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I'm writing some PHP code in which one object (a "Container") keeps a pointer to another object (the "Contents"). The problem is that the contents needs to access methods or properties of the container.

Here's a simplified example of what I want to do:

class Container {
    function __construct($type, $contents) {
        $this->type = $type;
        $this->contents = $contents;
    }

    function display() {
        return $this->contents->display();
    }
}

class Contents {
    function __construct($stuff) {
        $this->stuff = $stuff;
    }

    function display() {
        return 'I am ' . $this->stuff . ' in '; // how to access Container here?
    }
}

$item = new Container('a can', new Contents('Prince Albert'));
echo $item->display() . "\n";
// Displays: I am Prince Albert in 
// Wanted: I am Prince Albert in a can

What's the right way to do this?

I've tried a couple of methods that work, but they feel wrong. For example:

  • Re-defined Contents::display() to take a parameter, which doesn't seem elegant:

    function display($container) {
        return 'I am ' . $this->stuff . ' in ' . $container->type;
    }
    
  • In Contents::display(), I called debug_backtrace(true) to find out what called it, then access the object from the backtrace info. That feels kludgy/dangerous.

Is there a common solution for this kind of problem?

share|improve this question
    
Thanks to all for the responses below. You've all given me lots of things to think about. I'd like to reward all of you with a check-mark, but SO won't allow that. :) –  L S May 24 '11 at 15:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

class Container
{
    protected $type;
    protected $contents;

    function __construct($type, Contents $contents)
    {
        $this->type = $type;
        $this->contents = $contents;
        $contents->setContainer($this);
    }

    function display()
    {
        return $this->contents->display();
    }

    public function getType()
    {
        return $this->type;
    }
}

class Contents
{
    /** @var Container */
    protected $container;

    function __construct($stuff)
    {
        $this->stuff = $stuff;
    }

    public function setContainer(Container $container)
    {
        $this->container = $container;
    }

    function display()
    {
        return 'I am '.$this->stuff.' in '.$this->container->getType(); // how to access Container here?
    }
}

$item = new Container('a can', new Contents('Prince Albert'));
echo $item->display()."\n";
// Displays: I am Prince Albert in
// Wanted: I am Prince Albert in a can

And as advice: write public/protected/private for each method and variables, don't use public properties. If you don't know why, read this book: http://www.amazon.com/Objects-Patterns-Practice-Matt-Zandstra/dp/1590599098

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the advice. I'd like to know more about that, but I'd rather not order a book online and wait for it to be delivered. Do you know of any good explanations of it online? –  L S May 23 '11 at 17:57
    
I recently learned that the phpdoc comments can help Eclipse understand what object type is being returned from my class' static methods, which helps with word completion when I'm editing the code. However, I notice that adding the types of attributes and method parameters in phpdoc comments and in the method declarations themselves, doesn't help at all. For example, in your version of the Container constructor, in the body, Eclipse doesn't have any suggestions if I enter "$contents->" and press the completion key combination. Do you know why? –  L S May 23 '11 at 18:05
    
because you can't access private/protected field not from object. That's why it has been called 'private' :) More smart way is to use getters and setters. –  OZ_ May 23 '11 at 18:11
    
Oh, I see! And in the case I was trying, I expected $contents-> to expand to $contents->type with word completion. By default, type was public, but it was undeclared, so Eclipse couldn't really infer it from its usage in the class. It takes some time to get used to working with explicit types in PHP when it will often work without it. –  L S May 24 '11 at 14:58

At all there are two common solution. The one is the first one you already mention

class A {
  public function doSomething ($outer) { /* code */ }
}

where $outer is your container. Or you strictly bind the content objects to the container

class A {
  private $outer;
  public function __construct ($outer) {
    $this->outer = $outer;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I like the second solution you mentioned. –  L S May 24 '11 at 15:01

With dependency injection, you would construct the Container first (not passing in a Contents):

class Container {
    function __construct($type) {

Then, you would pass the Container to the Contents constructor:

class Contents {
    function __construct($stuff, $container) {

Since the reference is mutual, you would have to call a setter on container:

class Container {
    function setContents($contents)
share|improve this answer
    
What's the benefit of dependency injection? –  L S May 24 '11 at 15:03
    
@L S, basically, the (configurable) environment tells the object which resources to use, instead of the object finding those resources. You can consult dependency injection or other sources for more information. –  Matthew Flaschen May 24 '11 at 18:27

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