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I am starting work on a message processing system, where a variety of messages will arrive from an external source and need to be "handled". The message objects are basically DTO's.

I am thinking of having the message classes live in their own assembly, available both to the message processing system and to the external system, and having the handlers inherit from a generic abstract class, along the following rough lines:

Messages.dll

public abstract class Message {}

public class FooMessage : Message
{
  ...
}

public class BarMessage : Message
{
  ...
}

MessageHandlers.dll

public abstract class MessageHandler<TMessage> where TMessage : Message
{
  public void Handle(TMessage message);
}

public class FooHandler : MessageHandler<FooMessage>
{
  public void Handle(FooMessage message)
  {
    ...
  }
}

And now the question: What is the best way to glue all this together? I can certainly do a bit of reflection and write a helper function to instantiate the appropriate handler based on the incoming message name, but isn't this exactly the sort of thing IoC containers are supposed to be good at? Is there a particular one better suited for the job? Opinions and pointers appreciated.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I'd be surprised if .NET's IObservable doesn't already have something that does this, but I'm not super familiar with it. – Cory Nelson May 20 '11 at 8:59
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are several ways to register your handlers. I always start by configuring everything by hand. In your example, it would look like this:

<!-- language: c# -->
container.Register<IMessageHandler<FooMessage>, FooHandler>();
container.Register<IMessageHandler<BarMessage>, BarHandler>();
// etc

Tip: Rather than using a abstract base class, define an IMessageHandler<T> interface.

Once the application is growing, this can get cumbersome, so in your case, batch registration should be the way to go. All DI containers have different mechanisms for this. Most containers support this out of the box, while others don't. Here is how to do it using Simple Injector:

<!-- language: c# -->
container.RegisterManyOpenGeneric(typeof(MessageHandler<>),
    typeof(MessageHandler<>).Assembly);

This will register all concrete types that implement MessageHandler<T> and live in the same assembly as the MessageHandler<T>. Again, it depends on your container of choice how to write this.

For processing incoming arbitrary messages, you will need a bit of reflection, but you shouldn't do this in the application itself. Just define a good abstraction in the application and move the use of reflection inside the part of the application where you have your DI configuration.

What you can do for instance, is define an IMessageProcessor interface, that allows processing any type of Message:

<!-- language: c# -->
public interface IMessageProcessor
{
    void Process(Message message);
}

Near your DI configuration, you can define an implementation of IMessageProcessor, and it could look like this:

<!-- language: c# -->
private class DIMessageProcessor : IMessageProcessor
{
    private readonly Container container;

    public DIMessageProcessor(Container container)
    {
        this.container = container;
    }

    public void Process(Message message)
    {
        if (message == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("message");

        Type messageType = message.GetType();

        Type handlerType =
            typeof(IMessageHandler<>).MakeGenericType(messageType);

        var handler = this.container.GetInstance(handlerType);

        handlerType.GetMethod("Handle").Invoke(handler, message);
    }
}

Leaving this out of the application is important. Not only would you be mixing responsibilities, but it would be harder to add new behavior. Think for instance about preventing message replays (when a message is executed multiple times). It would be easy to implement this behavior as a decorator of IMessageProcessor. Besides this, the DIMessageProcessor would be easy to unit test, or replaced with a new more performant implementation (and unit tested again).

There are several ways to register the DIMessageProcessor, depending on your container of choice. Using Simple Injector for instance:

<!-- language: c# -->
container.RegisterSingle<IMessageProcessor>(new DIMessageProcessor(container));

With this in place you can inject the IMessageProcessor into the types that need this. Here is an example for WCF:

<!-- language: c# -->
[ServiceKnownType("GetKnownMessageTypes")]
public class WCFMessageService
{
    private readonly IMessageProcessor processor;

    public WCFMessageService()
    {
        this.processor = 
            Global.Container.GetInstance<IMessageProcessor>();
    }

    [OperationContract]
    public void Process(Message message)
    {
        this.processor.Process(message);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<Type> GetKnownMessageTypes(
        ICustomAttributeProvider provider)
    {
        var knownMessageTypes =
            from type in typeof(Message).Assembly.GetTypes()
            where typeof(Message).IsAssignableFrom(type)
            select type;

        return knownMessageTypes.ToArray();
    }
}

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

I did something similar based on Windsor a while back. You can read about this here.

share|improve this answer

Assuming that all components are correctly configured in the container, this is how you can handle a message (where the message in this case is a serialized message being transported over a queue):

var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
using (var s = new MemoryStream(message.AsBytes))
{
    dynamic consumable = formatter.Deserialize(s);

    var consumerType = typeof(IMessageConsumer<>).MakeGenericType(consumable.GetType());
    dynamic consumer = this.container.Resolve(consumerType);
    consumer.Consume(consumable);
}

Full sample code is available here: https://github.com/ploeh/CQRSonAzureDemo/blob/master/BookingWorkerRole/AzureQueueMessageProcessor.cs

share|improve this answer
    
@Mark, thank you, could you also point me to where the container is configured in this app? – Michael Teper May 20 '11 at 16:42
    
The background worker container is configured here: github.com/ploeh/CQRSonAzureDemo/blob/master/BookingWorkerRole/… – Mark Seemann May 20 '11 at 16:59
    
@Mark, so really this, right: github.com/ploeh/CQRSonAzureDemo/blob/master/BookingWorkerRole/… ? Does that mean that each handler would have to be configured individually? I was hoping for a bit less friction. – Michael Teper May 20 '11 at 17:07
    
That's a different concern. In that app I never got around to define convention-based configuration, but that would be possible. – Mark Seemann May 21 '11 at 6:49
    
@Mark, its one of my main concerns -- the question is about the best way to glue this together (so both registration and resolution). – Michael Teper May 21 '11 at 20:50

Since you need to use a Request/Response messaging pattern you can use the Agatha (agatha-rrsl) project. It is an implementation of that pattern, it is mature, tested under heavy load and works in-process and of course outside the process boundaries using WCF.

It has built-in everything you mention and integrates with many popular IoC containers (Windsor, StructureMap, Unity, Spring.NET, Ninject) so you will not have to re-invent the wheel and start focusing on your business logic.

You may find very useful articles, usage tips, and a lot of information on Davy Brion's blog here.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you, but Agatha is not what I am after. Its the wrong type of communication pattern for my use case. Here's the relevant config part though: github.com/davybrion/Agatha/blob/master/Agatha.ServiceLayer/… – Michael Teper May 21 '11 at 20:48
    
@Michael, what is the pattern you describe? I read about DTOs, messages and message handlers. Yes this part you mention is for using agatha with wcf. – Nikos Baxevanis May 21 '11 at 23:07

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