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How can I select count(*) from two different tables (call them tab1 and tab2) having as result:

Count_1   Count_2
123       456

?

I've tried this:

select count(*) Count_1 from schema.tab1 union all select count(*) Count_2 from schema.tab2

But all I have is:

Count_1
123
456
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13 Answers

up vote 107 down vote accepted
SELECT  (
        SELECT COUNT(*)
        FROM   tab1
        ) AS count1,
        (
        SELECT COUNT(*)
        FROM   tab2
        ) AS count2
FROM    dual
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Thank you very much, quassnoi –  user73118 Mar 3 '09 at 12:42
3  
why do you need dual? what does that mean? –  codemeit Mar 3 '09 at 12:44
11  
It's a fake table with one record. You can't have SELECT without FROM in Oracle. –  Quassnoi Mar 3 '09 at 12:45
1  
dual is a table in oracle db's to which all accounts can access you can use it for common needs like: "SELECT sysdate FROM dual" –  dincer80 Mar 3 '09 at 12:47
4  
It makes no difference, Oracle won't evaluate anything inside COUNT(*). –  Quassnoi Mar 3 '09 at 12:57
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As additional information, to accomplish same thing in SQL Server, you just need to remove the "FROM dual" part of the query.

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@dincer80 thanks for your comment reply. –  codemeit Mar 3 '09 at 12:48
    
you're welcome.. –  dincer80 Mar 3 '09 at 12:50
    
I was just getting ready to say "But what about MS SQL, when I saw your comment. Thank you for anticipating the need! –  Andrew Neely May 29 '12 at 12:52
1  
Removing the "FROM dual" also works in Sqlite. –  dmanargias Feb 3 at 23:23
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Just because it's slightly different:

SELECT 'table_1' AS table_name, COUNT(*) FROM table_1
UNION
SELECT 'table_2' AS table_name, COUNT(*) FROM table_2
UNION
SELECT 'table_3' AS table_name, COUNT(*) FROM table_3

It gives the answers transposed (one row per table instead of one column), otherwise I don't think it's much different. I think performance-wise they should be equivalent.

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1  
You'd better put UNION ALL here. –  Quassnoi Mar 3 '09 at 20:31
    
What difference could adding "ALL" make with three single row queries? The results must be the same either way, surely? –  Mike Woodhouse Mar 4 '09 at 7:04
1  
UNION without ALL groups results. If there are 2 rows in table_1 and table_2, and 3 rows in table_3, you'll get two rows in your resultset, and won't be able to tell from resultset how many rows does table_2 have: 2 or 3. –  Quassnoi Mar 4 '09 at 10:40
    
Yes, but I select the table name, which makes the results unique. Otherwise you'd be correct, but what value would there be in several numbers without context? ;-) –  Mike Woodhouse Mar 4 '09 at 12:17
    
Yes, you're right, didn't notice the table name :) –  Quassnoi Mar 4 '09 at 16:15
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My experience is with SQL Server, but could you do:

select (select count(*) from table1) as count1,
  (select count(*) from table2) as count2

In SQL Server I get the result you are after.

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Other slightly different methods:

with t1_count as (select count(*) c1 from t1),
     t2_count as (select count(*) c2 from t2)
select c1,
       c2
from   t1_count,
       t2_count
/

select c1,
       c2
from   (select count(*) c1 from t1) t1_count,
       (select count(*) c2 from t2) t2_count
/
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As I can't see any other answer bring this up.

If you don't like sub-queries and have primary keys in each table you can do this:

select count(distinct tab1.id) as count_t1,
       count(distinct tab2.id) as count_t2
    from tab1, tab2

But performance wise I believe that Quassnoi's solution is better, and the one I would use.

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select (select count(*) from tab1) count_1, (select count(*) from tab2) count_2 from dual;
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If the tables (or at least a key column) are of the same type just make the union first and then count.

select count(*) 
  from (select tab1key as key from schema.tab1 
        union all 
        select tab2key as key from schema.tab2
       )

Or take your satement and put another sum() around it.

select sum(amount) from
(
select count(*) amount from schema.tab1 union all select count(*) amount from schema.tab2
)
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A quick stab came up with:

Select (select count(*) from Table1) as Count1, (select count(*) from Table2) as Count2

Note: I tested this in SQL Server, so From Dual is not necessary (hence the discrepancy).

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For a bit of completeness - this query will create a query to give you a count of all of the tables for a given owner.

select 
  DECODE(rownum, 1, '', ' UNION ALL ') || 
  'SELECT ''' || table_name || ''' AS TABLE_NAME, COUNT(*) ' ||
  ' FROM ' || table_name  as query_string 
 from all_tables 
where owner = :owner;

The output is something like

SELECT 'TAB1' AS TABLE_NAME, COUNT(*) FROM TAB1
 UNION ALL SELECT 'TAB2' AS TABLE_NAME, COUNT(*) FROM TAB2
 UNION ALL SELECT 'TAB3' AS TABLE_NAME, COUNT(*) FROM TAB3
 UNION ALL SELECT 'TAB4' AS TABLE_NAME, COUNT(*) FROM TAB4

Which you can then run to get your counts. It's just a handy script to have around sometimes.

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SELECT (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table1) + (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table2) FROM dual;

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Here is from me to share

Option 1 - counting from same domain from different table

select distinct(select count(*) from domain1.table1) "count1", (select count(*) from domain1.table2) "count2" 
from domain1.table1, domain1.table2;

Option 2 - counting from different domain for same table

select distinct(select count(*) from domain1.table1) "count1", (select count(*) from domain2.table1) "count2" 
from domain1.table1, domain2.table1;

Option 3 - counting from different domain for same table with "union all" to have rows of count

select 'domain 1'"domain", count(*) 
from domain1.table1 
union all 
select 'domain 2', count(*) 
from domain2.table1;

Enjoy the SQL, I always do :)

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select @count = sum(data) from
(
select count(*)  as data from #tempregion
union 
select count(*)  as data from #tempmetro
union
select count(*)  as data from #tempcity
union
select count(*)  as data from #tempzips
) a
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protected by casperOne Jan 11 '12 at 13:22

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