Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have two .cpp files: oranges.cpp and basket.cpp. They have the classes orange and basket, respectively. My main program generates many baskets which in turn generate many oranges. So basically, main will have many objects of Baskets; and baskets will have many objects of Oranges. If I have a function in orange that needs to know the color of my basket, how would I go about finding the color of the basket?

orangle.cpp

class oranges
{
    void whichColorBasket()
    {
        // get the color of the basket the orange is in...?
    }
}

basket.cpp

class basket
{
    int color;

    void basket()
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)              
            oranges *o = new oranges;
    }
}

I know my syntax may not be perfect but how would I access the datamember of basket from a function in orange (orange is an object created by basket).

Sending the color a parameter isn't an option as there are too many oranges and the color of the basket may change during runtime.

I read somewhere that static functions would do the trick, but they only work if they are in the same .cpp file.

So, what do I do?

share|improve this question
2  
I see coupling here. This is your problem. You might want to pass a pointer to the color to your orange but that breaks encapsulation. –  the_drow May 19 '11 at 14:23
add comment

11 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Static functions are almost certainly not the answer here.

You would probably need to pass a reference to the "parent" Basket to the Oranges object, which it can then interrogate to find the colour.

For example:

class Basket
{
public:
    void Basket() {
        Oranges *o = new Oranges(*this);
    }

    color getColor() const { ... }
};


class Oranges
{
private:
    const Basket &myBasket;

public:
    Oranges(const Basket &b) : myBasket(b) {} // Store reference

    color getColor() const { return myBasket.getColor(); }  // Interrogate my basket

};

Whether you use a pointer or a reference will depend on whether the Oranges can ever move between Baskets.

share|improve this answer
add comment

you'll need a reference in orange pointing to the basket the orange is in

class oranges{
    basket* b;
    int whichColorBasket() {
        return b->color;
    }
}


class basket{
     int color;

     void basket(){
         for(int i=0;i<10;i++){         
              oranges *o=new oranges;
              o->b = &this;
         }
     } 
}

I'm ignoring memory leaks here

share|improve this answer
add comment

You need to somehow bind oranges to the basket they belong to - for example, by passing a pointer to the basket. How you do it will depend on whether oranges can change their binding to a backet during their lifetime and whether backet can be destroyed before all oranges in it are destroyed.

Assuming oranges never outlive the basket and never change the basket you do it this way:

class oranges{
public:
  oranges( backet* object ) { belongsTo = object; }
  void whichColorBasket() {
      here get belongsTo->color;
  }         
private:
  backet* belongsTo;
 };

 class basket{
     int color;
     void basket(){
         for(int i=0;i<10;i++)              
            oranges *o=new oranges( this ); //pass "current object"
     }
 };
share|improve this answer
    
how would I include these files. As of right now the first line of basket.cpp is #include "oranges.h" I'm guessing that referencing baskets in oranges will not work since it won't find baskets. –  sleeping.ninja May 19 '11 at 14:39
1  
That's what forward declarations are for. At the top of oranges.h add the line: class basket; This will allow the orange header to contain pointers and references to Basket without including basket.h. (basket.h will have a #include "orange.h", and if orange.h includes basket.h you would have a circular reference. The forward declaration breaks this cycle.) –  RobH May 23 '11 at 7:22
    
Thanks. I can't believe my CS class never covered stuff like this. –  sleeping.ninja May 25 '11 at 18:40
add comment

Your oranges object should have an instance variable basket representing the basket it's in. Add a method putInBasket which takes a basket and sets the variable to the basket it's in. Then the orange looks at the variable in the whichColorBasket method. If basket is NULL it's not in a basket.

This isn't the best design, though, cause it provides a potential for inconsistency. A basket might think it has an orange, but the orange's basket pointer could point to a different basket. Should an orange really know the color of the basket it's in? What's the use case? If you're only handling baskets, and you have an orange, perhaps the basket should have a isOrangeHere method, which tells you whether a given orange is there. You call it on all the baskets, and then you take the color of the one that returns true.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The simple answer is that you don't. If you have to, there is a problem in your design somewhere: what kind of orange would know what basket it is in? And what if the orange isn't in a basket?

If you need to support this in some way, the "proper" solution would be something along the lines of the Observer pattern; your fruit would be an observer of its container; when you put the fruit into a container, the container would register with the fruit, and when you took the fruit out, the container would deregister. Clients could then ask the fruit for their current container, and ask it whatever they want.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Add a property to oranges that contains a reference to the parent basket. In the method for adding oranges to basket, also set the parent to the basket.

class oranges{
    basket* basket;

    void oranged(basket* bask)
    {
       basket = bask;
    }
    int whichColorBasket() {
       return basket->color;
    }
}

class basket{
     int color;

     void basket(){
         for(int i=0;i<10;i++)              
              oranges *o=new oranges(&this);
     }         
}

This syntax may be wrong but this is how its normally done.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I figured that as a possible solution but it didn't seem very safe. –  sleeping.ninja May 19 '11 at 14:24
    
