Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following simplified version of my code. I have a template class A, a template function Fill, and a specialization of the function to work with basic types like int or char, and another specialization to work with A:

#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

template<size_t C>
class A
{
public:
    A & operator=(std::string v) { 
        data[0] ='a';
        return *this; 
    }
    char data[C];
};

template<typename T> T Fill(std::string value, T default_value);

// Specialization for A<C>
template<size_t C>
A<C> Fill(std::string value, A<C> default_value) 
{
    if (value.empty())
        return default_value;
    A<C> result;
    result = value;
    return result;
}

// Specialization for int, double, char, etc
template<typename T>
T Fill(std::string value, T default_value)
{   
    if (value.empty())
        return default_value;

    T result;
    std::istringstream(value) >> result;
    return result;
}

void main()
{
    int abc = Fill(/*Get a string somehow*/"123", 0); // OK

    A<10> def;
    def = std::string("111");
    A<10> a;
    a = Fill(/*Get a string somehow*/"abc", def);     // OK
}

That works fine although I'm amazed that the compiler manages to match the parameter to the right template specialization.

The problem comes with some typedefs that ease the use of A<x>. Here is a simplified version:

typedef A<12> A12;
...
A<12> def12;
def12 = std::string("12");

A12 a12;
a12 = Fill(/*Get a string somehow*/"xyz", def12);       // Not OK !

The compiler does not detect that the type A12 is actually A<12> and uses the wrong specialization of the function, which does not compile because istringstream cannot parse with operator>> into an A.

How can I make it use the right template specialization ?

share|improve this question
3  
how is def declared in the second example ? –  Yochai Timmer May 19 '11 at 15:40
1  
Function templates can't be partially specialized (and you're not using the specialization syntax anyway), so in your example you're actually overloading. –  Luc Danton May 19 '11 at 17:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Template specializations are not inferred via where you're assigning the return value to. You'll have to explicitly instantiate the correct version:

a12 = Fill<A<12> >("xyz", def);

(or whatever it is that you need...)

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't the default parameter be enough ? I'd like to avoid specifying the type at the calling place. +1 coz it works though ! –  Gabriel May 19 '11 at 15:43
    
@Gabriel: In your example, the default_value is def, which is of type A<10>, which isn't the same as A<12>! (Unless I've missed something.) –  Oliver Charlesworth May 19 '11 at 15:46
    
Unless the type can be deduced from def, which I'd think should be possible if it's the same def as before.... –  aschepler May 19 '11 at 15:46
    
@Oli Charlesworth Wops ! That's fixed, thanks (: –  Gabriel May 19 '11 at 15:49
    
@Gabriel: Ok, in that case, I don't know what the issue is! I'll leave my answer up for now, though... –  Oliver Charlesworth May 19 '11 at 15:53
typedef A<12> A12;
...
A12 a12;
a12 = Fill(/*Get a string somehow*/"xyz", def);       // Not OK !

In this example, you have not shown us the type of def. Assuming that it is the same as the previous example, namely A<10>, this will certainly fail.

In your template, the type of the second parameter must match the return type. Try this:

typedef A<12> A12;
...
A12 a12;
A12 def12;
a12 = Fill(/*Get a string somehow*/"xyz", def12);       // OK !
share|improve this answer

The compiler does not detect that the type A12 is actually A<12> and uses the wrong specialization of the function

Actually since you're passing A<12> def; in your example (mistake?), the correct overload (see my comment on the question) should be picked. The fact that you're assigning the result to A12 a; shouldn't affect overload resolution.

If you meant the opposite (passing A12 and assigning to whatever) then this could be a compiler deficiency. This works correctly here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.