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I was looking at some other question and then I had this question:

  1. Who calls the Main() method?
  2. If I want to exit/quit the application (when I get some exception in the Main() method itself), is it a good idea to use return; statement from the catch block in the Main() method?

    • Please note that I am not starting any thread in the Main() method explicitly. When we start the application, are there any threads start automatically in the background?
    • Application.Exit() does not guarantee an application to quit
    • (EDITED point) Environment.Exit() is another option.

Can use of return; statement to quit the application be a good idea? If no, what are those (subtle) things because of which it may not be good idea?

In comparison, which is the best approach to quit?

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your application is going to terminate due to an unexpected error, you may wish to use Environment.FailFast which will "crash" the application with a specified message that gets written to the event log and offers the user an opportunity to submit the crash data to Microsoft. As the developer, Microsoft can make the crash data available to you.

But if you just want to return an error condition to the calling process (such as in the case of a console application) you can modify your Main method signature to return an int and then return a non-zero value which by convention implies an error condition.

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Wow 10 years of c# and I did not know you could change the method signature –  Charles Lambert May 20 '11 at 4:37
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Who calls the Main() method?

CLR

If I want to exit/quit the application (when I get some exception in the Main() method itself), is it a good idea to use return; statement from the catch block in the Main() method?

Yes, with the caveat that you don't have other foreground threads.

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Thanks for your reply. I was editing the question when you posted answer, I think. Btw, When we start the application, are there any threads start automatically in the background/forground? –  CSharpLearner May 20 '11 at 4:18
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You could put a giant try/catch block around all of Main(), or set up the AppDomain.UnhandledException event. This is not directly relevant, but look at Environment.Exit, you're right about Application.Exit since all it does is close all windows. Environment.Exit also allows you to specify a value other than 0 as the exit status (errorlevel) if you have declared void Main() instead of int Main().

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Application.Exit() is for Form based applications. The best way to handle an exception in Main:

static void Main(string[] args) {
    try {
        // code here
    } catch {
        // do any clean up and return

        // optionally specify an exit code
        Environment.Exit(1 /* or any number other than zero since this is an error condition */);
    }
}
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yay! a downvote without any explination on why. very helpful. –  Charles Lambert May 20 '11 at 4:26
    
Better if provide reason for downvoting this ! –  CSharpLearner May 20 '11 at 4:30
    
Yeah drive by downvote is not cool unless there's an obvious problem with the answer. I had to issue a balancing upvote. –  Josh May 20 '11 at 4:32
    
@Josh - thank you –  Charles Lambert May 20 '11 at 4:34
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1) The OS basically calls the Main method. It start address is specified PE header of the .exe (if I remember correctly).

2) Yes use the return statement from the catch block.

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But in .NET it's more complicated since the assembly must be JIT'ed first. The CLR actually calls the Main method. –  Josh May 25 '11 at 0:52
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