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I have a basic python question. I'm working on a class foo and I use __init__(): to do some actions on a value:

class foo():
  def __init__(self,bar=None):
    self.bar=bar
    if bar is None: 
       isSet=False  
    else:
       isSet=True
  print isSet

When I execute the code I get: NameError: name 'isSet' is not defined.
How can I access isSet? What am I doing wrong?

regards, martin

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1  
Your class name should be Foo as class names should use CapitalizedWords convention according to PEP8 –  cerberos May 20 '11 at 10:23
1  
And his member should be is_set, too, since members use lowercase_with_underscores. –  Evpok May 20 '11 at 10:57

5 Answers 5

Wrong indentation, it should be this instead, otherwise you're exiting the function.

class foo():
  def __init__(self,bar=None):
    self.bar=bar

    if bar is None: 
       isSet=False  
    else:
       isSet=True

    print isSet
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Yeah I want to execute it in the context of the class. So the indentation is correct. I want to access isSet from code located in the class, not in def __init__() –  Martin May 20 '11 at 9:13
    
@Martin: Then it doesn't make sense, because __init__ is run only when an instance is created, not when the class is being created. What you really trying to do? –  Cat Plus Plus May 20 '11 at 9:14
    
I want to do the following: a=foo(bar=0x03). Then check if if bar is set when i create the object (imho this should be done with __init__()) Then I want to work with that bar within the class. Meaning, I want to perform different actions depending on the values of the variable bar. I hope you understand. Thanks for your help –  Martin May 20 '11 at 9:17
    
@Martin: Still can't see why you need it in the class scope. Code there is executed when the type is created, long before any instances can be made, so you can't access anything that would be a result of __init__ (or any other method). –  Cat Plus Plus May 20 '11 at 9:25

It depends on what you are trying to do. You probably want isSet to be a member of foo:

class foo():
  def __init__(self,bar=None):
    self.bar=bar
    self.isSet=True
    if bar is None: 
       self.isSet=False  

f = foo()
print f.isSet
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The indentation of the final line makes it execute in the context of the class and not __init__. Indent it one more time to make your program work.

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It's exactly what I want, I want to execute it in the context of the class, and not in init –  Martin May 20 '11 at 9:10
1  
@Martin What does "execute in the context of the class" means? If it means inside a member method, see answers, if it means at class declaration you can't access anyhing created in __init__ there, because __init__ has never been called. –  Evpok May 20 '11 at 9:30

I'd try

class foo():
  def __init__(self,bar=None):
    self.bar = bar
    self.is_set = (bar is None)

Then inside the class

...
def spam(self, eggs, ham):
    if self.is_set:
        print("Camelot!")
    else:
...

Have you read the doc's tutorial's entry about classes?

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In your code, isSet is a class attribute, as opposed to an instance attribute. Therefore in the class body you need to define it before referencing it in the print statement. Outside the class and in its methods, you must prefix it with the class name and a dot, i.e. Foo. in this case. Note that the code in def __init__() function body does not execute until you create an instance of the Foo class by calling it.

class Foo(object):
    isSet = None

    def __init__(self, bar=None):
        self.bar = bar

        if bar is None:
           Foo.isSet = False
        else:
           Foo.isSet = True

    print isSet

f = Foo()
print Foo.isSet

output:

None
False
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