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Writing a small HTML web page with some very simple Javascript in it, I noticed that after it was done, it kept the circle spinning (firefox). I've seen that many times on other pages and always thought that it was a Javascript error or loop problem, but this program I was running was definitely done.

Here is one example of a small web page that does this. After you click the button and it processes, the throbber (thanks for Kooilinc for the term) keeps on going.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8" />
    <title>Grade Tester</title>
    <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">       
      function calculate()
      {
       var grade = document.getElementById("grade").value.toUpperCase();        
        switch (grade)
        {
         case "A":
           document.write("Outstanding Achievement");
           break;

         case "B":
           document.write("Above Average");
           break;

         case "C":
           document.write("Average Achievement");
           break;

          case "D":
            document.write("Low Passing Grade");
           break;

         case "F":
           document.write("Failing Grade");
            break;
        }
      }
    </script>       
    </head>
  <body>
    Grade:<input type="text" id="grade" />
    <br /><input type="button" value="Get Result" onclick="calculate()" />
  </body>
</html>

I was able to stop it by hitting stop (right-click and stop).

What do I have to do to get Javascript to stop processing (or the browser to stop processing) after the script is done?

Note1: This occurred in FF4.01, not in IE or Chrome (for this code sample).

Note2: I tried the window.stop() function after the switch statement, and it didn't stop the throbber.

As per Lekensteyn's answer, document.close() after the switch statement solved this one, but here's an example that didn't throb at all and doesn't use document.close().

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8" />
    <title>Lab 9.1</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">
      var phrase = "Every good boy does fine goes on the line."
      document.write(phrase.length + "<br />");
      for(var i = 0; i < phrase.length; i++)
      {
        document.write(phrase.charCodeAt(i) + " ");
      }
        document.write("<br />");
        document.write(phrase.toLowerCase() + "<br />");
        document.write(phrase.toUpperCase() + "<br />");
    </script>
  </body>
</html>
share|improve this question
3  
Show you script please. –  Dr.Molle May 20 '11 at 5:57
    
@Dr.Molle, that's why I was so specific in the question about how simple it was, so that people could logically assume the minimal javascript, and just answer the question. I'm not at the computer with the code, and can't give the example, which doesn't matter anyway. Even the teacher of the class said it was a common thing for the browser to keep running after the javascript was done, but he didn't know how to stop it either. –  Lance Roberts May 20 '11 at 6:02
5  
Your question is not specific, you ask for a crystal ball so far. Most the described behaviour appears if you use the method document.open() without closing the opened document at the end, but that could only be a guess without knowing any details. –  Dr.Molle May 20 '11 at 6:05
1  
There is a function window.stop() see it here java2s.com/Tutorial/JavaScript/0380__Window/windowstop.htm. But not sure where it should be place, if you want that all content of the page must loaded. –  ace May 20 '11 at 6:21
1  
@Lance Roberts: here's some code for you: document.close() document.write() executed after an document has been loaded opens a document, so close() is required on this document after write(). see my comment 10hrs ago. And also see: developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/document.write If you had post your code at the beginning this question has been solved after 2 or 3 minutes. –  Dr.Molle May 20 '11 at 16:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After calling document.write(), you must call document.close() if the document was previously not closed.

Basically, this happens:

  1. The page is getting parsed
  2. Scripts are processed
  3. Page is "closed" (document.close())

If document.write() is called within step 2, it will be finished in step 3. Beyond step 3, if you call document.write, you're opening the page again, but the page won't close itself in FF (not sure about others). You've to close it by calling document.close().

I discovered this when I needed to open a window and write into it quickly in FF.

var win = window.open();
win.document.write("something");
// the next line is required to finish the page
win.document.close();

The same applies to your case:

<script type="text/javascript">
function calculate()
{
    var grade = document.getElementById("grade").value.toUpperCase();
    switch (grade)
    {
    case "A":
        document.write("Outstanding Achievement");
        break;
    // removed some cases
    case "F":
        document.write("Failing Grade");
        break;
    }
    // finish the document
    document.close();
}
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
OK, but I have other samples using document.write() that don't have document.close() and still don't throb (though it did solve it for this example). –  Lance Roberts May 20 '11 at 16:17
    
In those cases, the page was still loading and the document tree was not finished yet: <script>document.write("X");function f(){document.write("Y")}</script><button onclick="f()">Write Y</button> –  Lekensteyn May 20 '11 at 16:18
    
example edited in. –  Lance Roberts May 20 '11 at 16:22
    
@LanceRoberts: that example is similar the code I provided in my previous comment, the document is still loading, the whole document (HTML, not media like images) has not been fully parsed. –  Lekensteyn May 20 '11 at 16:24
    
@Lekensteyn, but I'm saying the opposite, that the 2nd sample never throbs, it just stops without a close(). –  Lance Roberts May 20 '11 at 16:27

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