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I am attempting to learn C++ (currently only know PHP and some C#) and have run into my first issue.

I am trying to call a class inside a switch, then use that defined variable after the switch. However, I get the error described in the title.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class Hero {
protected:
    int hHealth,hStamina,hExp;
    string hName;
public:
    void Create(string);
    string GetName() {
        return this->hName;
    }
};

class Wizard:public Hero {
public:
    void SetStats(string hName) {
        this->hName = hName;

        this->hHealth = 40;
        this->hStamina = 80;
    }

};

int main() {
    string hName;
    int hClass;


    cout << "Welcome to Ryan's Dungeons & Dragons Adventure!\n\n";
    cout << "Enter your Heroes name\n";
    cout << "Name: ";
    cin >> hName;

    cout << hName << ", please select your class\n";
    cout << "(1) The Wizard\n";
    cout << "(2) The Warrior\n";
    cout << "(3) The Rogue\n";
    cout << "(4) The Priest\n";

    cout << "Class: ";
    cin >> hClass;

    switch (hClass) {
    case 1:
        Wizard _hero;
        break;
    }

    cout << _hero->GetName();


    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

The error in question occurs on the line:

cout << _hero->getName();

where it says _hero is undefind.

share|improve this question
1  
What you want is a factory that returns a smart pointer of your "CharacterClass"/Hero base class. When given 1 (or whatever you use to indicate "Wizard"), the factory returns an instance of the Wizard class. And give this base class a virtual destructor. – Fred Nurk May 20 '11 at 2:29
    
It would be really cool if C++ allowed that... Would save so much headache ... Sometimes, the strict type safity of C++ is a pain. :P – Xeo May 20 '11 at 2:37
up vote 4 down vote accepted

_hero is defined only within the scope of that switch statement. You need to create objects in the same or higher up scope that you'll be using them.

One way you can get around this is define a pointer to Hero before the switch (initializing to null) and then set it to a value inside the switch. For instance:

Wizard *_hero = NULL;
switch (hClass) {
    case 1:
        _hero = new Wizard();
        break;
    }
}

if (_hero) {
    cout << _hero->GetName();
}

You're also using the -> on a class value (as opposed to a pointer to one). Scope issues aside, you probably intended to write _hero.GetName(). Inside your class, -> is right however since this is a pointer to your object.

share|improve this answer
    
Why must this be a pointer? – user166390 May 20 '11 at 2:30
    
+1 for nicely solving the scoping problem. – Eric Pi May 20 '11 at 2:30
    
Because you need to create a reference to the class before creating the actual class inside a different scope. You can only achieve this with a pointer. (References must be initialized and can't be changed) – yan May 20 '11 at 2:31
    
yan, thank you! that got rid of the error. I switched it to _hero.GetName and it gave me an "Error: expression must have class type" on _hero, so I kept it at ->, is that acceptable or should I look into the cause of the error when using .? – Morgan May 20 '11 at 2:39
    
That's acceptable on the solution I provided, since I'm using a pointer type, not a value type. – yan May 20 '11 at 2:49
switch (hClass) {
    case 1:
        Wizard _hero;
        break;
} // <-- _hero is deallocated at this point

cout << _hero->GetName();

The scope of _hero is limited to the switch statement.

share|improve this answer
5  
You mean to the switch statement. – Xeo May 20 '11 at 2:27
    
Is there a way to accomplish what I am trying to, or should I try a different method? – Morgan May 20 '11 at 2:28
    
@Xeo - Yes, you are correct. In case of switch case fall-through, it should be able to be used. How ever, think of situation where case 2 is a match and instance is being used in it. – Mahesh May 20 '11 at 2:30

I don't think that even works in C#... what you want is a pointer that's going to be initialized in the switch statement:

Hero* _hero = 0;

switch(hClass){
  case 1: _hero = new Wizard;
  break;
}

// use _hero ...

// at the end, delete it
delete _hero;

Though, you now most likely need a virtual destructor and virtual functions. Read up on them, they're a powerful OO feature. But you probably know about them from C#.

share|improve this answer

You said you know some C# and php, which I do not. I just want to know how would this have behaved in C#.

Creating an object inside some scope and using it outside the scope. Like: {int a;} a = 0;

In C++ its an issue.

    switch (hClass) {
    case 1:
        Wizard _hero;
        break;
    }
//At this no _hero is present. _hero is out of its scope
share|improve this answer

The _hero object is restricted to the scope of that switch block. What you want is probably this:

Hero* _hero;

switch (hClass) {
case 1:
    _hero = new Wizard();
    break;
}

cout << _hero->GetName();
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot the asterisk on the pointer. – Xeo May 20 '11 at 2:33
    
@Xeo: Thank-you, fixed! – Ryan O'Hara May 20 '11 at 2:35
    
When I tried this, the error disappears however when I try to debug it, I get an error about unresolved externals – Morgan May 20 '11 at 2:50
    
@Morgan: Well, I have no idea what that means. Did you type in "1" as input (just making sure)? – Ryan O'Hara May 20 '11 at 2:51
    
Doesn't even get to that point. Hit F5 to debug and it stops with that error. Will check Google and see if I find anything – Morgan May 20 '11 at 2:53

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