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I have this table where I can generate dynamic rows (which has input <type="text" /> as content) through jquery's .append() and I'm storing the generated html into a <input type="hidden" /> by getting the html through jquery's .html() and adding the value to the hidden with .val().

In Internet Explorer, if I enter values into the textboxes the values are also included in the hidden field, but in Firefox everything except the values are stored in the field.

Edit:

So, my question is: What method should I use to get the values to show even in Firefox?

Edit:

Here are more details on my question:

The table is constructed as such:

<table id="tblTest" class="testTable">
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <td>Product</td>
            <td>Quantity</td>
            <td>Remove TR</td>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody id="tblTestTR">
    </tbody>
    <tfoot>
        <tr>
            <td></td>
            <td></td>
            <td></td>
        </tr>
    </tfoot>
</table>
<input type="button" id="btnTest" value="Add Table Row" />&nbsp;<input type="submit" id="btnSubmit" value="Submit Form" />
<input type="hidden" id="txtHTML" name="txtHTML" />

With the function to add the table row being:

function AddTR()
        {
            var txtBox = "<tr id='dynTR'><td><input type='text' class='textBoxes' value='' /></td><td><input type='text' class='textBoxes' value='0' /></td><td><input type='button' value='remove' /></td></tr>";
            x++;
            var oRow = $(txtBox);
            $(this).append(oRow);

            oRow.find("input[type=\"button\"]").click(function ()
            {
                $(this).closest("tr").remove();
            });
        }

And to get the HTML of the <tbody> being:

function GetInnerHTML(node)
        {
            alert(node.html());
            $("#txtHTML").val(node.html());
        }
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2  
Should you not be using val() instead of html()? –  daryl May 20 '11 at 3:41
2  
Can you please provide an example? –  Ryan Olds May 20 '11 at 3:43
    
@tfbox - sorry, added that detail to the question. I did notice it read like I was adding the value to the hidden by using .html() and not .val(); –  Erick Garcia May 20 '11 at 3:44
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The proper way to read values of input elements is by reading their actual values, not the markup that renders them. You cannot assume that a browser will change the markup to store the values of input elements.

The fact that IE seems to be doing that is really bad. Always keep in mind that IE is notorious (even with IE9) for breaking standards.

A similar case where IE stores state by manipulating the original markup: Reading the href attribute of a relative link will give you the resolved absolute URL. Just to give you an idea about how abundant these quirks are...

Don't base your algorithm on browser quirks, but seek out the proper way. Try the val() method that jQuery provides.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I'm not trying to read the values of the input fields. I really just need to save the html with the values just for the user. –  Erick Garcia May 20 '11 at 5:16
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firebug does not always update changes made by jquery. if you console.log the values you'll see it's there.

by the way - are you familiar with jqgrid?

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I've seen it, but I haven't used it yet. I think jqgrid might be too big for what I'm trying to achieve though. Any thoughts on my comment? –  Erick Garcia May 20 '11 at 5:06
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I can't say what you're doing it's really not clear from your code, try this

<table>
<tbody>
</tbody>
</table>
<form>
<input type="text" name="textI" />
<input type="submit" />
</form>

$("form").submit(function( ev ){
  var val = $( this ).find("[name=textI]").val(); 
  $('tbody').append('<tr><td>' + val + '<button>Remove</button></td></tr>');

});

$('table').delegate('button','click',function(){
  $( this ).parent().remove(); //parent targets td, perhaps need to use parent().parent()
});
share|improve this answer
    
The .closest("<tr>") is just the same as using parent() or parent().parent() since I just need to remove the <tr> from table. And I'm not asking about how to remove the <tr> –  Erick Garcia May 20 '11 at 5:19
    
Yes closest() will look up the ancestry for the first hit. The performance of this is not disclosed, but you can safely use this instead of looking up parents directly. –  Drew May 20 '11 at 5:37
    
I see... Thanks for the tip. Sorry if my last comment sounds obnoxious or something. -.-' –  Erick Garcia May 20 '11 at 5:47
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