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I am implementing a very basic thread in C#:

private Thread listenThread;

public void startParser()
{
   this.listenThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(checkingData));
   this.listenThread.IsBackground = true;
   this.listenThread.Start();
}

private void checkingData()
{
   while (true)
   {

   }

}

Then I immediately get 100% CPU. I want to check if sensor data is read inside the while(true) loop. Why it is like this?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Can we assume there is actually some implementation in the while loop, and that it has some ability to terminate? – Yuck May 20 '11 at 0:12
1  
Getting 100% CPU is correct according to this code. Is there any interval you want to check sensor data? Probably you may have to sleep the thread accordingly. – CharithJ May 20 '11 at 0:14
up vote 10 down vote accepted

while (true) is what killing your CPU.

You can add Thread.Sleep(X) to you while to give CPU some rest before checking again.

Also, seems like you actually need a Timer.

Look at one of the Timer classes here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.timer.aspx.

Use Timer with as high pulling interval as you can afford, 1 sec, half a sec.
You need to tradeoff between CPU usage and the maximum delay you can afford between checks.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi. thanks. But then how can I wait for data coming? I would like to continuously checking the data coming. – olidev May 20 '11 at 0:13
1  
How often do you need to be checking realistically? Even letting it sleep for 10ms will make a huge difference. – g.foley May 20 '11 at 0:16
    
@JoesyXHN - where are your data coming from? – Alex Aza May 20 '11 at 0:16

Let your loop sleep. It's running around and around and getting tired. At the very least, let it take a break eventually.

share|improve this answer
    
should I use: timer.tick per 1 millisecond instead of using thread with while loop and sleep for 1 millisecond? – olidev May 20 '11 at 0:14
    
BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! 1 millisecond! try 100-500 milliseconds. – William Mioch May 20 '11 at 0:29

Because your function isn't doing anything inside the while block, it grabs the CPU, and, for all practical purposes, never lets go of it, so other threads can do their work

private void checkingData()
{
    while (true)
    {
        // executes, immediately
    }
}

If you change it to the following, you should see more reasonable CPU consumption:

private void checkingData()
{
    while (true)
    {
        // read your sensor data 

        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please don't make trivial edits just to bump your posts. Editing is encouraged, but please make actual improvements. Thanks! – Michael Myers Jul 13 '11 at 22:27

you can use blocking queue. take a item from blocking queue will block the thread until there is a item put into the queue. that doesn't cost any cpu.

with .net4, you can use BlockingCollection http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267312.aspx

under version 4, there is not blocking queue int .net framework.

you can find many implements of blocking queue if you google it.

here is a implementation

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/boundedblockingqueue.aspx

by the way. where does the data you wait come from?

EDIT

if you want to check file. you can use FileSystemWatcher to check it with thread block.

if your data comes from external API and the api doesn't block the thread, there is no way to block the thread except use Thread.Sleep

share|improve this answer
    
how blocking collection will help if JoesyXHN needs to check a file or external API or something else? – Alex Aza May 20 '11 at 0:30
    
you are right. if he want to watch a file or the data comes from external API. blocking collection is useless. – Terry Ma May 20 '11 at 0:44
    
so i asked him where the data comes from. – Terry Ma May 20 '11 at 0:45

If you're polling for a condition, definitely do as others suggested and put in a sleep. I'd also add that if you need maximum performance, you can use a statistical trick to avoid sleeping when sensor data has been read. When you detect sensor data is idle, say, 10 times in a row, then start to sleep on each iteration again.

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