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I have the following structure :

<ul>
    <li><a>link</a>
        <ul>
            <li>
                <a>link</a>
                <ul>
                    <li><a>link</a></li>
                    <li><a>link</a></li>
                    <li><a>link</a></li>
                </ul>
            </li>
             <li>
                <a>link</a>
                 <ul>
                    <li><a>link</a></li>
                    <li><a>link</a></li>
                    <li><a>link</a></li>
                 </ul>
             </li>
        </ul>
    </li>
    <li>
        <div>content 
            <ul>
                <li><a>link</a></li>
                <li><a>link</a></li>
                <li><a>link</a></li>
            </ul>
         </div>
    </li>
    <li><a>link</a></li>
    <li><a>link</a></li>
    <li><a>link</a></li>
</ul>

I wanna select only the anchors that fall directly under the <li> tags ( children) but not the ones that fall under other tags (grandchildren) if i do

$('ul li> a')

I will also get the the ul which is nested under the div. is there a "clean" way to do this? thank you

ps: I would like to have a generic selector ( this is for a menu pluggin so I want it to ignore all the anchor tags that don't fall directly in the flow of a menu)

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1  
Can you add an id to the root ul to distinguish it from any ul? Then $('#root > li > a') won't grab that deeper ul > li > a. Or do you also want the other deep ul > li > as to be captured, just not the one under the div? –  Wiseguy May 19 '11 at 20:04
    
yeah, that is a possibility however I want to use this in a pluggin so the selector has to be less strict. –  salmane May 19 '11 at 20:07
    
So you want to grab all a elements at any depth so long as their ancestors are only ul or li? So, ul > li > a would match, and a ul > li > ul > li > ul > li > a would match too? –  Wiseguy May 19 '11 at 20:11
    
yes but in that case ul>li>div>ul>li>a would also match wouldn't it? –  salmane May 19 '11 at 20:16
1  
@wiseguy, yes exactly ...it should not match anything UNDER a div (or anything other than ul or li) –  salmane May 19 '11 at 21:03
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The Final Solution

This answer has been completely re-edited to keep it updated. The final solution is basically a selector, where starting from the original <ul> element's ID, select all anchors within the list items that doesn't break the menu structure's flow. That is, if there is an element other than <ul> or <li> nested within, don't select anything within those elements, even if there is a menu within.

The resulting selector (#root is the ID of the main <ul>) :

$('#root > li > a, #root ul:not(#root :not(ul,li) ul) > li > a')

You can try a demo over here: http://jsfiddle.net/9gPzQ/31/

However the original poster @salmane wanted to do it for a plugin, which already comes with an element passed in, so he came up with the following code to do the same as above, but within already selected objects passed as selector context:

$('li >a',this.content).not($(':not(ul,li) a',this.content))

Other interesting selectors

Along the way of finding a solution, certain interesting selectors came up due to my misunderstanding of the problem, but I'll include them here anyway just for the record, it might come in handy for some. :)

This selector selects the anchors of list items that are on the top level of a menu, wherever they are on the page:

$(':not(li) > ul > li > a')

This selector selects the anchors of list items that are on the top level of a menu, ignoring menus that are nested within other menus, even if they are nested within other containers:

$('ul:not(ul ul) > li > a')

You can try these to selector in a demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/9gPzQ/4/

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+1 Nice solution. The performance should be OK, since selection generally works right-to-left, so there's no need for an expensive * call anywhere. –  lonesomeday May 19 '11 at 20:14
    
actually that sounds close but something that would select only the ul>li>a that fall directly under an li ..your suggestion does exactly the opposite, or am i wrong? –  salmane May 19 '11 at 20:18
    
so I guess that work if I do : ('li > a').not(':not(li) > ul > li > a')...I should try... @lonesomeday i hope your assessment about performance still holds :) –  salmane May 19 '11 at 20:21
1  
It took a little fiddling around but this is what it looks like using an object : $('li >a',this.content).not($(':not(ul,li) a',this.content)) Thanks again @DarthJDG for your help :) –  salmane May 20 '11 at 0:06
1  
That's a nice solution indeed. That was fun. –  DarthJDG May 20 '11 at 7:15
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I think what you're looking for is:

$('ul:parent ul li>a')

This will give you all the li>a's without the div or anything in it.

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Thanks to the Great input of @DarthJDG

this is the solution

$('li >a',this.content).not($(':not(ul,li) a',this.content))

this.content being the object referenced by the plugging in this case the object is the parent UL

I hope this helps someone

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