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Is there any good reason why ASP.NET's session state cookie and the Forms Authentication cookie are two separate cookies? What if I want to "tie" them to each other? Is it possible in an elegant way?

Right now, I am stuck with the following solution, which works, but is still ugly:

[Authorize]
public ActionResult SomeAction(SomeModel model)
{
    // The following four lines must be included in *every* controller action
    // that requires the user to be authenticated, defeating the purpose of
    // having the Authorize attribute.
    if (SomeStaticClass.WasSessionStateLost/*?*/) {
        FormsAuthentication.SignOut();
        return RedirectToAction("Login", "Account");
    }

    // ...
}

@RPM1984: This is what happens:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Login(LoginModel loginModel)
{
    if (/* user ok */)
    {
        // ...
        Session["UserID"] = loginModel.UserID;
        Session["Password"] = loginModel.Password;
        // ...
    }
    else
    {
        return View();
    }
}

And it doesn't take much guessing to know what WasSessionStateLost does.

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1  
"tie" them together would be like storing Customer information with Product information... The two things are completely separate, Session and Authentication have nothing in common, and they have two separate timeouts, tyeing them together isn't logical or practical. –  Phill May 20 '11 at 1:27
    
@Phill: Actually, my problem is that the set of users of my application is equal to the set of users of its back-end database. (In my defense: That design decision was taken long ago, when I wasn't even an employee of this company!) So I need to preserve the username and password (which will be entered by users only once: when they log in) between HTTP requests, or I will not be able to make further requests to the database... –  Eduardo León May 20 '11 at 1:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'll start with a solution, then an explanation followed by a recommendation.

Create a custom authorization attribute:

Since your application defines Authorized as follows:

  • Logged in
  • Must have values in Session["UserID"] and Session["Password"]

you need to define your own AuthorizationAttribute

    public class AuthorizedWithSessionAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
    {    
        protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
        {
            if(httpContext.Request.IsAuthenticated && 
                Session["UserID"] != null && Session["Password"] != null)
                return true;

            // sign them out so they can log back in with the Password
            if(httpContext.Request.IsAuthenticated)
                FormsAuthentication.SignOut(); 

            return false;
        }
    }

Replace all your [Authorize] attributes with [AuthorizedWithSession] and you shouldn't need to put session check code in your controllers.

I don't know enough about your application, but saving passwords in session (even worse in plain text) is not a secure thing to do.

In addition, as RPM1984 said, the session cookie and authentication cookie are separate.

Explanation:

Think of the session as a bucket of info (on the server side) with your name on it. ASP.NET can take and put stuff in that bucket. ASP.NET gives you a name, your session id, and puts it on the bucket so it can know which one is yours.

The authentication cookie tells ASP.NET that you're authenticated and stores your authentication name in it. The authentication name is usually set by the developer of the application and is usually a unique key (think primary key in a DB) to separate you from the other users.

Recommendation to be more secure:

Encrypt the passwords before your store them. This is not total security, but it beats storing passwords in plain text and of course, if someone were to get a hold of the encryption key, they can crack the passwords.

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1  
Never ever encrypt user's passwords. Hash them, and compare hashes. The only time you should be encrypting passwords is when a system needs them to authenticate to another system. –  blowdart May 20 '11 at 2:23
2  
@blowdart which is the case in the OPs situation. –  Kyle Trauberman May 20 '11 at 2:48
    
Except in that case it's still a bad idea, sure, cache them, as he's doing in session, but storing them is asking for more trouble than it's worth frankly. –  blowdart May 20 '11 at 2:50
2  
@blowdart I'm not disagreeing, just pointing out that the OP is using the credentials to connect to SQL. see my comment on @RPM's answer. –  Kyle Trauberman May 20 '11 at 2:53
    
@blowdart - you should take a look at the OP's situation. He has to store them. It seems everyone is warning him of how bad his system is; I think he knows that, but he can't change it. –  Omar May 20 '11 at 3:03

Session != Authentication

The session state cookie tracks the user's activity during a browser session.

The forms authentication cookie tracks the user's authenticated activity during a given time period, specified by the expiration date of the ticket and whether or not you have created a persistent cookie (e.g "Remember Me" checkbox).

You shouldn't be touching the session cookie itself, and all it contains is an identifier to tie the client session (browser) to the server.

If you need to access the session, use HttpContext.Current.Session.

What exactly are you trying to "tie" together?

What does SomeStaticClass.WasSessionStateLost do?

share|improve this answer
    
@Eduardo - well then you might need to reword the question and provide more detail as to what your trying to achieve. Because that code you have provided is scary. –  RPM1984 May 20 '11 at 1:34
    
@RPM1984: I do understand the difference between Session and Authentication. Actually, my problem is that the set of users of my application is equal to the set of users of its back-end database. (In my defense: That design decision was taken long ago, when I wasn't even an employee of this company!) So I need to preserve the username and password (which will be entered by users only once: when they log in) between HTTP requests, or I will not be able to make further requests to the database... –  Eduardo León May 20 '11 at 1:35
    
@RPM1984: I know it's scary. But, what can I do? Redesigning the database is not an option, as I don't even have any control over the database. –  Eduardo León May 20 '11 at 1:37
    
@Eduardo - well the username should already be in the forms auth ticket and hence in the User.Identity.Name property. So can't you fetch the user from the DB based on that? If you need the UserId, then stick that in the forms auth ticket. –  RPM1984 May 20 '11 at 1:38
1  
@Eduardo it seems to me that you'd be better off going through the effort to re-factor the application to use one user for the database than going down the path you're currently on. What was the reasoning behind having each user have a separate login on SQL? Why not use windows authentication if its that important? –  Kyle Trauberman May 20 '11 at 1:49

Rather than using session, which is short lived you could cache in the System.Web.Cache. With this you can add events that are called before an entry is removed and decide accordingly if the cache should be cleared. You can set a higher time-out value on that, with the added bonus that you're not storing the clear text password in a file or database anywhere. Another bonus is you won't be vulnerable to session hijacking.

Of course if the application pool recycles the cache is gone, and as it's in memory load balanced machines will be out of sync, but Velocity or another distributed, out of process cache system would solve that.

It's not perfect though, entries may be dumped due to pressure on the cache, and of course you know this is all a bad idea anyway, so I'll skip that lecture.

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