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So long story short I have an object model in which several different entity types share a common supertype. Any type derived from this supertype has an owning User associated with it, and I want to provide a generic utility function that can return all the entities of a given type belonging to a specified User.

All of that works fine, but my function declaration looks like:

public static <T> List<T> findByUser(Class<T> entityClass, User user, EntityManager em)

...and although this is accepted by the compiler, the syntax looks a little strange to me. Is this the correct way to declare a function with a generic return type? Ideally what I'd like to have is something more like:

public static List<T> findByUser(Class<T extends MySuperClass> entityClass, User user, EntityManager em)

But the compiler doesn't like that at all. So my specific questions are:

  1. Is there any way to get rid of the seemingly spurious <T> element after static?
  2. What is the syntax that I need to use to make the compiler enforce that T must be derived from my superclass type?
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public static <T extends MySuperClass> List<T> findByUser(Class<T> entityClass, User user, EntityManager em)

should work.

The <T extends MySuperClass> is needed in the method signature (after static) as that is where the bounds of the type T are being defined.

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You want this:

public static <T extends MySuperClass> List<T> findByUser(Class<T> entityClass, User user, EntityManager em)

The "spurious" <T> (or now <T extends MySuperClass>) is the declaration of the generic type parameter(s) used in the method signatures (return and parameter types).

Basically, the signature now says "calling this method always involves a class T that extends MySuperClass, and the first parameter must be a Class object that represents T, and the return type will be a List<T>.

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the <T> after static tells the compiler that the function should be generic and allows you to set the constraints in it.

public static <T extends MySuperClass> List<T> findByUser(Class<T> entityClass, User user, EntityManager em)
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