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What is the syntax for a for loop in TSQL?

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@Macho more info needed –  self May 20 '11 at 7:56
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SQL is a very different language compared to what you're used to. It's focused on what, not how. You tell SQL Server what results you want, and let it figure out how to produce the answer. Or, to repharse what I've just said - there isn't a for loop in SQL. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 20 '11 at 7:58
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WHILE @I < 10; SET @I = @I + 1; BEGIN; ...; END? However, this should not be used for most query processing (but is sometimes required for imperative manipulation). Many such instructions/hints are available on google using the search "tsql for loop". –  user166390 May 20 '11 at 7:58
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Avoid loops in favour of JOINs and set operations. –  Oded May 20 '11 at 7:59
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If you are not expert in SQL, you should not be considering using a loop. There are only a few conditions where one is needed and most of the rest of the time, using a loop is the equivalent of pushing your car instead of driving it. Learn to think in terms of data sets instead of looping through records. LOoping is an expert level function not because the syntax is hard but because you need to know exactly how much harm you can do with it before you should be allowed to use it. –  HLGEM Aug 14 '13 at 21:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 85 down vote accepted

T-SQL doesn't have a FOR loop, it has a WHILE loop
WHILE (Transact-SQL)

WHILE Boolean_expression
BEGIN

END
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JOINs (and set operations) should be preferred over looping constructs in SQL. –  Oded May 20 '11 at 7:58
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...where applicable... –  user166390 May 20 '11 at 8:00
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There is no limit on stressing (especially for those that are new to SQL), what Damien said: "SQL is a very different language compared to what you're used to. It's focused on what, not how. You tell SQL Server what results you want, and let it figure out how to produce the answer. " –  ypercube May 20 '11 at 8:05
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It interesting to note the the MS documentation is wrong here, really. WHILE doesn't take a boolean expression - it takes a predicate - which in addition to being able to evaluate to TRUE or FALSE, could also be UNKNOWN. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 20 '11 at 8:08
    
@ypercube : I 100% Agree with you. –  jams May 20 '11 at 8:09

There is no for-loop, only the while-loop:

DECLARE @i int = 0
WHILE @i < 20 BEGIN
    SET @i = @i + 1
    /* do some work */
END
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Be it noted that if you intend to use the index in the loop you may want to increment last thing instead of first, depending on your use case. –  jinglesthula Mar 4 '13 at 18:24
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Also note that default value for local variable is not supported in plain SQL. Hence you need separate SET @i = 0 before for loop. –  Nux Oct 27 at 12:42
    
@Nux: the 0 is set during declaration explicitly –  TcKs Oct 27 at 16:15
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Yes, but that doesn't work on older SQL Servers (at least not on 2005). –  Nux Oct 29 at 13:31

DECLARE @intFlag INT
SET @intFlag = 1
WHILE (@intFlag <=5) 
BEGIN
    PRINT @intFlag
    SET @intFlag = @intFlag + 1
END
GO
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Welcome to Stack Overflow! Would you consider adding some narrative to explain why this code works, and what makes it an answer to the question? This would be very helpful to the person asking the question, and anyone else who comes along. –  Andrew Barber Mar 1 '13 at 10:07

How about this:

BEGIN Do Something END GO 10

... of course you could put an incremental counter inside it if you need to count.

Kris

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