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I have this code that is captured in the jquery Data object from a php page.

echo "
    var $d = $('<div/>', {
        id: 'hi' + $('#textResp').children().length,
        class: 'eventdiv',
        html: 'hello'
    }).hide().fadeIn(3000);

    $('#textResp').append($d)

";

Problem is, the 's are not escaped. I have tried using /' to escape, but it comes up with an error. I am sure I am doing this wrong, does anyone know where to put the /' instead of '?

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4  
Wait, why would it error at all? You've got ' inside of ", it shouldn't do anything... –  Cyclone May 20 '11 at 0:35
2  
Horrible things are probably happening because PHP is interpolating all those $ signs as PHP variables, which would completely screw up your output. Echo using single quotes. The easiest and safest way to put PHP variables in there is to use json_encode, in my experience. –  El Yobo May 20 '11 at 0:38
    
Why nobody suggests ?> whatever <?? –  Leonid Sep 9 '11 at 8:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use a php nowdoc instead of quotes at all which would simplify things:

echo <<<'DOC'
    var $d = $('<div/>', {
        id: 'hi' + $('#textResp').children().length,
        class: 'eventdiv',
        html: 'hello'
    }).hide().fadeIn(3000);

    $('#textResp').append($d)
DOC;

then use whatever you want inside (quote or dquote). This is, of course, unparsed so if $d was actually referring to a php var then you would have problems.

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1  
NOWDOCs are such an underused PHP feature –  JohnD May 20 '11 at 1:40

Your apostrophes actually look fine. But, within a double quoted string, PHP will evaluate any string beginning with a dollar sign as a variable and not produce the desired result. Try replace the jquery related instances of $ with \$. Like this:

echo "
    var \$d = \$('<div/>', {
        id: 'hi' + \$('#textResp').children().length,
        class: 'eventdiv',
        html: 'hello'
    }).hide().fadeIn(3000);

    \$('#textResp').append(\$d)

";
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2nd line: var $d = Looks like it's a jQuery var :P –  drudge May 20 '11 at 0:42
    
@jnpcl: How can you be sure about that? –  Asaph May 20 '11 at 0:43
    
@Asaph: The context of the code. It makes no sense if you assume $d to be a PHP variable. –  drudge May 20 '11 at 0:44
2  
@Asaph: When using jQuery, naming a variable this way ($d) allows you to use jQuery functions on that variable a little easier: $d.func() rather than $(d).func(). That seems to me like a MUCH more likely situation than having $d be a PHP variable used to dynamically name a javascript variable. –  drudge May 20 '11 at 0:50
1  
@jnpcl $d is a valid JS identifier for the variable/property named ... $d (it could very well be var d = ...). There is no "jQuery magic" and it does not implicitly mean $(d) (which evaluates d and uses it as an argument to the application of the function-object which [hopefully] results from the evaluation of $). However, the $var convention is discouraged in JavaScript and likely comes from using sigils in PHP/Perl. I do agree, however, that -- hopefully -- $d was not meant to be a PHP variable as that sort of "dynamic" code just sounds like a mess ;-) –  user166390 May 20 '11 at 2:01

use json_encode function in php, it behaves like the escape_javascript function in rails.

just pass a string argument to the json_encode function, and it return the escaped string for you, see the sample code below:

<?php
$form_html  = <<HTML
<form action='...' ...>
    <input type='...' name='...' ...>
    ...
</html>
HTML;
?>

var form_html = <?php echo json_encode($form_html); ?>;
$('.remote#create_form').html(form_html).slideDown();
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You will need to use \ before all 's.

However, this is puzzling, why do you feel you need escape characters? It appears you are simply echoing this output, if this is between <script /> tags, you should be fine.

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I am confused. Why is this? –  user166390 May 20 '11 at 0:37
    
Well it isn't, that's why I said in the second paragraph it shouldn't be needed. But I was expressing to him that he had the escape character wrong and that it should be \. I don't feel this is worth a down vote, considering I was the first to respond he should be using \ in some capacity. –  GONeale May 20 '11 at 0:49
    
Yes, but that came later. I didn't downvote, btw. and gave an offset ;-) –  user166390 May 20 '11 at 1:56

PHP will attempt to expand variables, $name, that occur in strings wrapped in double quotes. Since $d looks like a variable to the PHP interpreter, it will try to replace it with the variable's value.

Assuming that you don't have $d defined anywhere, that will produce an empty space and, possibly, a notice (if you are using error level E_NOTICE).

To prevent that from happening, escape dollar signs with a backslash (replace $ with \$)

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Use single quotes for your string construction. Only use double quotes when you specifically are including variables that you want evaluated. PHP is trying to evaluate all of those $ references you have in there. By using single quotes, you will avoid many escaping problems.

echo '
    var $d = $("<div/>", {
        id: "hi" + $("#textResp").children().length,
        class: "eventdiv",
        html: "hello"
    }).hide().fadeIn(3000);

    $("#textResp").append($d)

';
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