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I have a simplified test scenario useful for asking this question: A Product can have many Components, a Component can belong to many Products. EF generated the classes, I've slimmed them as follows:

public partial class Product
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Component> Components { get; set; }
}
public partial class Component
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Product> Products { get; set; }
}

The creation of a component is accomplished via these controller actions:

public ActionResult Create(int ProductId)
{
    Product p = db.Products.Find(ProductId);
    Component c = new Component();
    c.Products.Add(p);
    return PartialView(c);
} 

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(Component model)
{
    db.Components.Add(model);
    db.SaveChanges();
}

and the view returned by the GET method looks like this:

@model Test.Models.Product

<fieldset>
    <legend>Product</legend>
    <div class="display-label">Name</div>
    <div class="display-field">@Model.Name</div>
</fieldset>

@Html.Action("Create", "Component", new {ProductId = Model.Id}) 
<p>
    @Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Edit", new { id=Model.Id }) |
    @Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index")
</p>

From which can be seen that the component creation is handled on the same page via the above Html.Action - the code for that view follows:

@model Test.Models.Component
@using Test.Models

<script type="text/javascript">
    function Success() {
        alert('ok');
    }
    function Failure() {
        alert('err');
    }
</script>
@using (Ajax.BeginForm("Create", "Component", new AjaxOptions
{
    HttpMethod = "Post",
    OnSuccess = "Success",
    OnFailure = "Failure"
}))
{
    <fieldset>
        <legend>Components</legend>

        <div class="editor-label">
            @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Name)
        </div>
        <div class="editor-field">
            @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Name)
            @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Name)
        </div>
        @Html.HiddenFor(x => x.Products.First().Id)
        @Html.HiddenFor(x => x.Products)
        @foreach (Product p in Model.Products)
        {
            @Html.Hidden("Products[0].Id", p.Id)
        }
        @foreach (Product p in Model.Products)
        {
            @Html.Hidden("[0].Id", p.Id)
        }
    </fieldset>
    <input type="submit" value="go" />
}

ok. so this is what I'm struggling with: I need the model parameter of the [HttpPost]back to get properly populated i.e. it should contain a Product, since I can't create the new component with a null product. To get the product I need to look it up via the product's id. I expect I should be able to do:

model.Products.Add(db.Products.Find(model.Products.First().Id));

or some such thing, which relies on model receiving the id. This means the view has to place the id there, presumably in a hidden field, and as can be seen from my view code, I've made several attempts at populating this, all of which have failed.

Normally I prefer the *For methods since they become responsible for generating correct nomenclature. If .Products were singular (.Product), I could reference it as x => x.Product.Id and everything would be fine, but since it's plural, I can't do x => x.Products.Id so I tried x => x.Products.First().Id which compiles and produces the right value but gets name Id (which is wrong since the model binder thinks it's Component.Id and not Component.Products[0].Id.

My second attempt was to let HiddenFor iterate (like I would with EditorFor):

@Html.HiddenFor(x => x.Products)

but that produces nothing - I've read that this helper doesn't iterate. I tried x => x.Products.First() but that doesn't even compile. Finally, I decided to abandon the *For and code the name myself:

@foreach (Product p in Model.Products)
{
    @Html.Hidden("Products[0].Id", p.Id)

and though that looks right, the postback doesn't see my value (Products.Count == 0). I saw in some posting that format should look like [0].Id but that doesn't work either. grr...

I gather I could code it like this:

@Html.Hidden("ProductId", p.Id)

and then redeclare my controller action like this:

[HttpPost] ActionResult Create(Component model, int ProductId)

but that seems eecky. it's hard to believe this is so difficult. can anyone help?

  • e

p.s. I have a project I could make available for download if anyone cares

share|improve this question
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Instead of writing those foreach loops try using editor templates:

<fieldset>
    <legend>Components</legend>

    <div class="editor-label">
        @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Name)
    </div>

    <div class="editor-field">
        @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Name)
        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Name)
    </div>

    @Html.EditorFor(x => x.Products)
</fieldset>

and inside the corresponding editor template (~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/Product.cshtml)

@model Product
@Html.HiddenFor(x => x.Id)
share|improve this answer
    
ohhhhh........ that is just brilliant. if I had a bunch of credits to give you'd get them right now. laughing... I must be so dense the solution didn't occur to me. thanks a bunch! – ekkis May 20 '11 at 16:07
1  
one question left in my mind is: why didn't my first loop work? it generated <input id="Products_0__Id" name="Products[0].Id" type="hidden" value="1" /> which looks correct but the back end didn't pick it up. The .EditorFor() approach generates identical output except that it adds the data validation tag attributes... – ekkis May 20 '11 at 16:16

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