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Im parsing a array of hash's with 'to_xml' from active record and im wondering if i can remove some nodes Here is the parsing code:

arrayHash.to_xml(:root => "Cenario", :skip_types => true, :skip_instruct => true)

i get a XML like that:

<Cenario>
  <Cenario nil="true"></Cenario>
  <Cenario>
    <TamanhoRegistro>
      <nomeCampo>Tamanho Registro</nomeCampo>
      <X>10</X>
      <Y>20</Y>
      <valor>10</valor>
    </TamanhoRegistro>
    <VersaoRegistro>
      <nomeCampo>Versao Registro</nomeCampo>
      <X>20</X>
      <Y>30</Y>
    </VersaoRegistro>
  </Cenario>
      .
      .
      .
      .
  <Cenario>
    <TamanhoRegistro>
      <nomeCampo>Tamanho Registro</nomeCampo>
      <X>10</X>
      <Y>20</Y>
      <valor>10</valor>
    </TamanhoRegistro>
    <VersaoRegistro>
      <nomeCampo>Versao Registro</nomeCampo>
      <X>20</X>
      <Y>30</Y>
    </VersaoRegistro>
  </Cenario>
</Cenario>

Here is the hash that populates each array slot.

hashExemplo = {
   "TamanhoRegistro" => {'nomeCampo' =>'Tamanho Registro', 'X'=> '10', 'Y'=> '20', 'valor' => '10'},
   "VersaoRegistro" =>  {'nomeCampo' =>'Versao Registro',    'X'=> '10', 'Y'=> '20', 'valor' => '10'},
id => id}

I wanted to remove the node, change the root to 'Cenarios' and each object (hash) to 'Cenario'.

Btw, sorry for the poor english. Trying my best to improve it.

Cheers.

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As an aside - and you can ignore this if you have specific reason for doing so - method and variable names in Ruby tend to be snake cased, not camel cased, so for example array_hash and hash_exemplo instead of arrayHash and hashExemplo. –  luke_randall May 21 '11 at 17:22
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2 Answers 2

Instead of array of hashs, started to use hashs of arrays. Works better, only problem is the subroot is the hash key and its kinf of annoying. but noone answerd me so... guess i will have to live with that...

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Sorry to see no one answered your question! I'll give it a try, although I'm not totally sure I follow what it is.

If I understand you correctly, you should be able to get what you want by doing the following:

arrayHash.to_xml(:root => "Cenarios", :skip_types => true, :skip_instruct => true)

Note that I changed the root to Cenarios plural. This will give you XML like this:

<Cenorios>
  <Cenorio>
    <TamanhoRegistro>
      <nomeCampo>Tamanho Registro</nomeCampo>
      <X>10</X>
      <Y>20</Y>
      <valor>10</valor>
    </TamanhoRegistro>
    <VersaoRegistro>
      <nomeCampo>Versao Registro</nomeCampo>
      <X>10</X>
      <Y>20</Y>
      <valor>10</valor>
    </VersaoRegistro>
  </Cenorio>
</Cenorios>

Or were you saying that you want TamanhoRegistro and VersaoRegistro and such to be changed to Cenario? If so, assuming your arrayHash is something like this:

arrayHash = [hashExemplo, otherHash]

you could do something like this:

arrayHash.map(&:values).flatten.to_xml(:root => "Cenorios", :skip_types => true)

which would give you XML like the following:

<Cenorios>
  <Cenorio>
    <nomeCampo>Tamanho Registro</nomeCampo>
    <X>10</X>
    <Y>20</Y>
    <valor>10</valor>
  </Cenorio>
  <Cenorio>
    <nomeCampo>Versao Registro</nomeCampo>
    <X>10</X>
    <Y>20</Y>
    <valor>10</valor>
  </Cenorio>
  <Cenorio>
    <nomeCampo>Tamanho Registro</nomeCampo>
    <X>10</X>
    <Y>20</Y>
    <valor>10</valor>
  </Cenorio>
  <Cenorio>
    <nomeCampo>Versao Registro</nomeCampo>
    <X>10</X>
    <Y>20</Y>
    <valor>10</valor>
  </Cenorio>
</Cenorios>

Essentially, #map will iterate over the array, getting an array from each hash of the values in the hash, so the array will now be an array of arrays, so #flatten flattens that into a single array.

Does that answer your question, or have I missed something?

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Thks for the replay luke, but creating array of hash's really did the trick... =) (i mistype it on my own answer) on each array slot, ruby saves a instance of the hash, so i can have one single name for the subroot ;) works flawless! –  Leonardo Galani May 23 '11 at 20:45
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