If the basket is null, it doesn't belong to a basket. What did you mean by safe? –  Shawn Mclean May 19 '11 at 14:35
    
I meant it sort of breaks encapsulation. Anyway how would I include these files. As of right now the first line of basket.cpp is #include "oranges.h" I'm guessing that referencing baskets in oranges will not work since it won't find baskets. –  sleeping.ninja May 19 '11 at 14:40
2  
Actually, giving Orange a reference to its parent basket doesn't 'break encapsulation', it is precisely the correct way for Orange to access Basket safely. Your accepted answer (from @Covar), however, does break encapsulation. Encapsulation means that you don't allow one object to monkey around with another object's internals other than through public interfaces. Passing a pointer or reference to Basket allows you to access its public interfaces. Passing a pointer to a Basket data member gives you direct non-public monkeying access. –  RobH May 23 '11 at 7:26
2  
This is also how Microsoft built their Control class in the .net framework. –  Shawn Mclean May 23 '11 at 15:24
show 2 more comments

Since you're using C++ use a pointer in your oranges. int *basket_color; then just assign it the address of the baskets color basket_color = &color

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the best solution. Most of the other solutions pass pointers to the basket object around. Passing a pointer to a single color integer instead seems safer. –  sleeping.ninja May 19 '11 at 17:28
1  
Passing a pointer to one of Basket's data members is a pretty typical failure of encapsulation. Straight away, you have granted Orange the ability to change its basket's colour any time it wants to. Oli's answer (appears below for me) is the correct, OO-safe way of doing things. –  RobH May 23 '11 at 7:18
    
My point of view was that passing an object pointer to another object would grant the other object a lot of privilege such as calling functions and using members. Passing a single member would isolate the access to only that variable. But I guess you're right from an OO perspective it would break encapsulation. –  sleeping.ninja May 25 '11 at 18:43
add comment

The way to avoid the coupling is to ask each basket if it contains a specific orange. If it does, check its color.

Why should the orange care about the basket's color? What about the apples in the other basket? Are they interested too?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your oranges class could have a basket member variable that references the basket that contains it. Then, when an oranges object wants to know the colour of its containing basket it just calls gets the value of myBasket.color.

The oranges constructor would have to initialise this member variable, so it would need a basket parameter.

share|improve this answer
add comment

EDIT: Completely redid this solution as I had missed on a key constraint.

Another possible way would be to add a member variable to the orange class like so:

class oranges
{
    private:
    int m_nBasketID;

    public:
    oranges(int nID = 0)
    {
       m_nBasketID = nID;
    }

    void whichColorBasket() 
    {
        return gBasketList[m_nBasketID].color;
    }
}

And to set the value while creating the oranges in the basket class, like so:

class basket
{
   static unsigned int nBasketID;
 public:
 int color;
 void basket()
 {
     //First basket will have ID = 1 because
     //0 is reserved for unknown/uninitialized state.
     nBasketID++;

     for(int i=0;i<10;i++)              
          oranges *o=new oranges(nBasketID);

     gBasketList.push_back(*this);
 }

Additional modifications are as follows:

unsigned int basket::nBasketID = 0;
std::vector<basket> gBasketList;

I've made a couple of assumptions here:

  1. There is a known value (such as zero) that can be used to represent an unknown/uninitialized colour state. This value can be used a default value in the constructor of oranges.
  2. The oranges do not switch baskets after creation. If this use-case needs to be addressed then may you could delete the orange from the original basket and add a new one to the destination basekt or provide a member function to handle this case etc.
share|improve this answer
1  
this is a very bad solution as the orange still has a colour when it is not inside of a basket and/or depending who is working witrh the orange he can remove it from one basket and putting it in another and forget to change the colour ... –  Angel O'Sphere May 19 '11 at 15:10
    
I agree that the solution isnt complete since I missed "color of the basket may change during runtime" constraint. However, the concern that "orange still has a colour when it is not inside of a basket" isnt valid as colour is a member of orange & can be changed anytime. For moving oranges, see assumption #2 in the original post. –  Bhargav Bhat May 19 '11 at 16:05
    
You are really suggesting (i) public access to internal data members and (ii) a global list of objects? Wow. –  RobH May 23 '11 at 7:29
add comment
class Basket{

private: int color; Orange orangeObj; public:

Basket(int color,const Orange o)
{
    orangeObj=o;
    o.setBasketColor(color);
}
//.......

void setColor(int x){color=x;}
int getColor()const{return color;}

Orange getOrangeObj()const{return orangeObj;}

};

class Orange{ private: //...

int colorOfBasket; //the color of the basket the orange obj is in

public: Orange(){

}

void setBasketColor(int x){colorOfBasket=x;}
int getBasketColor()const{return colorOfBasket;}

};

Note: you may construct the basket class to keep a list of the orange objects, this example is just to illustrate how the classes should be organized.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.