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I have a quick question - is there a best practice in SQL Table design for storing "either/or" data?

I have the following problem - I need to store template data (defining folder structure) in a SQL table. Any given folder might have a static name (for example "Emails") or it might be dynamically generated for each instance, depending on the objects associated with it (eg. Company Name).

When a business object is instantiated the template data will be used to create the actual folder structure.

I am thinking of storing the data like this:

CREATE TABLE folder
(
    ID INT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    FolderName NVARCHAR(50),
    IsDynamic BIT NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
    DynamicFieldID INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES dynamicField,
    ParentID INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES folder
)

So if the IsDynamic field is set to true I know that there will be a rule (defined on the foreign key), but if not I will use the value stored in the folder name.

However this seems a little messy for me - is there a "best-practice" pattern for this kind of scenario?

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This doesn't look too bad to me.

You may want to consider not bothering with the "IsDynamic" field as this can be derived from the fact that the DynamicFieldID is null. Then in your SQL you could LEFT JOIN and COALESCE the fields from the Dynamic tables.

But I don't think the above model is all that messy.

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CREATE TABLE folder
(
    ID INT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    ParentID INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES folder
)

CREATE TABLE dynamic_folder (
     ID INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES folder (id),
     DynamicFieldID INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES dynamicField
)

CREATE TABLE static_folder (
     ID INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES folder (id),
     FolderName NVARCHAR(50)
)
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Hi Patrick - thanks for this. I was considering this but was hung up on deciding if this was better or worse then my case. What is your opinion on why this is better (or what do you consider to be the pros & cons)? –  Chris Mar 3 '09 at 14:38
    
If you had more than two types of folders, or more than two columns were affected, this approach might come out cleaner than trying to keep everything in one table. However, as it stands, I think Chris's COALESE suggestion is more practical. I would accept his answer. :-) –  Patrick McElhaney Mar 3 '09 at 17:57
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You can just have NULL in DynamicFieldID and query like so:

SELECT COALESCE(dynamicName, folderName)
FROM folder
LEFT JOIN dynamicField ON (dynamicField.ID = folder.DynamicFieldID)
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I am not sure I am understanding the question exactly, but I think what you are saying is that you have a field that can have either a static value or one that needs to be determined at runtime based on other values.

I would create your own "variable" scheme and store that in the database. I don't know what language you are using and so I would come up with something based on that (make it different from your language) and I would use something surrounding the value - start and end. So for example:

value: /companyA/projectA/

or

value /@companyVariable@/@projectVariable@/

then just write a routine looking for opening and closing @ signs and swap those out with the appropriate values. It is a little more work, but I think it would be the easiest to understand in the end and the most flexible. Again, @ signs is just what I thought of first, use whatever characters make the most sense to you.

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Anyone care to comment on why I was voted down? Was my answer incorrect in some way? If it is a bad idea, care to mention why? –  Ryan Guill Mar 3 '09 at 16:54
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