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Does System.Activator.CreateInstance(T) method have performance issues (since I'm suspecting it uses reflection) big enough to discourage us from using it casually?

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The only answer will be "depends". Yes, it does use reflection, and yes, use it if you need it! –  Vladislav Zorov May 20 '11 at 9:18
1  
It might help to know, that "new T()" in templates uses Activator.CreateInstance<T>() behind the scenes also. –  Christian.K May 20 '11 at 9:19
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@Lasse V. Karlsen, @Pacerier: sorry, too much C++ lately, I ment "when using Generics" (see Remarks) –  Christian.K May 20 '11 at 9:40
    
@Christian do you mean that when we specify {new} as a type constraint in generics and we call new T it actually uses System.Activator? –  Pacerier May 20 '11 at 10:12
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@Pacerier: Yes, that is what he is saying, and it is backed by the MSDN page he links to (Remarks in his comment.) –  Lasse V. Karlsen May 20 '11 at 10:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

As always, the only correct way to answer a question about performance is to actually measure the code.

Here's a sample LINQPad program that tests:

  • Activator.CreateInstance
  • new T()
  • calling a delegate that calls new T()

As always, take the performance program with a grain of salt, there might be bugs here that skews the results.

The output (timing values are in milliseconds):

Test1 - Activator.CreateInstance<T>() 
12342 

Test2 - new T() 
1119 

Test3 - Delegate 
1530 

Baseline 
578 

Note that the above timings are for 100.000.000 (100 million) constructions of the object. The overhead might not be a real problem for your program.

Cautionary conclusion would be that Activator.CreateInstance<T> is taking roughly 11 times as much time to do the same job as a new T() does, and a delegate takes roughly 1.5 times as much. Note that the constructor here does nothing, so I only tried to measure the overhead of the different methods.

Edit: I added a baseline call that does not construct the object, but does the rest of the things, and timed that as well. With that as a baseline, it looks like a delegate takes 75% more time than a simple new(), and the Activator.CreateInstance takes around 1100% more.

However, this is micro-optimization. If you really need to do this, and eek out the last ounce of performance of some time-critical code, I would either hand-code a delegate to use instead, or if that is not possible, ie. you need to provide the type at runtime, I would use Reflection.Emit to produce that delegate dynamically.

In any case, and here is my real answer:

If you have a performance problem, first measure to see where your bottleneck is. Yes, the above timings might indicate that Activator.CreateInstance has more overhead than a dynamically built delegate, but there might be much bigger fish to fry in your codebase before you get (or even have to get) to this level of optimization.

And just to make sure I actually answer your concrete question: No, I would not discourage use of Activator.CreateInstance. You should be aware that it uses reflection so that you know that if this tops your profiling lists of bottlenecks, then you might be able to do something about it, but the fact that it uses reflection does not mean it is the bottleneck.

The program:

void Main()
{
    const int IterationCount = 100000000;

    // warmup
    Test1();
    Test2();
    Test3();
    Test4();

    // profile Activator.CreateInstance<T>()
    Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (int index = 0; index < IterationCount; index++)
        Test1();
    sw.Stop();
    sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.Dump("Test1 - Activator.CreateInstance<T>()");

    // profile new T()
    sw.Restart();
    for (int index = 0; index < IterationCount; index++)
        Test2();
    sw.Stop();
    sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.Dump("Test2 - new T()");

    // profile Delegate
    sw.Restart();
    for (int index = 0; index < IterationCount; index++)
        Test3();
    sw.Stop();
    sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.Dump("Test3 - Delegate");

    // profile Baseline
    sw.Restart();
    for (int index = 0; index < IterationCount; index++)
        Test4();
    sw.Stop();
    sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.Dump("Baseline");
}

public void Test1()
{
    var obj = Activator.CreateInstance<TestClass>();
    GC.KeepAlive(obj);
}

public void Test2()
{
    var obj = new TestClass();
    GC.KeepAlive(obj);
}

static Func<TestClass> Create = delegate
{
    return new TestClass();
};

public void Test3()
{
    var obj = Create();
    GC.KeepAlive(obj);
}

TestClass x = new TestClass();
public void Test4()
{
    GC.KeepAlive(x);
}

public class TestClass
{
}
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Interesting to note that T Create<T>() where T: new() { return new T()} is as slow as Activator.CreateInstance so there is a huge penalty when instantiating generic type classes :( –  Arunas May 20 '11 at 9:52
1  
Well, I wouldn't say huge, as it is relative to other costs. It is more costly than a simple new(), but I doubt it is a problem in any but the most extreme cases. –  Lasse V. Karlsen May 20 '11 at 9:57

It depends on your use case. If you need very high performance and are creating many objects then using Activator.CreateInstance may be a problem.

But in most cases it will be fast enough and it is a very powerful method of creating objects.

In fact, most IoC Containers/Service locators/whatever you call them use this method to create an object of the type you are requesting.

If you are worried that the performance is not good enough then you should do a profiling of your application and measure if you have a bottleneck and where it is. My guess is that the call to Activator.CreateInstance will not be your problem.

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Yes there is a performance difference between calling

(MyClass)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(MyClass));

and

new MyClass();

where the latter is faster. But determining whether the speed drop is big enough is up to your domain. In 90% of the case it's not an issue. Also note that for value types, Activator.CreateInstance is again slower because of the unboxing involved.

But here is the catch: For generic types, they are similar. new T() internally calls Activator.CreateInstance<T>() which in turn calls RuntimeType.CreateInstanceDefaultCtor(...). So if you're having a generic method to create new instance of T, then it shouldn't matter, though having a new() constraint and calling new T() is much more readable. Here's relevant link on the subject by Jon Skeet.

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