so:

@property (nonatomic, assign) id <LoginDelegate> delegate;

Its no different than creating any other property, like an NSString or whatever. You are just saying that the TestAppDelegate will have a property that is some object of an unknown class (id) that implements the methods listed in the LoginDelegate protocol (<LoginDelegate>).

Now, like any other property, you need to assign an object to that value. If you had property that was an NSString called myString, myString would be nil until you assigned some string to it. Likewise you have a property arbitrarily called "delegate" that needs something assigned to it. Note that many, many other classes (like RKObjectManager) use delegates as well and also refer to them as "delegate". Just because you assign something called "delegate" to one object it does not mean that you have assigned anything to the delegate property belonging to your TestAppDelegate.

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Yes, I get all that.. however usually I set/assign the delegate from the class that creates this class. In my case I don't know who created the AppDelegate –  aherlambang May 19 '11 at 15:55
    
An object can set its own delegate. Something like: self.delegate = someOtherObject; –  Dancreek May 19 '11 at 16:36

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