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I need to get a value that uniquely identifies the current windows user's logon session. This is for a winforms app, not ASP.NET. I'll be retrieving this from within multiple processes so it needs to return the same value when retrieved within the same logon session. It only needs to be unique on the current machine for the duration of all user sessions - e.g. until the machine is next restarted.

I think the Windows Logon Id is the right thing, but seems a bit of a pain to retrieve. Is there anything else or any easier way to get this?

I'll be using the ID to include in an address of a named pipes service to communicate between two processes running on the machine. I want to include the Logon Id to avoid conflicts when there are multiple users logged in, including perhaps multiple sessions of the same user.

share|improve this question
    
If the user logs out and logs back in, is it acceptable to get the same ID? –  Gabe May 19 '11 at 16:56
    
no, that should be another id as it's another session. –  Rory May 19 '11 at 21:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way to get Session Id is to look at Process.SessionId property:

System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().SessionId

The value is the same as returned by GetTokenInformation(...,TokenSessionId,...).

Note: One thing you should keep in mind is that Session Id is not a Logon Id. For example, on Win7 elevated process launched under the same user in the same session will have different LogonId (copmaring to non-elevated one), but will have the same SessionId. Even runniung non-elevated process with RunAs explicitly specifying credentials of the same user will create new Logon Sesison Id. Such behavior has meaning, for example, when you map network drives. Since Vista, a process with one token LogonId will not see network dirves mapped with another LogonId, even if processes are running in the same session and under same user.

Below is the sample app that you can launch on different sessions/creds to see the difference:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace GetCurrentSessionId
{
    class Program
    {

        enum TokenInformationClass
        {
            TokenUser = 1,
            TokenGroups,
            TokenPrivileges,
            TokenOwner,
            TokenPrimaryGroup,
            TokenDefaultDacl,
            TokenSource,
            TokenType,
            TokenImpersonationLevel,
            TokenStatistics,
            TokenRestrictedSids,
            TokenSessionId,
            TokenGroupsAndPrivileges,
            TokenSessionReference,
            TokenSandBoxInert,
            TokenAuditPolicy,
            TokenOrigin
        }

        enum TokenType
        {
            TokenPrimary = 1, 
            TokenImpersonation
        }

        enum SecurityImpersonationLevel 
        { 
            SecurityAnonymous,
            SecurityIdentification,
            SecurityImpersonation,
            SecurityDelegation
        }

        [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
        struct TokenStatistics
        {
            public Int64 TokenId;
            public Int64 AuthenticationId;
            public Int64 ExpirationTime;
            public TokenType TokenType;
            public SecurityImpersonationLevel ImpersonationLevel;
            public Int32 DynamicCharged;
            public Int32 DynamicAvailable;
            public Int32 GroupCount;
            public Int32 PrivilegeCount;
            public Int64 ModifiedId;
        }

        struct TokenOrigin
        {
            public Int64 OriginatingLogonSession;
        }

        [DllImport("advapi32.dll", EntryPoint = "GetTokenInformation", SetLastError = true)]
        static extern bool GetTokenInformation(
            IntPtr tokenHandle,
            TokenInformationClass tokenInformationClass,
            IntPtr tokenInformation,
            int tokenInformationLength,
            out int ReturnLength);

        public const int ERROR_INSUFFICIENT_BUFFER = 0x7a;

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Session Id: {0}", System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().SessionId);

                IntPtr tokenInfo;
                bool result;
                int infoSize;

