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I would appreciate your help:

This is not a full/correct MYSQL query only pseudocode:

Select *
 from Notifications as n
 where n.date > (CurrentDate-10 days)
 limit by 1
 FOR UPDATE

My Question:

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/select.html states: If you use FOR UPDATE with a storage engine that uses page or row locks, rows examined by the query are write-locked until the end of the current transaction

=> Is here only the ONE Record RETURNED locked by mySQL or all Records it has to SCAN TO FIND the SINGLE RECORD?

Thanks! Markus

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Locking all Records it has to SCAN TO FIND the SINGLE RECORD would be so terribly stupid, that I really REALLY doubt MySQL works like this. Think about algorithm in the MySQL search engine - when it sees some row and knows it's not the row you need, why on Earth would it spend extra time to set the lock?! I suggest you to un-accept answer, so that other MySQL people could comment on this –  Alexander Malakhov May 20 '11 at 5:36
    
Also, being Oracle DB developer I assure you that Oracle locks only rows which satisfy WHERE condition. Hence it's technically possible and I don't think MySQL that much inferior –  Alexander Malakhov May 20 '11 at 5:39
1  
While it looks like my answer ended up being correct, I suggest that you select the other answer instead as it is correct and has actually tested it, while mine just refers to the documentation which, as Alexander points out, could be read in more than one way. –  El Yobo May 20 '11 at 12:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Why don't we just try it?

Set up the database

CREATE DATABASE so1;
USE so1;
CREATE TABLE notification (`id` BIGINT(20), `date` DATE, `text` TEXT) ENGINE=InnoDB;
INSERT INTO notification(id, `date`, `text`) values (1, '2011-05-01', 'Notification 1');
INSERT INTO notification(id, `date`, `text`) values (2, '2011-05-02', 'Notification 2');
INSERT INTO notification(id, `date`, `text`) values (3, '2011-05-03', 'Notification 3');
INSERT INTO notification(id, `date`, `text`) values (4, '2011-05-04', 'Notification 4');
INSERT INTO notification(id, `date`, `text`) values (5, '2011-05-05', 'Notification 5');

Now, start two database connections

Connection 1

BEGIN;
SELECT * FROM notification WHERE `date` >= '2011-05-03' FOR UPDATE;

Connection 2

BEGIN;

If MySQL locks all rows, the following statement would block. If it only locks the rows it returns, it shouldn't block.

SELECT * FROM notification WHERE `date` = '2011-05-02' FOR UPDATE;

And indeed it does block.

Interestingly, we also cannot add records that would be read, i.e.

INSERT INTO notification(id, `date`, `text`) values (6, '2011-05-06', 'Notification 6');

blocks as well!

I can't be sure at this point whether MySQL just goes ahead and locks the entire table when a certain percentage of rows are locked, or where it's actually really intelligent in making sure the result of the SELECT ... FOR UPDATE query can never be changed by another transaction (with an INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE) while the lock is being held.

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+1 for proof by example. This behavior looks terrifying. Have you tried to lock just 1 row? Why don't you select by id column, I don't trust date literals :). What's the version of MySQL/InnoDB ? –  Alexander Malakhov May 20 '11 at 7:50
    
+1 definitely, this is a much better answer than mine. –  El Yobo May 20 '11 at 12:42
6  
+1. the whole table is not blocked if a lock is taken on a unique column. i tried CREATE TABLE notification (id` BIGINT(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, date DATE, text TEXT, PRIMARY KEY (id)) ENGINE=InnoDB;` which works. But it does not work if unique/primary key is not specified ie. SELECT * FROM notification WHERE id` = '1' FOR UPDATE;` on the original schema –  deepak Jul 12 '12 at 9:23
    
Good answer and went right to the heart of something I'm seeing. That is I get the locking semantics I want/expect when the WHERE clause is id=x but not when it's name='foo'. But I'd love to see this explained officially in MySQL docs and I don't feel like El Yobo's link is quite that... –  Chris Markle Feb 14 '13 at 1:33
    
