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What is wrong in this code?

#include <map>

template<typename T>
struct TMap
{
    typedef std::map<T, T> Type;
};

template<typename T>
T test(typename TMap <T>::Type &tmap_) { return 0.0; }

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    TMap<double>::Type tmap;
    tmap[1.1] = 5.2;
    double d = test(tmap); //Error: could not deduce template argument for T
    return 0;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 57 down vote accepted

That is non-deducible context. That is why the template argument cannot be deduced by the compiler.

Just imagine, you might have specialized TMap as follows:

template <>
struct TMap<SomeType>
{
    typedef std::map <double, double> Type;
};

How would the compiler deduce the type SomeType, given that TMap<SomeType>::Type is std::map<double, double>? It cannot. Its NOT guaranteed that the type which you use in std::map is also the type in TMap. The compiler cannot make this dangerous assumption. There may not any relation between the type arguments, whatsoever.

Also, you might have other specialization of TMap defined as:

template <>
struct TMap<OtherType>
{
    typedef std::map <double, double> Type;
};

This makes the situation even worse. Now you've the following:

  • TMap<SomeType>::Type = std::map<double, double>.
  • TMap<OtherType>::Type = std::map<double, double>.

Now ask yourself: given TMap<T>::Type is std::map<double, double>, how would the compiler know whether T is SomeType or OtherType? It cannot even know how many such choices it has, neither can it know the choices themselves.. I'm just asking you for the sake of thought-experiment (assuming it can know the complete set of choices).

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7  
Superb answer. This problem has tripped me up repeatedly and I took a very long time to understand why it’s impossible to deduce the context. Your short example shows this perfectly. –  Konrad Rudolph May 19 '11 at 15:18
    
So I have to write: double d = test<double>(tmap) ? –  Johnas May 19 '11 at 15:28
    
@Johans: Yes. .... –  Nawaz May 19 '11 at 15:30
1  
if only, I could give this answer +10. So thorough and precise answer, compared to the complexity of the topic. –  Ramadheer Singh May 19 '11 at 18:54
3  
This is essentially an inverse-function problem: Given an output value, you're asking for the input point at which your function takes that value. However, functions aren't invertible in general, so the question doesn't even exist unless you require your function to be an invertible one. In the template scenario, the corresponding requirement would be that all templates have globally unique member names; a requirement that C++ does not make. –  Kerrek SB Oct 28 '11 at 10:47

Exactly what the compiler error message says: in TMap<T>::Type, T is not deduceable according to the standard. The motivation for this is probably that it isn't technically possible to implement: the compiler would have to instantiate all possible TMap<T> in order to see if one (and only one) matched the type you passed. And there is an infinite number of TMap<T>.

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I think you made a mistake here – the compiler “only” has to consider the transitive closure of all existing specialisations and deduce the best match. This is a finite (but potentially still very large) number of instantiations. But apart from that there may simply be several equally good matches (see Nawaz’ example). –  Konrad Rudolph May 19 '11 at 15:20
    
No. In many cases, there won't be any existing specializations. And even if there are, type induction can trigger a new specialization. –  James Kanze May 19 '11 at 15:34
    
@James If there are no specialisations then the situation is “easy”: just try a pattern matching over the typedef to deduce the template argument. This should be feasible in principle. –  Konrad Rudolph May 19 '11 at 15:43
    
@Konrad: Even if there are no specializations, the situation is not easy. Its not safe to assume that type argument to std::map is same or somehow depending on the type of the TMap. Its therefore not feasible. –  Nawaz May 19 '11 at 15:48
1  
The worst problem is of course that template metaprogramming is Turing Complete. And that in turn means that the necessary pattern matching is equivalent to solving the halting problem (i.e. write the specialization of A<N>::B so that B is typedef'ed to int iff N represents an algorithm that halts) –  MSalters May 20 '11 at 11:06

Even you have:

TMap<SomeType>::Type = std::map<double, double>. 

But before you call test(tmap)

TMap<double>::Type tmap;
tmap[1.1] = 5.2;
double d = test(tmap); 

You already have it declared as

TMap<double>::Type tmap;

why this information can not be utilized. #typedef is not just simple string replacement.

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