                IntPtr hToken = System.Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent().Token;

                result = GetTokenInformation(hToken, TokenInformationClass.TokenStatistics, IntPtr.Zero, 0, out infoSize);
                if (!result && Marshal.GetLastWin32Error() == ERROR_INSUFFICIENT_BUFFER)
                {
                    tokenInfo = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(infoSize);
                    result = GetTokenInformation(hToken, TokenInformationClass.TokenStatistics, tokenInfo, infoSize, out infoSize);
                    if (result)
                    {
                        TokenStatistics tokenStats = (TokenStatistics)Marshal.PtrToStructure(tokenInfo, typeof(TokenStatistics));
                        Console.WriteLine("LogonId: 0x{0:X16}", tokenStats.AuthenticationId);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        Console.Error.WriteLine("LogonId: FAILED with 0x{0:X08}", Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());
                    }
                    Marshal.FreeHGlobal(tokenInfo);
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.Error.WriteLine("LogonId: FAILED with 0x{0:X08}", Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());
                }


                tokenInfo = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(sizeof (Int32));
                result = GetTokenInformation(hToken, TokenInformationClass.TokenSessionId, tokenInfo, sizeof (Int32), out infoSize);
                if (result)
                {
                    int tokenSessionId = Marshal.ReadInt32(tokenInfo);
                    Console.WriteLine("TokenSessionId: {0}", tokenSessionId);
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.Error.WriteLine("TokenSessionId: FAILED with 0x{0:X08}", Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());
                }

                Marshal.FreeHGlobal(tokenInfo);


                result = GetTokenInformation(hToken, TokenInformationClass.TokenOrigin, IntPtr.Zero, 0, out infoSize);
                if (!result && Marshal.GetLastWin32Error() == ERROR_INSUFFICIENT_BUFFER)
                {
                    tokenInfo = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(infoSize);
                    result = GetTokenInformation(hToken, TokenInformationClass.TokenOrigin, tokenInfo, infoSize, out infoSize);
                    if (result)
                    {
                        TokenOrigin tokenOrigin = (TokenOrigin) Marshal.PtrToStructure(tokenInfo, typeof (TokenOrigin));
                        Console.WriteLine("OriginatingSessionId: 0x{0:X16}", tokenOrigin.OriginatingLogonSession);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("OriginatingSessionId: FAILED with 0x{0:X08}", Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());
                    }
                    Marshal.FreeHGlobal(tokenInfo);
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("OriginatingSessionId: FAILED with 0x{0:X08}", Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());
                }

                Console.WriteLine("Press any key...");
                Console.ReadKey();

            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.Error.WriteLine("Unexpected error: {0}", ex);
                Console.ReadKey();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this useful code. Please note that the OriginatingSessionId is NOT unique. When the user logs off and logs on again this stays the same value. –  Elmue Sep 10 at 19:08

How about a generating a GUID?

You can get the string representation of a GUID this way:

string UniqueIdentifier = System.Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I didn't make clear that it needs to be the same when retrieved from multiple processes. i.e. needs to identify the logon session, not just be unique. –  Rory May 19 '11 at 15:39

You can try Environment.UserDomainName & Environment.UserName

To ensure a unique id for each user session I guess you'll have to use the painful method you mentioned - How to get the logon SID in c#.

share|improve this answer
    
What if the user is logged in twice? –  Gabe May 19 '11 at 15:37
    
@Gabe - good point. Updated. –  YetAnotherUser May 19 '11 at 15:44
    
can the same user log into a machine twice using the same credentials? I always thought you'd get redirected back to your existing session. Need to test I guess. :) –  Zach Bonham May 19 '11 at 16:12
    
@Zach yes i guess you can. Though using rdp it kicks you to your original account. But how about a service running with a user credential, and user logged on to the machine. –  YetAnotherUser May 19 '11 at 16:16
1  
@YetA: A single user can have multiple interactive sessions with RDP or MultiPoint Server (microsoft.com/windows/multipoint/default.aspx) so long as policy is configured that way. However, you've just posted a link to the same solution that the OP mentioned he was trying to avoid, so it doesn't help. –  Gabe May 19 '11 at 16:55

If I understand you correctly you can generate a GUID

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I didn't make clear that it needs to be the same when retrieved from multiple processes. i.e. needs to identify the logon session, not just be unique –  Rory May 19 '11 at 15:40

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