This example was very instructive for me. Attempting to select individual records for update by their ID resulted in blocking, until I made the ID field a primary key. Then, everything worked fine. The important lesson is to only use FOR UPDATE if you are using a unique key, otherwise your entire table may as well be locked since it'll scan the entire table/index to find all matches, therefore locking everything. –  fabspro Dec 5 '13 at 11:51

Following links from the documentation page you posted gives more information about locking. In this page

A SELECT ... FOR UPDATE reads the latest available data, setting exclusive locks on each row it reads. Thus, it sets the same locks a searched SQL UPDATE would set on the rows.

This seems pretty clear that it is all rows that it has to scan.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if I understood you correctly, but are you saying, that if I'm selecting last row and columns in WHERE aren't indexed, it will lock the whole table ? This is obviously wrong. At least Oracle locks only selected rows –  Alexander Malakhov May 20 '11 at 4:15
    
Oracle is much better than MySQL :) I don't know through experimentation, only through reading the documentation, but that is what it seems to say. It does sounds rather stupid though. –  El Yobo May 20 '11 at 4:22
    
It sounds enormously stupid. Given popularity of MySQL, I really doubt it's the way it works. And statement setting exclusive locks on each row it reads can be interpreted other way. Though I agree it's not 100% clear –  Alexander Malakhov May 20 '11 at 5:29
    
I don't know; MySQL does some pretty incredibly stupid things :-/ I generally just BEGIN, do whatever I need to do and COMMIT, but have no idea what it's doing internally when I do that. –  El Yobo May 20 '11 at 5:57
    
@ Alexander Malakhov - That does seem to be the way it works, I just tested it and found it locks the whole table unless you index the columns in your where clause. The documentation should really be improved here, as it's extremely confusing. "Each row it reads" would make me think that the rows it "reads" would be based on the conditions in my WHERE clause. So if my WHERE clause constrained the result to 1 returned row, that is the row I would expect to be locked. But it seems "each row it reads" means each row "scanned by the database". –  dcp Jan 8 '14 at 21:31

I know this question is pretty old, but I've wanted to share the results of some relevant testing I've done with indexed columns which has yielded some pretty strange results.

Table structure:

CREATE TABLE `t1` (                       
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,                 
  `notid` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,                         
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)                                    
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

12 rows inserted with INSERT INTO t1 (notid) VALUES (1), (2),..., (12). On connection 1:

BEGIN;    
SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id=5 FOR UPDATE;

On connection 2, the following statements are blocked:

SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id!=5 FOR UPDATE;
SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id<5 FOR UPDATE;
SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE notid!=5 FOR UPDATE;
SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE notid<5 FOR UPDATE;
SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id<=4 FOR UPDATE;

The strangest part is that SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id>5 FOR UPDATE; is not blocked, nor are any of

...
SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id=3 FOR UPDATE;
SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id=4 FOR UPDATE;
SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id=6 FOR UPDATE;
SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id=7 FOR UPDATE;
...

I'd also like to point out that it seems the entire table is locked when the WHERE condition in the query from connection 1 matches a non-indexed row. For example, when connection 1 executes SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE notid=5 FOR UPDATE, all select queries with FOR UPDATE and UPDATE queries from connection 2 are blocked.

-EDIT-

This is a rather specific situation, but it was the only I could find that exhibits this behaviour:

Connection 1:

BEGIN;
SELECT *, @x:=@x+id AS counter FROM t1 CROSS JOIN (SELECT @x:=0) b HAVING counter>5 LIMIT 1 FOR UPDATE;
+----+-------+-------+---------+
| id | notid | @x:=0 | counter |
+----+-------+-------+---------+
|  3 |     3 |     0 |       9 |
+----+-------+-------+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

From connection 2:

SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id=2 FOR UPDATE; is blocked;

SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE id=4 FOR UPDATE; is not blocked.

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