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I'm developing a Django app that will have two administration backends. One for daily use by "normal" users and the default one for more advanced tasks and for the developers.

The application uses some custom permissions but none of the default ones. So I'm currently looking for a way to remove the default permissions, or at least a way to hide them from the "daily" admin backend without large modifications.

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I've never tried it so I'm hesitant to put it down as an answer, but you can probably remove the database entries for them. If your admin users are all classified as superusers, they are assumed to have all permissions anyway (I think), and thus you shouldn't need the records. No promises, though. –  Luke Sneeringer May 19 '11 at 21:33
    
yes if they are superusers every call to a "has permission" method will return true. But I don't think that is the idea since you are using custom permissions. Do you prevent the Django admin from checking the default permissions? Because if a user doesn't have any default permissions for a certain object, it won't show up in the admin. –  Maccesch May 30 '11 at 22:25
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7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted
+50

This is a standard functionality of the auth contrib application

It handles the post_syncdb signal and creates the permissions (the standard 3: add, change, delete, plus the custom ones) for each model, they are stored into the auth_permission table on the database

So, they will be created each time you run syncdb management command

You have some choices, no one is really elegant, but you can consider:

  1. Dropping the auth contrib app and provide your authentication backend.

    Consequences -> you will lose the admin and other custom apps built on top of the auth User model, but if your application is highly customized that could be an option for you

  2. Overriding the behaviour of the post_syncdb signal inside the auth app (inside \django\contrib\auth\management__init__.py file)

    Consequences -> be aware that without the basic permissions the django admin interface won't be able to work (and maybe other things as well)

  3. Deleting the basic permissions (add, change, delete) for each model inside the auth_permission table (manually, with a script, or whatever)

    Consequences -> you will lose the admin again, and you will need to delete them each time you will run syncdb

  4. Building your own Permission application/system (with your decorators, middlewares, etc..) or extend the existing one.

    Consequences -> none, if you build it well, this is one of the cleanest solutions I think

A final consideration: changing the contrib applications or django framework itself is never considered a good thing, you could break something and you will have hard times if you will need to upgrade to a newer version of django.

So, if you want to be as clean as possibile, consider rolling your own permission system, ore extending the standard one (django-guardian is a good example of an extension to django permissions). It won't take much effort, and you can build it the way it feels right for you, overcoming the limitations of the standard django permission system. And if you do a good work, you could also consider to open source it to enable other people using/improving your solution =)

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Well, then I have to life with them. –  Martin Thurau Jun 2 '11 at 8:52
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I struggled with this same problem for a while and I think I've come up with a clean solution. Here's how you hide the permissions for Django's auth app:

from django.contrib import admin
from django.utils.translation import ugettext_lazy as _
from django import forms
from django.contrib.auth.models import Permission

class MyGroupAdminForm(forms.ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = MyGroup

    permissions = forms.ModelMultipleChoiceField(
        Permission.objects.exclude(content_type__app_label='auth'), 
        widget=admin.widgets.FilteredSelectMultiple(_('permissions'), False))


class MyGroupAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    form = MyGroupAdminForm
    search_fields = ('name',)
    ordering = ('name',)

admin.site.unregister(Group)
admin.site.register(MyGroup, MyGroupAdmin)

Of course it can easily be modified to hide whatever permissions you want. Let me know if this works for you.

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ShadowCloud gave a good rundown. Here's a simple way to accomplish your goal.

Add these line in your admin.py:

from django.contrib.auth.models import Permission
admin.site.register(Permission)

You can now add/change/delete permissions in the admin. Remove the unused ones and when you have what you want, go back and remove these two lines from admin.py.

As was mentioned by others, a subsequent syncdb will put everything back.

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If you are creating your own user management backend and only want to show your custom permissions you can filter out the default permissions by excluding permission with a name that starts with "Can".

WARNING: You must remember not to name your permissions starting with "Can"!!!! If they decide to change the naming convention this might not work.

With credit to pmdarrow this is how I did this in my project:

from django.contrib.auth.forms import UserChangeForm
from django.contrib.auth.models import Permission
from django.contrib import admin    

class UserEditForm(UserChangeForm):
    class Meta:
        model = User

        exclude = (
                   'last_login',
                   'is_superuser',
                   'is_staff',
                   'date_joined',
                   )

    user_permissions = forms.ModelMultipleChoiceField(
        Permission.objects.exclude(name__startswith='Can'), 
        widget=admin.widgets.FilteredSelectMultiple(_('permissions'), False))
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Built on top of the solution by @pmdarrow, I've come up with a relatively clean solution to patch the Django admin views.

See: https://gist.github.com/vdboor/6280390

It extends the User and Group admin to hide certain permissions.

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You can't easily delete those permissions (so that syncdb won't put them back), but you can hide them from the admin interface. The idea is, as described by others, to override the admin forms but you have to do this for both users and groups. Here is the admin.py with the solution:

from django import forms
from django.contrib import admin
from django.contrib.auth.models import Permission
from django.contrib.auth.models import User, Group
from django.contrib.auth.admin import GroupAdmin, UserAdmin
from django.contrib.auth.forms import UserChangeForm

#
# In the models listed below standard permissions "add_model", "change_model"
# and "delete_model" will be created by syncdb, but hidden from admin interface.
# This is convenient in case you use your own set of permissions so the list
# in the admin interface wont be confusing.
# Feel free to add your models here. The first element is the app name (this is
# the directory your app is in) and the second element is the name of your model
# from models.py module of your app (Note: both names must be lowercased).
#
MODELS_TO_HIDE_STD_PERMISSIONS = (
    ("myapp", "mymodel"),
)

def _get_corrected_permissions():
    perms = Permission.objects.all()
    for app_name, model_name in MODELS_TO_HIDE_STD_PERMISSIONS:
        perms = perms.exclude(content_type__app_label=app_name, codename='add_%s' % model_name)
        perms = perms.exclude(content_type__app_label=app_name, codename='change_%s' % model_name)
        perms = perms.exclude(content_type__app_label=app_name, codename='delete_%s' % model_name)
    return perms

class MyGroupAdminForm(forms.ModelForm):

    class Meta:
        model = Group

    permissions = forms.ModelMultipleChoiceField(
        _get_corrected_permissions(),
        widget=admin.widgets.FilteredSelectMultiple(('permissions'), False),
        help_text = 'Hold down "Control", or "Command" on a Mac, to select more than one.'
    )

class MyGroupAdmin(GroupAdmin):

    form = MyGroupAdminForm

class MyUserChangeForm(UserChangeForm):

    user_permissions = forms.ModelMultipleChoiceField(
        _get_corrected_permissions(),
        widget=admin.widgets.FilteredSelectMultiple(('user_permissions'), False),
        help_text = 'Hold down "Control", or "Command" on a Mac, to select more than one.'
    )

class MyUserAdmin(UserAdmin):

    form = MyUserChangeForm

admin.site.unregister(Group)
admin.site.register(Group, MyGroupAdmin)
admin.site.unregister(User)
admin.site.register(User, MyUserAdmin)
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This question was asked in '11 Nikolay. Please check the date question was posted before you post the answer. –  Prateek Oct 22 '13 at 22:09
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If you want to prevent Django from creating permissions, you can block the signals from being sent.

If you put this into a management/init.py in any app, it will bind to the signal handler before the auth framework has a chance (taking advantage of the dispatch_uid debouncing).

from django.db.models import signals

def do_nothing(*args, **kwargs):
  pass

signals.post_syncdb.connect(do_nothing, dispatch_uid="django.contrib.auth.management.create_permissions")
signals.post_syncdb.connect(do_nothing, dispatch_uid="django.contrib.auth.management.create_superuser")
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